Pool Remodel underway...Is this right?

FloridaBill

New member
Feb 18, 2011
3
Tampa Florida
Hi all. I'm doing a makeover on my pool and hope the experts here can lend an opinion. Among other things, I'm doing new deck pavers, coping, tile, pool resurfacing, etc. Today the protruding edge of the 4' concrete slab that served as the pool deck was cut back flush with the edge of the pool, allowing us to use regular coping instead of remodel coping. Some type of bonding material was then applied over the old tiles, which I assume will be smoothed down once it properly hardens to prepare a mounting surface for the new tile. I have absolutely no construction background, but it seems to me the old tiles should have been removed before this was done. So experts, what say ye: Yea or Nay? thanks.
 

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nhamp07

Bronze Supporter
Jul 24, 2018
128
New Braunfels, TX
Are they plastering over the old plaster or did they do a chip out? If they are plastering over the old plaster you have to account for that with the new tile as well. I could be wrong.
 

FloridaBill

New member
Feb 18, 2011
3
Tampa Florida
Here are excerpts from the proposal/contract:



Resurface Pool: Bluestone Color (Premix Marbletite Corporation, Marquis Series. Warranty is provided
by Premix Marbletite Corporation for a 10 year period from the install date.
see www.premixmarbletite.com for details
A. Drain pool
B. Pull hydrostatic plug in main drain
C. Saw cut line under existing water level tile (only if keeping old tile)
D. Chisel around pool returns
E. Knock out hollow spots in old marcite (up to 5% of surface area)
F. Apply bonding agent to entire pool area to insure proper adhesion of new finish
G. Apply marcite at a 3/8” minimum thickness to entire pool
H. Hand trowel to a smooth finish
I. Install new VGBA main drain(s)
J. Refill from owners water supply
K. Go over proper chemical levels with owner
Slight brushing after refil of the pool will be needed. Chemical balance is very important to a new finsih
and should be checked regularly. Keep PH low for the first month and brush pool to remove slight plaster
residue/ haze. Clean the filter weekly for the first month.
Variation in this finish is normal as it can take up to 9 months for the finsih to completely cure.
Plaster/cream spots may also be noticable as it is normal and common. They will hydrate and catch up and
are also part of the normal curing process. Brushing will help cure the finish and expose the cream spots if
are noticable as all hand troweled cement finishes are hand troweled/applied.
Option2: Eleminates 30 day curing process. we Chemical scrub to rinse off excess cement and haze to
expose aggregate before the pool is filled with water. Once the pool is filled there may still be plaster dust
in the pool. Slight brushing may still be needed to remove settled dust from the floor of the pool.Plus
Chemicals added to rebalance, Calcium 200 ppm Alkalinity 80-120ppm, PH 7.4-7.8, Stabilizer up to 20
ppm, First treatment of chlorine 2.0 ppm, DOES NOT INCLUDE SALT OPTION 2 IS EXTRA $ 200.00
CONVENIENCE FEE
3,800.00

Paver install: Prep surface, level with sand, install pavers over pool deck and add sand into joints to lock
and hold pavers tight together.
Install coping around the pool deck above the tile line, adhered to the deck and grouted between eachother.
grey or white is provided, a specailty grout color can be provided at an extra charge (pool and spa)
Install coping around the stairs adhere to the deck and grouted between each other. grey or white is
provided, a specailty grout color can be provided at an extra charge (stairs OPTIONAL)
Slab cut concrete, insert new 4" deep x 2" wide deco drain in concrete or between pavers, back fill channel
with grout or cement to hold drain in place. price is by the foot
Install 6x6 swimming pool tile RACU COBALT (non upgrade). This includes labor, setting material, and
white grout.
SQUARE LID COLLAR ASSY (TAN) CTM-251-1192
Miscellaneous concrerte work on edge of pool for cantaliever edge removal
Miscellaneous french drain and box with install and adaptors
7,475.00
2,340.00
1,620.00
2,250.00
2,312.50
50.99T
260.00


 

nhamp07

Bronze Supporter
Jul 24, 2018
128
New Braunfels, TX
Yeah it looks like they are just going on top of the old plaster and therefore just new tile on top. Im not sure if it is standard protocol to leave the old water line tile, but people tile over existing tile all the time inside.

Maybe @bdavis466 knows more.
 

bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
4,959
San Clemente, CA
Never seen that done in a pool before. You might want to get ahold of the bonding agent they used to see what it's specifically designed to do and where it can be used.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
535
MA
Paver install: Prep surface, level with sand, install pavers over pool deck and add sand into joints to lock
and hold pavers tight together.
What type of paver are you using?
How thick are the pavers?

It sounds like your new deck will be 2-3" higher then the old deck. Is that correct?

Have they considered any drainage issues this will create?

I would be curious on how or if they adjust the skimmer for proper operation. Will your new water level be 2-3" higher as well so it sits about mid-tile where you would expect to see it, or will you need to keep the water level the same so it is almost at the bottom of the tile?

I would suggest having them use polymeric sand for in between the pavers. It is more money but worth every dime in my opinion. They used it on my deck and I have - no weeds, no ants and no run off. The stuff just stays where it belongs.

I have no experience with putting tile over tile but my gut would say cement does not adhere well to shiny smooth surfaces.. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
535
MA
Never seen that done in a pool before. You might want to get ahold of the bonding agent they used to see what it's specifically designed to do and where it can be used.
Aside from the bonding to existing tile, It seems like they are taking a bit of a chance and assuming the original tiles are still well bonded. Knocking off the old tile does not sound like it would add much to the cost to ensure a good bond.

 

Elheffy22

Member
May 11, 2016
5
Rochester NY
Bad idea your existing tile, nothing sticks to it its almost like glass for example you cant bond anything to that tile. at bare minimum they should of hit the tile with a grinder to rough it up and take off the finish. Then you might have a fighting chance but if you go through that trouble why isnt it just removed. Not to mention usually with that mosaic tile it had a net backing and the net was the only thing that was stuck in the morter the tile usually blows right off, and the grout is the only thing that was holding it all together.
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
41,022
Tallahassee, FL
I have seen quite a few remodels and have never seen putting the tiles over old tiles. That looks like a problem waiting to happen :( Do yourself a favor. Go out to the pool with a flat head screwdriver. See how easy it is to scrape or pop a piece of that bonding material.