Retaining wall blocks for support under AGP pool

dhane3

Active member
Jul 7, 2019
44
Merritt Island, Florida
I think trying to put in and level 16 of those bricks will do me in. I saw a video linked in another thread where the pavers were placed on top of the ground and tarp. The pool weight will push them down, no? i suppose the pool liner won't lay properly if it's done that way. Any other concerns with just laying on top of the leveled ground? These bricks are fat and heavy and I'm already in pain. ugh
 

dhane3

Active member
Jul 7, 2019
44
Merritt Island, Florida
I'm setting the pool up now even though it's starting to sprinkle. After it's up and I start filling it, I'll go around to add the pavers. I won't put too much water in it before I finish all the pavers. Does this sound ok?
 

nick_wa

Well-known member
Jun 12, 2012
86
I'm setting the pool up now even though it's starting to sprinkle. After it's up and I start filling it, I'll go around to add the pavers. I won't put too much water in it before I finish all the pavers. Does this sound ok?
Not sure how you will be able to do it when there's any water in it at all? Seems you've already made up your mind, so good luck and hope it works for you!
 

dhane3

Active member
Jul 7, 2019
44
Merritt Island, Florida
I used 4x4x8 pavers 2 to each support. I leveled the ground and then filled in the area with sand to the height of the pavers compacting the sand. Put a tarp done and set the pool up. Going on three years and only problem was one side of the pool is a little lower than the other.
Thanks for sharing that. Yours looks great! I decided to not do anything under the vertical supports because I really didn't have it in me to do it. I finished setting up and filling the pool. After reading that anything over 3" difference, in the levelness, would need to be taken down, I started worrying. I went out and measured the water to the top on the sides that I knew were different at midnight. Fortunately, there is only a 2" difference. Whew! Now on to the chemicals!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lisbek

Casey

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 16, 2007
10,865
SW PA
Your post are now going to sink into the ground when the earth gets wet due to rain and splash out. You are 2" out of level right now according to your post and it will be even worse with the ground getting wet. The foundation of the pool is the most important part of installing an above ground pool (****, even an inground pool). Once you decide to take shortcuts, you've already set yourself up for future issues and pool failures.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bloodfromastone

dhane3

Active member
Jul 7, 2019
44
Merritt Island, Florida
Your post are now going to sink into the ground when the earth gets wet due to rain and splash out. You are 2" out of level right now according to your post and it will be even worse with the ground getting wet. The foundation of the pool is the most important part of installing an above ground pool (****, even an inground pool). Once you decide to take shortcuts, you've already set yourself up for future issues and pool failures.
ugh :cry:
Could we drain the pool and add pavers in a month or so when my husband would have time to help?
 
Last edited:

Casey

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 16, 2007
10,865
SW PA
You can. But you may inherit damage if the legs sink and bow, bend or break.
 

bloodfromastone

Well-known member
Apr 11, 2019
102
Buffalo, NY
Unless those paves are flush with the ground, the shape of those are not going to work well. They really are too small because the legs will move out as you fill and will move a bit more as the kids play, and if someone happens to kick off the side, right at one of the legs, if the brick is on top of the ground, they could kick the leg right off the edge of the brick and now you've got problems. Jacking the leg up to get the brick back under it isn't that hard, but getting that leg pushed back in towards the pool so that it's straight up and down is impossible. Also, please use mason sand under the pool as regular sand will wash out with the water splashing over the side. Mason sand is made to stay compacted and "harden" so to speak, in place. Then use foam insulation board rather than sand to soften the bottom of the pool.
 

dhane3

Active member
Jul 7, 2019
44
Merritt Island, Florida
@bloodfromastone Yea, I wondered about the surface area not being big enough. There won't be kids splashing about, just 2-3 adults. It's too late now for the foundation prep but if I ever do this again, I will do it differently. I think I bit off more than I could chew trying to do most of it alone. I tried to do it as economically as I could and what I thought I could do myself. Thanks for your thoughts. I passed on the info about the pavers and getting the legs straight to my husband.