Recommendations for new energy efficient pump

Peter T

Member
Sep 24, 2009
20
Maybe you guys have covered this already in another post, but I want to replace my old pump to take advantage of SCEdison's $200 rebate for more efficient pump. I have 15k pool, solar heated, no spa, full sun all day. What HP do I need but more importantly, WHICH ONE? SCE gave a long list of qualifying pumps but I dread having to do the research with no technical knowledge. Am looking for one with most "value"- adequate power, good quality, low price. I don't want to spend more than $500--is there one for me? Would really appreciate if you guys can at least narrow it down to three choices for me. Thanks!
Peter
 

mas985

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 3, 2007
12,379
Pleasanton, CA
As far as size, I have a 1/2 HP on a 20k gallon pool with solar on a 25' roof so it is really hard to get a pump that is too small for that type of setup. The bottom line is the smaller the pump, the lower the energy costs. Two speeds can also help but tend to cost more. Pumps labeled as energy efficient tend to be only about 5-10% better than the standard pumps. The industry guys tend to lean toward Pentair pump for their reliability.

How high are your solar panels and how many return ports (eyeballs) do you have?
 

Peter T

Member
Sep 24, 2009
20
thx Mark for quick reply,
My solar heater runs up my patio, which is about 8-9 feet high, about 20 feet from the pool, with two returns.
What about VARIABLE speed pumps? I've been seeing advertised savings of $1500-$2000 per year on electric cost if I go with variable pumps, and 30-40% more savings than 2-speed.
 

mas985

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 3, 2007
12,379
Pleasanton, CA
Cost savings estimates are usually over blown for the variables. In this thread is a spreadsheet which allows you to compare pumps under a bit more realistic conditions. No matter if it is a two speed or variable, it is unlikely that you will run on low speed all the time.

On the scenario1 tab, the average US electrical rate is used and 75% of the time is on low speed. Depending on the cost of the pump it can take quite a while to break even.
 

ttmatsu

Member
Apr 16, 2010
14
Escondido, CA
Peter,
You haven't priced variable speed pumps if you are asking to spend $500 or less. So if that is your criteria, you can stop right here because you won't find one for that price. You might get a 2 speed pump at that price and you would need a controller to switch between the 2 speeds. All the variable speeds work in terms of saving you money on utility bills. The question is how you plan to use the pump and how will the cost projections work out for your particular pool and uses. Every pool is slightly different. I have a variable speed pump (only installed for 2 weeks) and I am still tweaking it. I'm not one of the advocates of running the pump 24X7. I run mine at 40 gpm which equates to 1 turnover in 13.3 hours (I don't run the pump that long - right now, I am at 8 hours running time and water quality is fine).

I had a 1.5 HP single speed pump. For 1 turnover, it consumed 16.2 kwh (at $0.27X16.2kwh=$4.37/day, $1595/year). With current setting for my variable speed, it consumes 6.9 kwh per turnover (.27X6.9=$1.86/day, $678.9/year). But that's for a 32K gallon pool. If I ran half my time at a higher speed for feeding a 2nd story solar (say 50 gpm - around what a modern half HP motor puts out) and half at 30 gpm, my annual cost is about the same as running at 40 gpm the whole time. If your pipes and equipment was exactly like mine but with a 15K pool and you ran 1 turnover/day, payback would take 3 years or more.

To get the $200 rebate, you have to have the pump installed by a licensed contractor. In SoCal, they charge around $400-500 to install so don't think of it as getting a discount on the pump, it is a discount on the installation. Fortunately, Pool Services Technologies gave me a TFP member discount on the install. If you don't know someone that is willing to discount, then skip the rebate and install it yourself if you know how. Total cost to install, figure on $800 to $1200 for the pump plus $400-500 for install minus $200 rebate (and remember that the rebate is only good as long as they have funds).

I'll narrow it down to 3 for you - Hybrid Pumps, Jandy ePump and Pentair (SVRS or VF, your choice). The Hayward is less expensive but I was advised to stay away from Hayward pumps by several pool professionals.

As Mark stated, the cost projections by the vendors are assuming you have X configuration and are running the pump at max efficiency only filtering the water. I've given you my real life example and there are several people that have detailed postings of their Pentair with rpm/gpm/watts listings so you can do your own comparison.
 

learthur

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Sep 9, 2008
243
The Woodlands, Texas, USA
I have enjoyed my Hayward TriStar energy efficient version. I only regret I didn't buy the 2 speed instead of the single speed. I also have a WhisperFlo that is OK but uses more electricity and is noisier and the prefilter basket lid is much easier to unscrew on the TriStar.
 

Peter T

Member
Sep 24, 2009
20
ttmatsu,
yeah, I got my reality check after posting my Q and then looking at prices online. I'm willing to pay the $1500 as I know it's a long term investment but I just didn't know enough and so was skeptical of spending that amount.
So I'll start shopping for jandy or Pentair.
Thx for your sharing.

BTW, I just posted a new post asking about Hybrid-Pumps. I can't find much on them. Are their products good?

Peter
 

Peter T

Member
Sep 24, 2009
20
ttmatsu,
On another recent post you were also looking at a Hybrid X2 for yourself, "Well Scott, the guy that handles my pool repairs also said not to get the Hayward so I am down to the VF or the Hybrid X2."
Did you decide?
A rep for the company, who is a pool guy in their Carlsbad area, is quoting me $1650 installed. I don't understand pump mechanics enough, but he guarantees he can get it to run at no more than 3amps on my pool and save me at least $100 a month on my electric bill--that's 2/3 of my bill!!! Can a VF that's going to cost me $1800-$2000 installed do that? They also have a 3-year warranty vs 1-yr from everyone else.

Peter
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,880
Silver Spring, MD
Replacing a single speed pump with a variable speed pump can almost always save you 50% of your current pumps electrical usage, and sometimes more (occasionally far more). Saving 2/3rds of your entire electric bill (including household electrical usage) doesn't seem at all likely.
 

ttmatsu

Member
Apr 16, 2010
14
Escondido, CA
Don't want people to think I've disappeared or been rude not answering Peter - we PM'ed each other. Still playing with customization to the X2 before putting numbers up in a post.
 
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