Pump and Heater Wired together through DPST switch

kefjens

Active member
Jul 25, 2011
34
0
Michigan
#1
Good afternoon. After having an above ground pool for about 10 years and using TFP to help maintain it, we then subsequently moved into a house without a pool. After one full summer without a pool we decided to have an inground built last spring. The installer brought a two speed pump (Hayward SP2135X202 which not specified in the contract so it felt like a bonus) and the way the pool builders' electrician wired it was only on high speed. I'd like to add a DPDT switch to control the speeds. The issue is they also wired the heater in to the same DPST switch as the pump.

So what I have is a T104 timer with the #2/4 lugs being L1/L2 source wires going through conduit to a single gang box with a DPST switch, the load side of the DPST switch has two wires each on L1/L2 terminals with one going to each the pump and the heater. This makes it so the on/off switch controls both the heater and the pump. My though was to pigtail the source L1/L2 in the single gang box running one set out directly to the heater and another to a DPDT switch and then to the pump (adding a third 12ga thhn wire for lo speed). Assuming I don't exceed the box fill, are there any concerns with this plan? The heater (Hayward H250) has a pressure switch so it "shouldn't" run without the pump running.

Any recommendations for a 20a DPDT switch to use in the single gang box?

The T104 also has a second set of L1/L2 under the 2/4 terminals going to the SWCG or I might have thought to pull a new set of wires from the heater through the single gang and back to the timer. All of the electrical is mounted to the masonry wall of the house so it's not quite as easy to reconfigure the boxes.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

CJadamec

TFP Expert
Apr 29, 2016
2,192
0
Quaker Hill, CT
#2
The easiest thing to do is to get a switch that mounts on the pump.


Or you should add a second speed selector switch down stream of your current pump/heater on off switch.

Its not a good idea to rely on only the flow switch to turn a gas heater on and off. The flow switch is a safety back up not a primary on/off switch.
 

kefjens

Active member
Jul 25, 2011
34
0
Michigan
#4
I'm going to go with chuck's suggestion. I think that will be the best way to achieve what I want to do. I keep considering going with automation but I like the reliability of the T104. If I do someday automate the valves for the waterfalls/returns, I'll then need to automate the pump speeds as well....hoping more z-wave dpdt devices come out soon.

Thanks for the advice!