Pool Coping loose - huge estimate for repair

Captsuperfly

Member
May 22, 2016
13
HUntington, NY
Had a concrete/vinyl pool built last year. Had 2" X 12" thermal bluestone slab installed as coping. There is one piece that I can feel tapping on the end when i walk on it so I know it's loose. If you look at the mortar joint underneath, you can see that it's got a hollow spot looks like not enough mortar was used to bed it. (the installers were not great). The rest of it seems solid.

I asked my pool service company (not the original installers) to quote me on removing the loose slab and re-installing it. What I got back was a 5900 estimate to remove ALL of the coping, pour a footing and reinstall. The notes said the coping was installed directly on the "steel wall" of the pool and would all come up. I responded by pointing out that the pool is not steel, but concrete and the coping was installed on an 8" concrete wall. They say 8" is still insufficient to support 12" coping insist it must all come up or it will pop up on its own.

The coping has about 1 1/2 inch or so of overhang poolside. which means it has about 2.5 inch overhang on the back end. Is that really enough to need a footing? Incidentally, three sides of the pool has bluestone patio attached (wet set on poured concrete slab)... so, the bluestone coping on those sides is supported by the slab.

If it comes down to removing all of it, I'll drag the original installer back but can should I really insist they remove the rest of the solid coping to install a footing? It seems far fetched to me. Any help on determining common practice would really help.
 

pooldv

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Aug 10, 2012
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The back half of my gunite pool is raised and the flagstone coping overhangs both sides just like that. I think that yours is fine. It is also normal for there to be a gap in the mortar under the coping and for it to sound a bit hollow in places. They usually put two rows of mortar (front and back) with a gap in the middle and on the edges. One or two of mine tap when you step on it just right. It's done it for several years and no problems yet. Pics in my pool thread, link in sig.
 

domct203

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Jun 3, 2015
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CT
Had a concrete/vinyl pool built last year. Had 2" X 12" thermal bluestone slab installed as coping. There is one piece that I can feel tapping on the end when i walk on it so I know it's loose. If you look at the mortar joint underneath, you can see that it's got a hollow spot looks like not enough mortar was used to bed it. (the installers were not great). The rest of it seems solid.

I asked my pool service company (not the original installers) to quote me on removing the loose slab and re-installing it. What I got back was a 5900 estimate to remove ALL of the coping, pour a footing and reinstall. The notes said the coping was installed directly on the "steel wall" of the pool and would all come up. I responded by pointing out that the pool is not steel, but concrete and the coping was installed on an 8" concrete wall. They say 8" is still insufficient to support 12" coping insist it must all come up or it will pop up on its own.

The coping has about 1 1/2 inch or so of overhang poolside. which means it has about 2.5 inch overhang on the back end. Is that really enough to need a footing? Incidentally, three sides of the pool has bluestone patio attached (wet set on poured concrete slab)... so, the bluestone coping on those sides is supported by the slab.

If it comes down to removing all of it, I'll drag the original installer back but can should I really insist they remove the rest of the solid coping to install a footing? It seems far fetched to me. Any help on determining common practice would really help.
If the coping is mounted directly to the bond beam of the pool, DO NOT also attach it to the patio slab. Those two objects need to move independently.

IMO- If it's not yet broke, why fix it? Can you see movement when you step on it?
 

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