Question on backwashing DE filter

txborn

LifeTime Supporter
May 21, 2007
126
Carrollton, TX
#1
Hello, I have a Hayward DE6020 filter and according to the manual, you backwash for 2 minutes or until water runs clean then do the rinse setting for 20 seconds. Then add DE as per the table, which is 7.5 pounds. Neighbor has same filter and never adds that much - only 3 or 4 pounds as he says you don't get rid of all the DE.

Is there a general rule how much DE to add?

Thanks!
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
#2
txborn, I've been lazy and have not cross linked the info I've given on PF :oops: I'll give you a quick rundown (and hopefully sometime manage to put together something which could be 'stickied')
Both Hayward and your neighbor don't know how to care for a Hayward filter!! Hayward makes some great products, but they apparently have never had to care for them (I think the problem is that they have the engineers write the manuals, based on the models they wrote up, but have never even seen a swimming pool :evil: )

OK, for a multiport DE filter, the correct way to clean it is:

(TURN OFF THE PUMP ANY TIME YOU CHANGE MULTI-PORT POSITIONS!!!!!!!!!!!)

Turn the multiport ('multi' hereafter) to 'backwash' and run the pump until the water in the little bottle next to the waste port is ~ clear. Turn the multi to 'rinse' for ~ 15 seconds. Then repeat the 'backwash/ rinse' cycle 2-5 more times until the water, when on backwash, comes out ~ clear - rinse again. Now, as long as you don't have an algae problem, run the filter on 'filter' for ~30 sec. and backwash/ rinse again. At this point you have removed ~80% of the DE from your filter, so only add ~80% of the initial De required for your model, in your case it's 6 Lbs.

Be sure that you know how much DE you are adding! they make 1 lb DE scoops which is the easiest way or you can weigh whatever scoop you use to know that you are adding the correct amount -- not putting enough DE or adding too much will cause performsnce problems which could require disassembling the filter to solve
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
#3
Waste, I agree yours is the best way, and how I do it, but couldn't one also monitor their pump pressure when adding the de after backwashing and stopping when they hit the known pressure of a clean start up of DE?

And best thing I ever did (besides find these forums :) ) is get a made for DE scoop. Best $4 I ever spent. No more guessing games :)
 

txborn

LifeTime Supporter
May 21, 2007
126
Carrollton, TX
#4
I really appreciate the replies and advice from this great forum :) I will get some DE today and backwash.

Waste, no algae problems here so I will do filter for 30 seconds. I have a digital scale I use for making sausages that I can set to zero after setting a bucket on top and it is accurate to a tenth of an ounce. I will probably get a scoop and check it against the scale so I won't have to break it out each time.

Mark
 

txborn

LifeTime Supporter
May 21, 2007
126
Carrollton, TX
#5
Um....there is no "Rinse" position on the valve. :shock: There is Filter, Spa Boost (not connected), Waste and Backwash.

About a minute into backwashing, the pump basket started filling with air so I shut it off. Any recommendations?
 

Buggsw

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 22, 2007
925
Arizona
#6
I never had a rinse option on my old DE filter, either.

I just backwashed until clear.
Set the valve for filter and ran pump for a few seconds.
Then backwashed again until clear.

repeating 3 times of backwashing.

Then reloaded the DE in the skimmer. My initial load was 10 lbs of DE and further post backwash skimmer loads was only 5 scoops, using a 1lb coffee can. Worked well for me.
 

txborn

LifeTime Supporter
May 21, 2007
126
Carrollton, TX
#7
Buggs, the Hayward valve even says "For Hayward Pro-Grid DE Filters Only" Funny how the manual even says set to Rinse!

I have to refill the pool a little before I continue. I ran it too long and water went below skimmer line :oops:
 

SunEnterprises

In The Industry
Jun 20, 2007
8
Virginia, USA
#10
I am not very familiar with the DE filters and I have a question hopefully somebody will know the answer to. Somebody told me that the material used in the DE filters can be somewhat hazardous and is treated similar to asbestos. Does anybody know if this is true/accurate. thanks so much.
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
#11
If there's a risk I would imagine it's from the fine particulate nature of DE, not anything toxic.

Avoid breathing in the dust and you should be fine.
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
#12
DE is a very fine dust that can get into the air fairly easily, particuarly when the humidity is low. You do not want to breathe it in. A simple surgical face mask or wood workers resperator will protect you.
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
#13
Rangeball said:
Waste, I agree yours is the best way, and how I do it, but couldn't one also monitor their pump pressure when adding the de after backwashing and stopping when they hit the known pressure of a clean start up of DE?

And best thing I ever did (besides find these forums :) ) is get a made for DE scoop. Best $4 I ever spent. No more guessing games :)
Rangeball, while the 'check the gauge method' would probably work for a while, I don't think it would be accurate enough :(

The trouble is that the fabric on the grids will eventually get clogged by oils, calcium etc so there will be a slow build-up of pressure due to the fabric being 'clogged'. Yes, on a new filter, it would probably be a decent way to insure a proper coating of DE on the grids, but any algae or chem problem could throw that method off. It's discussed elsewhere, but regular chemical cleaning of the DE grids is necessary for proper filtration.
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
#14
waste said:
regular chemical cleaning of the DE grids is necessary for proper filtration.
I wasn't aware of that. I thought it was only for when you had problems.

How often is this generally recommended per season for general maintenance?
 

DavidD

Well-known member
Mar 29, 2007
91
#15
My last Perflex DE filter (Hayward) recommended soaking and a dilution of muratic and water once per season. I usually did it when closing and never had any problems. It was amazing how clean and white they were after the soak.

Dave
 

Backglass

Well-known member
Jun 4, 2007
146
Putnam County, NY
#17
Lenny said:
What does the rinse setting do, anyway? I have one but haven't used it.
I don't know about DE, but on a sand filter, "Rinse" is the same as "Filter" except the water goes to waste. This is to flush out any remnants that might otherwise go into your pool..the "poof" of dirt on startup.
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
#18
The chemical cleaning I was talking about was a 2 part cleaning:
1- Soak the grids/ fingers in either a TSP or electric dishwasher powder solution for ~ 1 - 2 hrs (this is degreasing the fabric)
2- soak them in a dilute acid solution

The trouble with #2 is that you have to gauge the soaking based upon how strong the mixture is. Hayward recommends a 1:1 solution! :shock: You also have to remember that there are some metal parts that the acid will quickly attack! It can be done safely and efficiently, but you've got to be sure that you are doing it safely!!

(also, the 'RINSE' cycle clears out the tank and keeps the 'crud' from clinging to uncoated grids)