Pool Chemicals

jblizzle

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May 19, 2010
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Tucson, AZ
The short answer is yes.

The better answer is ... enter your test results in the NOW column of PoolMath and then your desired levels in the TARGET column and make sure your pool volume is correct at the top. Then it will tell you what you need to add
 

Donldson

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I'm a bit confused here. If you are talking about the Taylor pH test then red should be about 7.5. Orange would be too low, purple too high.
 

jblizzle

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I'm a bit confused here. If you are talking about the Taylor pH test then red should be about 7.5. Orange would be too low, purple too high.
You see colors differently than me then ;) Orange is 7.5 to me, pink is 8+

Good point about the chlorine though, if your chlorine level is too high, then the pH test will read a false high.
 

Mike Claffy

Active member
Sep 1, 2011
33
My CL is at least 10. Yeah, I realize there is a correction that needs to be made for high CL. The Pool Math Chart doesn't seem to have the capability to take the TC level into account in determining the amount of acid to add for a given level of current PH! Does it do it "behind the scenes"? I.e. in the equations it uses to calculate needed amounts of acid to add?

- - - Updated - - -

Gotcha! Actually, its only deep red now. I don't think I've ever seen purple!!! Lucky me I guess!!!
 

jblizzle

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The chlorine level does not impact the calculation for the amount of acid required to adjust the pH. The high chlorine impacts the ability for the test to work correctly to know what your current pH level is.
 

duraleigh

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You see colors differently than me then :wink: Orange is 7.5 to me, pink is 8+
the colors going from low pH to high pH are

yellow 6.8 and lower
yellow orange 7.0
orange 7.2
orange red 7.4-7.5
red 7.6-7.8
red violet 8.0
violet 8.2 and higher

I am not sure why this isn't referred to more often. I originally got this from waterbear and it is precise. You have to have been here a long time to remember waterbear.
 

Mike Claffy

Active member
Sep 1, 2011
33
The chlorine level does not impact the calculation for the amount of acid required to adjust the pH. The high chlorine impacts the ability for the test to work correctly to know what your current pH level is.
By "impact" I assume you mean: "CL level is not considered in the calculation done in the "Pool Math" Table"?
 

Mike Claffy

Active member
Sep 1, 2011
33
Thanks jb for the response. Can I quibble a bit? You say "not needed". But if "The high chlorine impacts the ability for the ph test to work correctly to know what your current pH level is" (see above). Then the CL level reading will impact/affect the amount of acid to add. if you use the ph test to determine that the pool needs acid, and if a high CL affects the ph reading, then one can't use the ph reading one gets, to determine how much acid to add!

Am I missing something?
 

Donldson

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FC does not affect the pH. FC affects the pH test and causes it to become progressively inaccurate.

It is up to the tester to recognize this situation. PoolMath is a tool, like a calculator. It is designed to assist people in knowing how much chemical to add to change their levels. It is NOT designed, as people incorrectly believe, to replace the pool store "list of things to add to your pool". It doesn't diagnose problems, it doesn't recognize if a person is doing something wrong, it doesn't try to warn you if you are using it to do something unwise, it just calculates.
 

jblizzle

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I am failing to understand your logic.

When the FC is high, you can't test for pH with the Taylor test. Period.
So if you can't test the pH, how can you know what the NOW value is to enter into PoolMath?
Answer: you can't know, therefore there is no way to know if you need to adjust the pH or not.
 

Poolzzz

Well-known member
Aug 14, 2017
373
Vancouver, BC
...if you use the ph test to determine that the pool needs acid, and if a high CL affects the ph reading, then one can't use the ph reading one gets, to determine how much acid to add!

Am I missing something?
You aren't missing anything. That's exactly what he's trying to tell you!!:eek:

Above fc of 10 the pH reading is no good so you can't use it. You must get the fc below ten for the test to work.
 

Richard320

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Jan 6, 2010
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San Dimas, CA (LA County)
Thanks jb for the response. Can I quibble a bit? You say "not needed". But if "The high chlorine impacts the ability for the ph test to work correctly to know what your current pH level is" (see above). Then the CL level reading will impact/affect the amount of acid to add. if you use the ph test to determine that the pool needs acid, and if a high CL affects the ph reading, then one can't use the ph reading one gets, to determine how much acid to add!

Am I missing something?
The pictures explain it best:

https://www.troublefreepool.com/threads/58834-Accurate-pH-test-during-shock-levels-with-R-007
 

sbcpool

Well-known member
Mar 10, 2015
244
Upland, CA
As I remember reading it, high TC "interferes" with the PH test. So, get the FC below 10 before you test PH.
Anybody tried hydrogen peroxide to neutralize the FC before testing during high FC conditions? Even at 20 mg/L FC, one drop of peroxide in 20 mL of water will completely neutralize the chlorine. I don't suspect adding about 0.005 mL of pH 6 solution to 20 mL of pH 7.5 will have much of an effect on the pH.
 

jblizzle

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May 19, 2010
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If Taylor's own chlorine neutralizer (R-0007) does not help, why would you think that hydrogen peroxide would fix their test :D
 

sbcpool

Well-known member
Mar 10, 2015
244
Upland, CA
If Taylor's own chlorine neutralizer (R-0007) does not help, why would you think that hydrogen peroxide would fix their test :D
Because stoichiometry tells us that reacting H2O2 with NaClO yields NaCl + H2O + O2. Since those will not impact the pH test, it cannot be possible that the chlorine is responsible for unreliable pH test and no chlorine still has unreliable pH test. If the test still isn't reliable, it's not the chlorine responsible.
 

jblizzle

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May 19, 2010
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Tucson, AZ
Well I think they hire some fairly smart people at Taylor and I highly doubt that they have all over looks like a simple solution :)

You could do some experiments and provide pictures like in the link above