Reuse dirty water or restart fresh?

#1
We had some work done on our pool this week and I'm seeking advice on how to proceed getting started back up. The pool is currently about 50% (or slightly more) drained but the water is filthy due to said projects.

Project #1 - ripped out old aggregate deck and replaced with travertine pavers. The water is now pretty filthy due to all the of the dirt being shoveled around, and especially with the travertine dust produced when they were saw cutting all of the stone to fit around the coping and other edges of the back yard. I had to drain the pool down about half way due to Project #2 below, so it is extra filthy with only 50% water and could probably use a good rinsing and scrub down to clear all of the stone dust.

Project #2 - replaced the skimmer. When the old aggregate was torn out, we noticed that the skimmer had cracks and external damage where we previously only thought there was a minor internal crack. Since the deck was already out, we decided to just replace the skimmer (hence the pool being drained down below the plumbing).

Given that the pool is already 50% drained, should I:

A) Finish draining all the way and give it a good rinse/scrub, before filling it back up with completely fresh water. Then just start back up with chemicals.
B) Leave the existing dirty water, fill it up and start back up with chemicals.

Other factors/considerations:
  • I have a 5.5 HP gas powered pump with a 2" suction and discharge line so it would be very minimal time/effort to drain the remaining filthy water.
  • My current filters are due for replacement and I have a set of fresh filters I'm planning to install upon startup

I've never gone through something like this on my own and still a fairly amateur pool owner so looking for advice/recommendations on how best to proceed. I'm leaning toward just draining, giving everything a good cleaning and then refilling completely. But maybe I should just let the old filters do the initial water circulation cleaning, then vacuum, scrub tile, etc. and then replace the old filters with the new ones I have?

Any insight or advice is greatly appreciated!
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
#2
With a 9K pool, I'd personally be inclined to simply change out a majority of what's remaining. Not all of it though because you always want to leave about 1-2 feet in the pool, or to the lowest step for pool shell stability. You'll still need to do a little post-fill cleaning/filtering, but it won't be so overwhelming on your overall system - or YOU as the one who has to rinse those cartridges more often. If you had a way to vacuum to waste that might be different. Then with everything settled to the bottom you could try a slow, gentle vacuum to waste and perhaps get a lot out hat way. But if you don't have that capability, or if its a fine dust that simply doesn't want to settle anyways, I'd remove more water then start over.
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
10,218
Bedford, TX
#3
jr,

Not sure about Carrollton, but in Bedford, I can fill my 17K pool for about $50 bucks... I too would vote for draining and replacing the dirty water...

If you tell the city water department they may waive the sewer fees on the new fill water... but you have to tell them before doing it. It can't hurt to ask...

Thanks,

Jim R.
 
#4
With a 9K pool, I'd personally be inclined to simply change out a majority of what's remaining. Not all of it though because you always want to leave about 1-2 feet in the pool, or to the lowest step for pool shell stability. You'll still need to do a little post-fill cleaning/filtering, but it won't be so overwhelming on your overall system - or YOU as the one who has to rinse those cartridges more often. If you had a way to vacuum to waste that might be different. Then with everything settled to the bottom you could try a slow, gentle vacuum to waste and perhaps get a lot out hat way. But if you don't have that capability, or if its a fine dust that simply doesn't want to settle anyways, I'd remove more water then start over.
Unfortunately, the only vacuum method I would have is using the suction from the pool pump. I'll probably go ahead and drain it as low as possible and then fill back up and restart. Thanks for the quick reply!

- - - Updated - - -

Yes, it's pretty inexpensive to refill the pool so I'm not too worried from that perspective. I was mainly just trying to determine if draining out the majority of the water left behind is worth the effort, or if I should just go ahead and refill and let the equipment start to do the job. Checking with the city for the sewer fees is a great idea. Thanks for the advice!

Jeff