Recommended replacement ... pump smoking and sparking

shorembo

Active member
Jan 24, 2012
29
SW Florida
My 17 year old pump is now smoking and sparking and popping the breaker (Hayward SP3010X15AZ Super II 1-1/2-Horsepower Pool Pump set to 230V)

At this point, I have also been having some humming issues and a little leak. It sounds like my options are either to replace the motor (which I have done in the past) or get a whole new pump unit. I am tempted to just get a whole new pump due to the age of the pump and the cost of running the pump (I run it during daylight hours due to the amount of leaves and stuff falling into the pool). I believe my power bill for the pool runs upwards of $60 a month sometimes.

Details of the pool are 4 jets and one skimmer with 17K gallon uncaged and lots of vegetation (see the pics). Probably 1/4 of the days of the year I get a 1/2 to full skimmer basket.

Any recommendations on a replacement that is semi-affordable? I know now the pumps can be variable speed or two speed but really don't know how that works.

IMG_20191019_101856897.jpgIMG_20191019_101828108_HDR.jpg
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,990
Evans, Georgia
I forgot to mention that many electric providers offer rebates on the purchase of variable speed pumps, and in a little over a year the federal gov't has mandated that all new pool pumps over .7 hp be variable speed. Might as well get in on it now before the prices go up!

Maddie :flower:
 

setsailsoon

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Oct 25, 2015
1,868
Stuart/FL
Shore,

Wow, very nice pool setting and 17 years is pretty good! My next pump and/or motor will be a VS pump. Pays for itself very quickly especially with our long seasons here in Florida. We never close and swim a lot so I'll soon be upgrading our 6 year old pump to install a V-Green VS motor. It should pay out in a year or less for us. Here's some options in approximate order of cost:
  • Absolute cheapest solution is replace the motor. But a 17 year pump will likely have other failures soon.
  • A 2-speed pump is perhaps your next bump up in cost but will require changes to your controls to get the most benefit and the ultimate best savings is nowhere near as good as a VS pump.
  • A VS motor using your existing pump is your next option but probably adds $300 to the cost that should pay out in a year for your location.
  • Replace pump and motor which will add the most cost but will be the most trouble free and likely pay out in less than 2 years.
As is often the case, the best value is more expensive up front. Many pump installations have the motor over-sized because they used old fashioned "rules of thumb" for sizing instead of a real technical analysis. We have more information on this topic and experts that can help you "right-size" your new pump. For all options replace the seal on the pump as this likely caused your motor failure. If you do this DIY consider warranty. Some manufacturers reduce warranty for self install, Jandy drops it to zero.

I hope this helps.

Chris
 
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shorembo

Active member
Jan 24, 2012
29
SW Florida
Thanks for the replies.
So if I want to DIY with a variable speed pump, how do I determine the correct model/size? I currently have a 1 1/2 HP but is it just as simple to replace with the same HP? I am not sure what other variables can affect:
17K Gallons
1750C Hayward Cartridge Filter
Outdoor uncaged
One skimmer
Salt generator
Intermatic timing controller
etc.
 

setsailsoon

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Oct 25, 2015
1,868
Stuart/FL
Yes, you can always replace with the same pump, same HP and that's the easiest but can be improved by right-sizing it. Please read this article from Pool School for more information about run-time that affects pump selection. VS pumps seem to come in 2 sizes 1.65 hp and 2.7 hp. The HP is varied with frequency control which is a major advantage. You only run the precise HP needed and you can vary this using any speed from about 600 rpm to 3450 rpm. There is a huge decrease in power for two reasons. First a small reduction in rpm can reduce power requirement dramatically, and second VS pumps us permanent magnet motors which are 20-30% more efficient than an equivalent single speed motor. If it were me, I'd go with a 1.65 hp VS pump and motor due to your pump's age. Or just a motor that's compatible with your pump if there is one for your pump.

It would be best to get an expert to weigh in on this: @Teald024 @JamesW

I hope this helps.

Chris
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
11,635
Northern NJ
Variable speed pumps are really variable horsepower. You don;t need to concern with the HP as you can set it to your needs.

In addition a higher HP Vs pump is more efficient running at a lower speed then a lower HP VS pump is running at a higher speed.

So a 3 HP VS pump running at the RPM equivalent of 1.5 HP will use less electricity then a 1.5 HP VS pump running at 100%.

So get at least a 1.5 HP VS pump and consider getting a 3 HP or so VS pump if your budget allows.
 
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shorembo

Active member
Jan 24, 2012
29
SW Florida
OK... upon review of everyones helpful comments...

Option Motor Replacement with Single Speed: Runs around $200. Still may have pump hum/flow issues and still high cost of electricity.

Option VS Motor Replacement: Runs around $450. Still may have pump hum/flow. No connector changes needed. Lower cost of electricity with the VS.

Option Pump Replacement: I see the Pentair Superflo VS runs around $700. That seems to be the least expensive brand name. (Others run $400 but are very, very off brand).

I think that sums up the least expensive paths for the 3 options.

I end up having two questions...
1. With the Variable motor and pump, is there an issue with the Salt Water Generator being turned on / off with the Intermatic Timing Controller? The pump and SWG are currently powered through the controller.
2. Are the connectors usually standard connectors that I can find at boxstore?

Thanks a bunch,
James
 

RMcGirr83

Gold Supporter
Nov 19, 2018
487
Tuscola, TX
VS motors have their own controller and timers. You can, and should, direct wire the pump and set the time on the timer for the SWG. Set to run the SWG after the pump comes on and off before the pump turns off. Many SWG's also have a fail safe flow switch which won't allow the SWG to come on if the flow from the pump isn't enough.