Replacing Hayward Super Pump

Drew31

Active member
Aug 19, 2018
26
Southwest Indiana
Getting tired of the cost of running my 1 HP Hayward Super Pump, so I've begun researching dual or variable speed pumps. Our pool is 18x36 and I've estimated ~20,000 gallons. 1 1/2" piping. We do not have 240V wiring at the pump, so would really prefer to keep any replacement to the 120V to avoid extra electrician expense. I also can get a $300 rebate from energy company on a variable speed pump (need to double check if it's still good if self-installed, which is my preference. Let's assume it is). I've done some testing using a kill-a-watt and looks like my current pump averages right around 1 kW per hour, which from what I've read seems inline with my pump size. In reading old threads, seems that it's difficult to get the payback on a variable vs just getting a dual speed. That said, maybe the $300 rebate tips the math in my favor? Also - my desire to stick to 120V also seems to restrict my choices. Best option I've found thus far is the Pentair SuperMax VS Variable Speed Pump 115/230V - 343001. Presently $820 but would be net $520 for me post rebate.

Looking for some advice/experience of those that have gone through this process. Pump is at least 6 years old (was in place when bought house), but put a new motor on in 2017.
 

cowboycasey

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 3, 2013
4,435
Fletcher, OK
I would be much cheaper going to 220v as the V green VS motor you would only change the motor and keep your pump and pipe exactly the same.. The V green pump is only 400 dollars so the cost to change would be 100 dollars after the rebate.. :)

So far I love the V green along with many more people here...

 

Drew31

Active member
Aug 19, 2018
26
Southwest Indiana
Ah, that would make more sense and be easier. Do you know what's involved to turn it into 220V? Guess I'm trying to figure out what that runs, but I do like the idea of just switching out the motor. Just trying to think what it'll involve from an electrician. I've done electrical before, but not 220V and don't think this is a good DIY project.
 

Drew31

Active member
Aug 19, 2018
26
Southwest Indiana
Also, my current pump is wired with a plug, which then is just plugged into a nearby outlet near the pump, hence the 110V. This was set up this way when we moved into the house and pool company left that way when we replaced motor in '17. If I go with 200V, I'll have to have the pump hard wired to a box vs. a plug, I assume. It appears it really should be hard wired anyway.
 

cowboycasey

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 3, 2013
4,435
Fletcher, OK
So both ways have there merit but most pumps are 220v so your selection gets slim at 110v.. It will add to the cost running 220v but it is a better solution..