Pool Light - Adding a Neutral Wire for a TP Link KASA Switch

ienycei

New member
Jun 21, 2020
2
Orlando
Hello Everyone,

I have been reading through the threads and have found a lot of this information very informative.

I am trying to achieve the same result that many members are as well which is running a Neutral Wire into my pool light switch so that I can wire up a Smart Light Switch.

I wanted to know if I can please receive some guidance on my situation as well. I have labeled the wires in my breaker panel so that they are easily distinguishable. If you could please let me know how I should add on a Neutral wire I would greatly appreciate it.

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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
20,476
Northern NJ
Wrap black tape around both ends of the white switch wire to indicate it is a hot wire and not a neutral wire.

You need to run a white wire from the CB panel connected to the neutral bar to the switch.


  • White wire with black tape from the CB to TPLink Switch
  • Hot from other side of TP link switch to black wire in switch
  • Neutral of TP Link switch to new neutral wire

Both the lights and the electrical outlet is turned on and off by that switch. @tarunc82 had his switch after the GFCI and before the light. Your switch is placed between the CB power and the GFCI outlet.

I think that GFCI outlet is rated for 15 amps and connected to a 20 amp breaker. It should be changed to a 20 amp GFCI outlet.
 

ogdento

Bronze Supporter
Mar 30, 2015
581
Chico, CA
a couple of additions to Allen's points...
  • i can't read the markings, but your switch also appears to be rated for 15A (instead of 20)
  • this may cause a kerfuffle... but the NEC prohibits the use of romex in conduit, unless the conduit is specifically used for protection of an exposed cable (as in using conduit to protect romex that's running down a wall from a ceiling in a workshop - the romex isn't entirely enclosed in conduit). so... depending on the length of the run involved, i'd consider pulling out that romex and replacing it with individual 12 gauge THHN conductors (stranded is easier to pull), at which point you can add your neutral
 

ogdento

Bronze Supporter
Mar 30, 2015
581
Chico, CA
i initially said the NEC prohibits romex in conduit - and this seems to come up a lot - but i can't find a rule that says you definitely cannot (i am also not an electrician). in chico the inspectors won't allow it, but as long as you don't exceed the conduit fill (how many conductors you can put in conduit of a particular diameter) maybe it's fine? i can't tell how big that conduit is but if you were going to leave the romex you'd have to do the fill calculation with the romex cable and the additional neutral conductor.
 

ienycei

New member
Jun 21, 2020
2
Orlando
Thank you all for your assistance and guidance. Unfortunately I cannot access that side of attic to verify if there is conduit that extends from end to end. After reading many different conditions, I believe that conduit was used to go up the wall into the attic/eaves and that the conduit does not actually extend in the attic as well. Possibly this is why Romex is present? I’m not the original owner of the home (the home is 14 years old) but I do know that the pool was an add on 2 years after the house was built so in any case it had to be reviewed by an inspector.

I think the only way for me to confirm the conduit route is to run a fish tape through and see if shows up on the other end. Am I correct in my assumption?

if there truly is a gap in the conduit in the attic then would Romex be appropriate wiring or should it still be converted to single conductor wiring?

If Romex is okay in this situation my plan was to change out the 12-2 with 12-3 instead of just routing a single white neutral wire (with the assumption that there is no conduit in the attic)

Once again, great information from reading these threads.
 
Last edited:

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
20,476
Northern NJ
Romex is allowed in conduit, length is not an issue.

Romex is not allowed in wet locations. The inside of conduit in a wet location, such as outdoors, is considered a wet location.

You should run THWN black, red, and white wires. The red replacing the existing white wire which is a hot wire.
 
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