Poolside Plants

Leik

Member
Mar 19, 2018
10
Wichita Falls, TX
#21
Seeing as that swatch of mulch is approximately 4ft away, (hard to tell from the pictures) a row of arborvitaes on the left and right side of your pool would offer you some privacy once fully matured.
By planting them closer to the pool, (instead of along the fence) when they grow to their mature height, usually 12-14ft, your neighbors won’t be able to see you easily. (It’s sort of like taking a piece of paper and holding it in front of your face, you can’t really see much around it. Now take that piece of paper and hold it at arms length, now you can see around it):cheers:
Exactly. This is what they do at Disneyworld and Disneyland, especially, since Annaheim has sewn them in. That close will still provide a nice screen.
 
#22
If you still have some cash left, you might consider getting a local landscape architect for help. If he knows your requirements, he (she) can draw a plan to accomplish what you need. In the long run it might save you money and problems. We did it the other way--got the landscape architect before the pool, but he put in a place holder for the pool, and his plants were all pool friendly. In a couple cases, we deviated from his recommended plants. Our mistake.
 
OP
OP
SpaceDog
Oct 9, 2018
18
Cary, NC
#24
If you still have some cash left, you might consider getting a local landscape architect for help. If he knows your requirements, he (she) can draw a plan to accomplish what you need. In the long run it might save you money and problems. We did it the other way--got the landscape architect before the pool, but he put in a place holder for the pool, and his plants were all pool friendly. In a couple cases, we deviated from his recommended plants. Our mistake.
This might be a good plan. The last time we did this, we got stuck with someone who wouldn't furnish the plan if we didn't use them to execute it. We'll be more careful if we go this way again.

Also of consideration is nitrates getting onto the pool. Plantings that don't need much fertilizer would be on my list of priorities.
I'm totally on board with this. I'm a fan of xeriscaping: low maintenance, perennial, self sustaining plants.