Pool Renovation

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
We just purchased the home and are going to renovate the entire pool, deck and add an outdoor kitchen. I need some guidance. Never had a pool before. Please excuse me if I use the wrong terms.

Here is some background info:
Located in Houston
Have 2 year old
Pool was originally installed in 1979
Has 2 pumps. 1 is cleaner pump. 1 main drain and 2 drains in a small seating area.
Chlorine
Perimeter is 120 ft. depth 3.5ft to 7.5ft.
Deck is concrete. Brushed finish done at different times and does not match. Exposed aggregate around pool. A 20ft portion of exposed has sunk down 2 inches. Total patio is ~ 2000 sqft.
Coping is in good condition.
Pool surface needs to be redone
Heater is rusted and cannot be fixed

Here is what I want to do:
Resurface pool. Dark color. Looking at quartscape St Martin color.
New waterline tile. Looking at glass.
Replace broken pool light.
Replace heater.
Do something with the patio so it looks nice but do not want to drop 20k on patio alone. Budget is around 5-6k for patio

We thought about doing it right away but with pool builder busy right now we decided to enjoy it this summer and start the work in 3-4 months. Looking ~9K to resurface and add tile with epoxy.

My big dilemma is what to do with the patio. I want it all to flow. all the concrete is in good shape except for the part that has sunk. I spoke with a couple people and stamping is too expensive quoted 20k alone. I want to do something that looks good and keep it under 6k. I am looking at stain and paint but unsure about the aggregate part that goes around the pool.

Any advice is welcome.

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 8.39.52 AM.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 8.40.07 AM.jpg



IMG_7245.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 8.44.34 AM.jpg
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
The first thing I would do is find out WHY that sank there. If there was a water problem that caused erosion then you will need to fix that. If there was settling then you will need to fix that. You MIGHT be able to "jack" it back up once you find out why it sank.

Patio-I would NOT paint it. Paint will not "stay". After a while it will (notice I did not say may) start wearing and/or chipping. You will have a bigger mess on your hands. For the staining you might have to go a little darker to help the two areas match.

Plaster-we have seen the darker plasters have problems with mottling if the skills of the installers are not up to par :( Just wanted to make you aware so you can make sure to vet the installers to make sure they are from the A group!

2 yr old child....you need a safety fence between the house and pool. They make some that can be removed later. Do you already have alarms on the doors and windows? We can give you ideas for what kind of fence to get.

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
Thanks Kim. Yes I guess the fence needs to be number 1 priority. We move in next week and that was the first thing I was going to do. My plan is to install one like below where I put the red line or I would go all the way around the pool leaving some sitting areas within the gate. Any better fences out there or placement I should look into? Should I go around the pool? I was concerned it would be difficult to remove when we have guest over...

https://www.amazon.com/Sentry-Safety-Pool-Fence-Removable/dp/B002QS57Q6

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 8.26.45 PM.jpg
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
That red line is just what I was thinking. It is another "link in the safety chain" to keep your child safe. The locks and alarms on the doors and windows will tell you if they go outside. The fence will slow them down at the least, stop them at the best.

Now something else for you to think about........I see a pretty, black lab in one of the pics......they ARE going to be in and out of the pool if there is no fence all the way around the pool. They will be one of the cleanest labs in town LOL Also letting the dog out into the yard. With the red line fence you will have to go out to over the fence gate to let them out.

After reading all of this what are your thoughts?

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
That red line is just what I was thinking. It is another "link in the safety chain" to keep your child safe. The locks and alarms on the doors and windows will tell you if they go outside. The fence will slow them down at the least, stop them at the best.

Now something else for you to think about........I see a pretty, black lab in one of the pics......they ARE going to be in and out of the pool if there is no fence all the way around the pool. They will be one of the cleanest labs in town LOL Also letting the dog out into the yard. With the red line fence you will have to go out to over the fence gate to let them out.

After reading all of this what are your thoughts?

Kim:kim:

I decided to get the DIY pool fence and gate and put it on the red line I posted. It will still give the dogs plenty of room to go do their business. I can always change it up to go all around the pool if we change our mind.

Now onto pool deck. How do I check if there is or was a leak or settle problem under the sunken part of the deck? 2 Jets do blow out a small amount of bubbles...

Thanks!
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
What I would do is see if you can figure out where the plumbing lines run from the pad to the pool. Is the lower part any where near one of the returns or skimmer?

When you say "jets" do you mean the eyeball looking things where the water jets out from the filter into the pool?

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
Yes by jets I mean where filtered pool water comes into the pool. What is the correct term I should use?

I added a photo showing sunken deck and pool pumps. There are "jets" where water comes into the pool located by the sunken deck.

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 8.26.45 PM.jpg
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
The correct terms is "returns" as they return the water to the pool. I used the term jets in the beginning as well.

Is that area wet at all? Do you think you could take a picture hat shows the bubbles?

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
The correct terms is "returns" as they return the water to the pool. I used the term jets in the beginning as well.

Is that area wet at all? Do you think you could take a picture hat shows the bubbles?

Kim:kim:

No area is not wet. Here is picture of the bubbles from the pool inspection. Not sure if it clear enough to see.

Screen Shot 2018-06-20 at 5.00.19 PM.jpg
 

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kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
Very good pic. This could be as simple as the o-ring in the pump lid needing some lube on it to there being an air leak in the lines. It is something we will have trace when you can be at the house trying this and that. Do yo have access to the house at all yet?

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
Very good pic. This could be as simple as the o-ring in the pump lid needing some lube on it to there being an air leak in the lines. It is something we will have trace when you can be at the house trying this and that. Do yo have access to the house at all yet?

Kim:kim:

Yes but I have been giving the previous owners their privacy. We move in next weekend. I will be out there next week to get trees cut back. What should I check or do first to find the source of the bubbles?
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
Here is one link: Air bubbles coming from returns

There are many. I just put in "what causes bubbles out of a return".

For the o-rings use something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Lube-tube-2-Pack-ring-Lubricant/dp/B07BGBS5TR/ref=asc_df_B07BGBS5TR/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=241973227623&hvpos=1o5&hvnetw=g&hvrand=93101654668359699&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9011580&hvtargid=pla-437129000311&psc=1 (I just grabbed the first link I found). You can find it at Lowes and Home Depot. You might end up at the pool store if you cannot find it there.

Kim:kim:
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
We moved in and fence was first thing on the to do list. It's up. I tried last 30 minutes to reduce size of photo to put online but cannot get it smaller than 100kb. Any suggestion to post pictures or is this forum not meant to post pictures?

BTW its storming bad hear and made me think. What do I do if pool level comes up to much? Drain it? And what is the appropriate water level?
 

SuzfromTexas

Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Guide
Apr 7, 2015
3,365
Houston, Texas
Hi Bcoastal, I just looked at your thread for the first time. I guess it was meant to be.

I made it through Harvey, so I think I can help. I'm in Cypress or NW of Houston. The storms haven't reached us yet. I'm on alert, since flood warnings are possible over the next few days.

Do you have an overflow drain?

I'm ready to help.
Suz
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
49,078
Tallahassee, FL
Since Suz has you covered with the water level I will help with the pics.

There are two ways to post more pics (we LOVE pics!!!)
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we get to feed the servers and keep them updated.

-You can find a 3rd party hosting site that is NOT photobucket (they have started charging)

Kim:kim:
 

SuzfromTexas

Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Guide
Apr 7, 2015
3,365
Houston, Texas
Bcoastal, I'm hoping no news (or questions) means good news. Just in case, I'm posting some notes I made in a post during Hurricane Harvey. It's an accumulation of my learned experiences and the wonderful advice and quotes that night from others who were awake when panic set in! Lol!!!

It's a lot of info, but I don't know what you need or don't need. Good luck! You have my # in case you need immediate phone help!

Suz


Precautions and Procedures during heavy floods

When the rain is coming down multiple inches by the hour, an overflow drain may not maintain the pool water level. For some people that could mean water coming into the back of the house.

Appropriate water level in the pool:
Normal circumstances: halfway up the skimmer, give or take an inch or so.
Torrential rains: WITH an overflow drain, keep watch on the rate of rainfall and water level rise. Often the overflow drain will keep up. If the water is lapping under the coping and is not holding, get busy preparing for another way to drain water from the pool.
WITHOUT an overflow drain, don’t wait until the water level is lapping the coping.
It’s an individual call on when to act. Experience with your pool and with your area’s downpours makes it an easier decision.


1. hose bib/spigot to drain water from the pool: Open up the spigot between the filter and main pump. If that's an unwise place to drain, see #3. Respect your neighbors and drain away from their property. If you need to drain faster to keep up with rain fall, attach hoses to each spigot from other pumps you may have.

2. Important***** pump must be on: with my equipment, we kept the pump on high to get the greatest flow out of the hose. When the pump was on low, it was very low flow out of the hose. Use the speed that gives you a margin of safety from the pool overflowing.

3. where to drain: you can attach your garden hose to the spigot and drain to a better place - driveway, street, etc. In the Hurricane Harvey situations, we could not have used our deck drains to put the hose end (the deck drains that run to the street). Our street was a rushing river, so my logic (correct or not) said that water with no place to go would all back up in the deck drains. Then the rainfall on the deck couldn't drain. I could very likely be wrong about that. We ran the hoses to our long driveway which has a decent slope and no chance of pooling near the house. We didn't help the rushing street river.....

4. swg system: Turn off the salt system. There’s no point using up your cell as your pool water drains down the street. Some systems may allow you to turn it off; others you simply turn the % level down to zero.

5. a bleach pool: don't forget if you have a swg system turned off, you now need to watch the FC level. As others have said, take it up to SLAM level or at least high enough to give you wiggle room for timing of testing (using the band breaks from the storm to get out there and test or simply add more bleach)

6. skimmers: if you're dealing with storms that have bands as with hurricanes or tropical storms, use the break periods from the rain to get the debris out of the skimmers to keep the flow going well.


Alternate Methods to Drain a Pool

1. filters that drain to waste (not cartridge filters): turn valves to waste

2. sump pump: if you have one available and have power, throw that into the pool

3. the old siphon method:
"You know, like you used to use when you stole gas from your neighbor's car...
Fill a garden hose with water and then put one end of a garden hose in the pool and the other end down hill somewhere.."
 

bcoastal

Member
Jul 5, 2017
20
houston/tx
Bcoastal, I'm hoping no news (or questions) means good news. Just in case, I'm posting some notes I made in a post during Hurricane Harvey. It's an accumulation of my learned experiences and the wonderful advice and quotes that night from others who were awake when panic set in! Lol!!!

It's a lot of info, but I don't know what you need or don't need. Good luck! You have my # in case you need immediate phone help!

Suz


Precautions and Procedures during heavy floods

When the rain is coming down multiple inches by the hour, an overflow drain may not maintain the pool water level. For some people that could mean water coming into the back of the house.

Appropriate water level in the pool:
Normal circumstances: halfway up the skimmer, give or take an inch or so.
Torrential rains: WITH an overflow drain, keep watch on the rate of rainfall and water level rise. Often the overflow drain will keep up. If the water is lapping under the coping and is not holding, get busy preparing for another way to drain water from the pool.
WITHOUT an overflow drain, don’t wait until the water level is lapping the coping.
It’s an individual call on when to act. Experience with your pool and with your area’s downpours makes it an easier decision.


1. hose bib/spigot to drain water from the pool: Open up the spigot between the filter and main pump. If that's an unwise place to drain, see #3. Respect your neighbors and drain away from their property. If you need to drain faster to keep up with rain fall, attach hoses to each spigot from other pumps you may have.

2. Important***** pump must be on: with my equipment, we kept the pump on high to get the greatest flow out of the hose. When the pump was on low, it was very low flow out of the hose. Use the speed that gives you a margin of safety from the pool overflowing.

3. where to drain: you can attach your garden hose to the spigot and drain to a better place - driveway, street, etc. In the Hurricane Harvey situations, we could not have used our deck drains to put the hose end (the deck drains that run to the street). Our street was a rushing river, so my logic (correct or not) said that water with no place to go would all back up in the deck drains. Then the rainfall on the deck couldn't drain. I could very likely be wrong about that. We ran the hoses to our long driveway which has a decent slope and no chance of pooling near the house. We didn't help the rushing street river.....

4. swg system: Turn off the salt system. There’s no point using up your cell as your pool water drains down the street. Some systems may allow you to turn it off; others you simply turn the % level down to zero.

5. a bleach pool: don't forget if you have a swg system turned off, you now need to watch the FC level. As others have said, take it up to SLAM level or at least high enough to give you wiggle room for timing of testing (using the band breaks from the storm to get out there and test or simply add more bleach)

6. skimmers: if you're dealing with storms that have bands as with hurricanes or tropical storms, use the break periods from the rain to get the debris out of the skimmers to keep the flow going well.


Alternate Methods to Drain a Pool

1. filters that drain to waste (not cartridge filters): turn valves to waste

2. sump pump: if you have one available and have power, throw that into the pool

3. the old siphon method:
"You know, like you used to use when you stole gas from your neighbor's car...
Fill a garden hose with water and then put one end of a garden hose in the pool and the other end down hill somewhere.."


Thanks. Sorry for late response. Today was crazy to say the least. New house and 4th of July is also my sons Birthday so lots of stuff to do.

And we got a lot of rain today. Our last home flooded during Harvey so I was having flashbacks while figuring out how to drain the pool thinking I could fill up our drainage system and flood our new house.

But I figured it out. Our pool does not have an overflow drain. Is that something I should check with the pb when we renovate?
 
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