Professional method for pump installation

Titanium

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 26, 2007
441
SF Bay Area
Hello,

My existing filter pump burned out a couple of weeks ago, and I am going to buy either an IntelliFlo 4x160 or an Ikeric Dyna-Miser VS150 tomorrow. The IntelliFlo is undoubtedly more efficient on the motor side than the Ikeric, but the Ikeric uses a very common motor, unlike the IntelliFlo. The only thing I don't like about the Ikeric is that the motor is ODP (open drip proof) as compared to the IntelliFlo being TEFC (totally enclosed, fan-cooled), but my existing ODP motor lasted in the outdoors and the rain and filter drainings for 11 years. The final decision will come down to relative price.

The title above refers to professional installation methods for the pump, but I think I am looking for "better than professional" installation tips since the "professionals" who installed the replacement pump 11 years ago never bothered to fasten the motor to the concrete equipment pad. The pump merely sits there and is "held" in place only by the inlet and outlet PVC piping.

What is the best way to install the new pump on the equipment pad? Should I install a rubber base under the pump? Should I be bolting the pump to the equipment pad?

Also, I am pretty sure that the IntelliFlo (which uses a WhisperFlo wet-end) and the Ikeric (which now uses a Hayward TriStar wet-end) will not match the piping for the existing Hayward Super II pump. Any tips for redoing the piping, other than installing unions? I am familiar with dry-fitting the piping before gluing, but it seems that after gluing that the fittings never quite fit like they did during the dry-fitting. How do the professionals handle retrofit plumbing jobs where the final piping dimensions must match up perfectly with existing equipment and existing piping?

Thanks for any thoughts, ideas, criticisms, etc.

Titanium
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
I am not a PVC expert but I have done some plumbing. PVC joints almost never go in all the way when dry fitting, so dry fitting is of limited use. The basic plan is to figure out where the final joint is going to be and work one piece at a time from both ends towards there. If space is limited you really want a union, otherwise it will be nearly impossible to get the final joint together. If you have more room you can place the final joint somewhere there will be a fair amount of flex available so you can get the joint together.

A rubber mat and short sections of radiator hose are sometimes used as sound isolation, so sounds don't transmit from the pump to the ground or pipes, though this isn't really all that common.
 

Titanium

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 26, 2007
441
SF Bay Area
JasonLion,

Thank you for the reply and the tips for modifying the PVC plumbing.

Does everyone leave the pump loose on the equipment pad, or is anyone bolting the pump down onto the concrete?

Titanium
 
G

Guest

Titanium said:
JasonLion,

Thank you for the reply and the tips for modifying the PVC plumbing.

Does everyone leave the pump loose on the equipment pad, or is anyone bolting the pump down onto the concrete?

Titanium
mine sits in two cinder blocks, not bolted down and both the pump and filter dont sit ona pad, just cinderblock, in an old shack with rotton wood and i looks like if i kick it, it will fall over.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
32,863
Sebring, Florida
Does everyone leave the pump loose on the equipment pad, or is anyone bolting the pump down onto the concrete?
Interesting question....I don't know the answer. I chose (perhaps unwisely) to leave mine unbolted when I installed it.

My thinking was that I knew it would be close to impossible to relieve all tension on the PVC If I bolted it down. I decided I would rather have the pump free to seek the spot where the PVC would be under the least "bind".

At least in this case, it has worked well for five years....no leaks....pump disconnected and reconnected at least twice during that time. (I used unions)
 

stevenbrla

LifeTime Supporter
May 10, 2007
237
Baton Rouge, LA
FWIW,

my pump was unprofessionally installed by a supposed professionals. they didn't bolt it down, and based on their other work, I could almost guarantee you that if they had, they would've screwed it up.

anyway... I've got 4x160, and it is so quiet and vibration-free that I really think bolting it down would be much overkill. Depending on the rpm setting and ANY surrounding noise, sometimes you have to put your hand on it to feel it to determine if its on.

my booster (cleaner) pump and my spa jet pump (3hp whisperflo) aren't bolted down either and both seem to be okay, with no excessive vibration or movement.

if it were me, I'd try it first w/o securing it, then go from there if you see a need to...

good luck!!
 

Hotrod30

Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Dec 22, 2007
504
Central New York
Mine sits on two cinder blocks, on a rubber pad; not bolted down. Connects to the inlet and outlet by unions. Never had a bit of trouble. When rehooking up the pump; it helps to have some movement to hook up the unions.