Raccoon Feces In Pool

Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
Hi, I have been a salt water pool owner for about 11yrs now and this is the first time I have experience a raccoon using my pool as its latrine. My husband was able to remove the fecal matter from the pool but we did not get the fecal matter tested. We did have our pool guy shock the pool and it ran for 48hrs and he change out the filter cartridges. The CDC recommends draining the entire pool but my pool guy said he has never seen anyone do that before and he has been in this business for 25yrs. My main concern is the roundworms these raccoons carry in their fecal matter. I read chlorine doesn't kill those roundworms. I'm scared to get back into my pool now?
Has anyone raccoon fecal matter in their pool? did you drain the water out of your pool to clean it or did you just shock it and change out the filters? Advice please?

Thank You
 

Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
Thank you, glad to be here! I'm worried to death about getting in my pool now. Hope to hear from anyone who has been in this situation also.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,769
Tucson, AZ
This is the second thread on Raccoon Roundworm (Baylisascaris).


Not sure what to say. It’s fairly rare to get the infection and yes, chlorine is not effective. The last pool owner on here posting about it called all of their local and state agencies and no one knew what they were talking about. They eventually found a lab that could test fecal samples for it but I don’t think they had enough material for the testing to be reliable. They were going to try the two-part clarifier system (PRS Stage 1 & 2) from SeaKlear to help remove fine particles but I don't know if they tried it or not. You can certainly drain your pool if it makes you feel better but I agree that it's a bit extreme.
 
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Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
Thank you for your reply. I really don't want to drain the pool. I guess its rare if this is only the second post on raccoon feces. Certainly it does happen but it might not be that big of a deal. I don't know much about the two part clarifier system from SeaKlear but I will look into that. Thank you all for your replies :)
 

frogabog

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2010
2,834
Portland, Oregon
Racoons are super dirty little creatures. Had a family coming in the dog door last year (old house) and they'd eat up all the cat food and then wash themselves in the water bowl. It left a lot of actual dirt in the bowl and little black hand/foot prints all over the floor around it. I dunno how much bacteria is on their dirty little hands and faces but there's plenty of actual dirt. Raising FC can't hurt if they're washing themselves in your pool. I wonder if they're swimming in it and just happened to have to poop while recreating rather than using it as a latrine.

It doesn't appear to be a regular thing for the other poster or really anyone else so far so it might also be a one time thing for you as well. If you still have enough of the poo sample, you could send it off for testing.
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
I personally can't imagine a land animal taking a dump in water. Now Canada geese, on the other hand... That I can imagine. They leave feces that looks like a medium sized dog came through.

Another consideration -- is your pool above ground or in ground? In ground, and I can see raccoons getting to the water. Above ground, not so much. Add in pooping in the pool, and it spells some flying visitor like a large duck or Canada goose.

Don't assume a coon befouled your pool unless you saw him cop a squat with your own eyes. That means you don't have to worry about the ooooh boogey bear roundworms.

Just clean up the solid matter, being the pool up to SLAM levels, and don't swim for 24 hrs. That should take care of your 💩 problems.
 
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JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,769
Tucson, AZ
Yeah, I thought that raccoons aren’t “stealth poopers” but prefer to have a communal latrine that the group uses. So I would agree that a one-off fecal incident doesn’t really say raccoon to me ....
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
In general, predatory land animals won't foul their water. I have never heard of coons pooping in the water they use for washing. Predators just don't do that. Herbivores, on the other hand... They're prone to going in their water and dirtying it up. Cows are really disgusting.

Birds will go in the water with great alacrity. We used to have a lake, which drew Canada geese and all kinds of ducks. My husband used to ask why I didn't swim in the lake and not use the pool. I gave him the stink eye over that. All those birds and the fish, constantly fertilizing the lake? No thank you. I'll stick with my nice clean pool.

And don't forget snapping turtles! They can lay pipe that looks just like dog or goose poop! I'm talking about the little baby ones, too! If you live in snapper territory, near a lake or stream, there's another culprit you want to consider, if you have an inground pool and find dog size 💩 in there.

It ain't always the furry bandits, y'all.
 
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Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
Thank you all for your comments. I have an in ground pool and a fence along my property. We did not see the Raccoon pooping but we know we have had this raccoon frequent our property. We have not seen any turtles or birds like geese around, so that is why we assumed it was a raccoon. I read that they do like to hide their poo and that is my they could go in the pool. It makes sense that they would not want to drink and wash in the same water but it could happen. I don't have the feces to get test anymore but I was going to try to get the pool water test for that specific roundworm. I've had no luck finding a lab that would test that specific roundworm yet.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,769
Tucson, AZ
Thank you all for your comments. I have an in ground pool and a fence along my property. We did not see the Raccoon pooping but we know we have had this raccoon frequent our property. We have not seen any turtles or birds like geese around, so that is why we assumed it was a raccoon. I read that they do like to hide their poo and that is my they could go in the pool. It makes sense that they would not want to drink and wash in the same water but it could happen. I don't have the feces to get test anymore but I was going to try to get the pool water test for that specific roundworm. I've had no luck finding a lab that would test that specific roundworm yet.
It would be impossible to get the water tested. Even if the feces contained millions of eggs, the volume of water is enormous and the chances of capturing enough eggs in a reasonable size water sample would be next to impossible. There are also few labs capable of detecting that type of pathogen and the standard protocol is to use a fecal sample. Any lab testing for it would have no protocol available for testing a water sample.
 

Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
I thought about that but thank you for verifying that it would be next to impossible. I will just take my chances then and go in the pool and see if I catch anything!
 

Shirker

Well-known member
Jul 2, 2014
316
Athens, GA - USA
This CDC site says to filter water for 24 hours.


"Because Baylisascaris eggs are particularly tough, adding chlorine to the water will not kill them. If a lab test has confirmed that the raccoon was infected with Baylisascaris or you don’t know if the raccoon was infected because the raccoon’s feces were not tested, there are two options for cleaning your pool.
*Remember to close the pool to swimmers until you have finished cleaning the pool.

Option 1:

  • Filter the pool for a minimum of 24 hours and then backwash the pool filter.
  • Put on disposable gloves to replace the material doing the filtering (if possible). Double bag the discarded material in plastic garbage bags. Remove gloves and place them in the garbage bags. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water afterwards."
 

Jpoww

Member
Aug 25, 2019
7
Katy, Texas
Yes I read the CDC's site. I had the pool shocked and it ran for 48hrs and then we had the filter cartridges changed... my pool does not have the backwash feature. I can't backwash it.
and Option 2 is to drain it.
 

Cypress3

Member
Aug 15, 2012
12
Houston, Texas
I thought I had the same problem with my pool and went to extreme measures to catch the raccoon, set traps, electric wire around the pool, tarp over steps, steam cleaned filter cartridges only to eventually discover the culprit was a very large toad! You may have the same type of culprit.
 
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Pv2

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 14, 2013
441
south east Arizona
I thought I had the same problem with my pool and went to extreme measures to catch the raccoon, set traps, electric wire around the pool, tarp over steps, steam cleaned filter cartridges only to eventually discover the culprit was a very large toad! You may have the same type of culprit.
I live in a rather open house for most of the year. This summer we acquired a new pup, a small chi-doxy mix. She had a couple accidents eary on, but is doing pretty good. The other day I was moving some extraneous junk out of a corner and found a single "sample" hidden under the area. I was ready to give her a little nose in it scolding when I realized it was a big old toad dropping. I think they are a little harder to house break. 🤣