Poolside Plants

Leik

Silver Supporter
Mar 19, 2018
36
Wichita Falls, TX
Seeing as that swatch of mulch is approximately 4ft away, (hard to tell from the pictures) a row of arborvitaes on the left and right side of your pool would offer you some privacy once fully matured.
By planting them closer to the pool, (instead of along the fence) when they grow to their mature height, usually 12-14ft, your neighbors won’t be able to see you easily. (It’s sort of like taking a piece of paper and holding it in front of your face, you can’t really see much around it. Now take that piece of paper and hold it at arms length, now you can see around it):cheers:
Exactly. This is what they do at Disneyworld and Disneyland, especially, since Annaheim has sewn them in. That close will still provide a nice screen.
 

BowserB

Silver Supporter
Jul 29, 2018
141
Katy, Texas
If you still have some cash left, you might consider getting a local landscape architect for help. If he knows your requirements, he (she) can draw a plan to accomplish what you need. In the long run it might save you money and problems. We did it the other way--got the landscape architect before the pool, but he put in a place holder for the pool, and his plants were all pool friendly. In a couple cases, we deviated from his recommended plants. Our mistake.
 

SpaceDog

Member
Oct 9, 2018
23
Cary, NC
If you still have some cash left, you might consider getting a local landscape architect for help. If he knows your requirements, he (she) can draw a plan to accomplish what you need. In the long run it might save you money and problems. We did it the other way--got the landscape architect before the pool, but he put in a place holder for the pool, and his plants were all pool friendly. In a couple cases, we deviated from his recommended plants. Our mistake.
This might be a good plan. The last time we did this, we got stuck with someone who wouldn't furnish the plan if we didn't use them to execute it. We'll be more careful if we go this way again.

Also of consideration is nitrates getting onto the pool. Plantings that don't need much fertilizer would be on my list of priorities.
I'm totally on board with this. I'm a fan of xeriscaping: low maintenance, perennial, self sustaining plants.
 

Michelle30276

Active member
Apr 13, 2018
34
Senoia Ga
How about some of the ornamental grasses to hide the equip? Or even a few arborvitae trees in front of it. I’ve got a similar situation. We planted a couple of southern lace hinoki cypress. I am regretting the placement of my equipment now. May end up building some type of attractive fencing barrier.
 

MIpoolAL

Bronze Supporter
Jul 15, 2017
21
Clarkston,MI
Depending on climate and how much shade is there, Hostas might do well. Looks like you have a great deal of area to fill, so some variety in types, sizes and height might do well.

Maybe some stepping stones for easy walking through to the pool equipment ?

Boxwoods would make a nice hedge if you dont mind the smell.
 

bmoreswim

Mod Squad
Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2012
5,420
Central MD
Looks nice! If you can kill the yuccas, you get a reward. They are tough. That looks like Yucca Color Guard. Though my only suggestion is to cut off the yucca flower stalks immediately after blooming so they don't go to seed. The seed production process does sap them of energy which is especially needed for young transplants.
 

djust

Silver Supporter
Jun 22, 2016
81
Edmond, Oklahoma
Didn't know that about the yucca flower stalks, we were trying to stay with things that need close to the same amount of water.
The concrete was poured through a curbing machine then hand formed and stained to look somewhat natural.
 

jwhop3

Well-known member
Jun 9, 2014
138
Rocky Mount/Virginia
We installed our pool in the fall with a large stamped concrete patio and a retaining wall. On 3 sides of the patio (those without the wall) we have about 2' of mulch surrounding the patio. I'm looking for recommendations for best plants and shrubbery for this area. We live in NC, so while we have winter it's usually relatively mild or with a few storms. We have a long summer season.

I'm also looking for recommendations about plantings that can hide the equipment area.

Any advise is much appreciated.

Thank you!
You cannot go wrong with Hostas. Also, try mint (in planters), lemongrass, and calladiums.
 

chking1

Bronze Supporter
Sep 12, 2017
20
Bristol, VA
We just recently planted a couple of Windmill Palms. They are the most cold hardy palm available. Nice accent for the pool area and will not create any mess. Here’s a few pictures from the planting yesterday.
@Leik

Nice!

Quick question, what color stain is on your fence/building?
 

Mr. Scott

Member
Aug 4, 2019
18
NJ
Another nice plant are Musa Basjoo, aka cold hardy bananas. Very easy to grow, but give them room as they can get very big. Personally I don't bother to hide my filter equipment, I am proud of it and want it to be seen, probably because I am a geahead LOL.