pool-krete and liner

rockyboy

Well-known member
Jul 13, 2007
175
It has been a while since my last post, but then again, my pool project has been going on since Aug 10th. We are in Oklahoma City and you may have noticed that the weather has not been great around here. The PB finished our pool-krete installation on a Friday night a couple of weeks ago and then we got ice Sat - Mon. Short version....after all the ice/melting/rain over the past two weeks, our new pool-krete is covered in water. The level is up to the light niche so it is full of water. I am concerned about two things: 1) will being under water hurt the new pool-krete installation and 2) will it be OK to install the liner with the temps not normally getting out of the 50's for the next several months. PB is planning to pump out the pool and install liner when the weather clears. Says everything will be fine. I am looking for a second...third or more opinion. Thanks in advance.
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
Rockyboy:

The water will actually let the 'pool base' set better (as long as there aren't 'rivulets' in the floor from the water). As a general rule, the slower the crete in the base sets, the stronger it will end up - water ~ delays the setting up process, however, too much too soon will wash away the cement :( As long as I'm on the subject - letting any kind of crete freeze before it sets is BAD :!: -- I'll admit that I don't fully know why, but any crete will be better off if it doesn't freeze in the first ~28 days. (though the damage may well be negligible - it's NOT optimal)

I've said elsewhere that liners can be dropped @ ~ 50 deg - but only if the installer KNOWS what they're doing - I would imagine that your installer is one of those who know when they can install the liner vs. when they can't. I will say that Sun will be ~ necessary for a ~ 50 deg liner drop! They will do this quickly, as they will have had the liner in a warm place, right up until it's installed - please make sure that the floor is smooth and free of debris, lest they have to come back next spring and drain the pool to correct any imperfections under the liner.

In short, as long as they've done a competent job so far, trust them to know how to do a liner when the temps are a 'little' lower than optimal -- you always have your contract/ warrantee to cover any corrections that need to be made in the spring
 

rockyboy

Well-known member
Jul 13, 2007
175
The PB has been in business around here for quite a while....under the same name! I will give him the benefit of the doubt BUT I realize that he needs to keep his people as busy as possible and I am a bit concerned that may factor into the decision. Any idea how long the pool should be allowed to dry between when it is pumped out and when the liner is dropped? Also, what are some of the possible problems that I should look for during a cold weather liner drop? Are wrinkles the biggest issue? Certainly, it looks like we should not cut out the returns and skimmers until the Spring. Do you agree? Thanks!
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
As long as the floor has ~ no standing water on it, you're good to drop the liner.

YES, the biggest question is going to be wrinkles! They are a LOT harder to 'work out' when the liner is stiff from the cooler temps. Other than that, as long as your PB knows what he's doing, all should be good :thumright:

What we do is to blow out the lines while the pool is empty and linerless and not cut out the returns, etc until the spring. Make sure that they blow out all the lines and add antifreeze, where needed and install the Gizzmo to the skimmer!
 

rockyboy

Well-known member
Jul 13, 2007
175
Waste....no question is a stupid question....right?????

What the heck is a skimmer gizmo? There should not be any water in the lines yet since the plumbing is not even hooked to the equipment on the pad yet. Do you blow out the lines with a regular compressor?
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
A Gizmo is a plastic plug that fits into the pipe at the bottom of the skimmer and sticks up into the skimmer to absorb any expansion from ice forming in the skimmer so that ice pressure doesn't crack apart the entire skimmer. You can see some pictures here.

Even unconnected pipes can get water in them if the ends are not sealed. If they have installed the fixtures then there will be open pipe ends at any skimmer(s), return(s), and drain(s) where water can get in. Water can also get in if there are open pipe ends sticking up at the equipment pad (or anywhere else).

Pipes can generally be blown out with an air compressor or a large shop vac or a special blower designed for that purpose. In rare cases only the special blower will work but mostly you can use any one of the three.