Raypak RP2100 Cast Iron Header

FloopFloopian

Member
Jun 15, 2020
7
Las Vegas
Hi there,

I have a leak happening at the inlet of my old RP2100 heater with cast iron header. The outlet was replaced a while back for the same reason, but they could not get the bolts off the current one without fear or breaking everything, so they left it. I am having a hard time figuring out how they connected the CPVC in. It looks like they threaded a CPVC pipe into the flange with cement (Green)? They are telling me to get a new heater, and I'd rather not. I can do the work required if I can get the bolts off, just would rather someone else do it...but they won't. Either way, if I get this off and get the new parts...how is the pipe supposed to go in there? They did work on the pump when it went in as well and they used the same green cement rather than the unions. I didn't know that method was a "thing". At any rate, just trying to figure out the right way to securely connect to this type of header.

Thanks

IMG_20200615_113933.jpg
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
23,916
Looks like a standard threaded fitting. Cut the pipe and unscrew the fitting. Use a schedule 80 cpvc nipple to thread into the flange.
 

FloopFloopian

Member
Jun 15, 2020
7
Las Vegas
Looks like a standard threaded fitting. Cut the pipe and unscrew the fitting. Use a schedule 80 cpvc nipple to thread into the flange.

Thanks,

Is there any tape/glue/etc typically needed? Seems like a possibility of leaks just screwing the pipe in...? Is there anything NOT recommended as it's going to get hot. The one that's been redone in the picture with green cement is actually leaking a small amount already.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
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May 23, 2015
17,704
Tucson, AZ
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So if you hired me to do it, I would first make you sign a statement that I am released from all liability if the header gets damaged because honestly, sometimes equipment gets to point where it just needs to be sent to the trash heap.

But, since you desire not to spend money on a new heater, my front up approach would be to soak the bolt and thread of that flange with a product called Liquid Wrench and let it sit for 15-20mins. Then I’d take a long handled box wrench, put it on the bolt head and gently tap the end of the wrench with a mallet to try to loosen the bolt. As the bolt loosened up, I give it a few more sprays of liquid wrench and continue the gentle process of tapping the wrench handle and spraying until the bolt is out of the thread.

There’s probably a 20% chance of success in that with the more likely outcome of shearing the bolt head off .... but, like I said, my liability waiver would be in force to cover that eventuality....
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
23,916
The fittings should just unscrew.

I suspect that the flanges can be be replaced if necessary.

Use a schedule 80 CPVC nipple with teflon tape and pipe thread sealant.

As noted, the fittings are old and this might not go well, especially if you're not used to doing this type of work.

Do at your own risk.
 
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