Plaster Problem Gunite seeping

Aeroknut

Member
Feb 19, 2020
16
Forney, TX
Looking for help guidance from construction/ engineer specialists as it relates to an ongoing water problem. During construction our build was delayed several weeks due to excessive water seeping through the gunite (not up through weep holes, through the gunite) Eventually the builder was more afraid of leaving an empty shell than the seepage problem and decided to move forward w plaster.

immediately one area of the plaster (about 3’x3’) failed on the side of a step area. The plaster guys came out and patched it and it was successful enough for us to fill. Within a few weeks a crack formed along the step and the builder decided to attempt to treat just the crack but it was determined theremay be “something else going on” so the leak guy recommended pulling plaster and doing a patch.

after pulling plaster (see photos) the seepage continues. The pool is almost a year old now and given that the seepage started before initial filling, and continues now we are completely miffed as to what the source of the water is.

questions:
1. The builder recommended chemical soil stabilization, so we did it. He is now suggesting that is the source of the water. Yes they injected app 1,000 gal of stabilization liquid into the soil around the pool but can that really b the source?

2. whether or not that is the source,what can we do related to getting whatever water exists around the shell to stop long enough to get the plaster to set.

3. Is there a better, safer, stronger solution than these small patches?

Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,461
Bedford, TX
nut,

The only way to fix the problem is to create a path for your ground water to go somewhere other than into your pool.. You can't "stop" groundwater, you must redirect it.

In my case, we had to rip up decking on two sides of the pool, and dig two 6 feet deep, 18" wide, 20' long trenches, filled with gravel and with a french drain at the bottom.. The french drains end in a 10' pit with a sump pump in the bottom. The sump pump then pumps the water out of the back yard and into a storm drain..

The pump runs 24/7 and even in the middle of the hottest summers here in Texas, still moves water every day.

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

Aeroknut

Member
Feb 19, 2020
16
Forney, TX
.... ok, thanks. I guess I just can’t imagine where the ground water is coming from. Any thoughts on that? Our lot seems to be the highest around. No large bodies of water, or streams anywhere near.

We have pools on 3 sides around us who did not have similar problems. I think the builder is inclined to believe that the source is the injection and is hoping that will run out, at some point. Does that sound reasonable?

thanks again.
 
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Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,461
Bedford, TX
I think the builder is inclined to believe that the source is the injection and is hoping that will run out, at some point. Does that sound reasonable?
Nut,

Does not make much sense to me at all..

I doubt they injected plain water into your ground.. You would think that it would be obvious to tell if what was in the pool was the same stuff.. Also, it has been a year.. If it were going to go away, I would think that it would be gone by now.

If you live in Forney, I suspect you have a large lot... Go out past your decking and dig a few 4 foot deep post holes and see if they fill with water overnight. Maybe not today as it is raining like crazy here today... :mrgreen:

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

Aeroknut

Member
Feb 19, 2020
16
Forney, TX
Thanks Jim... good idea!

One more question... how much of that drainage work (concrete breakup/ repour, ditches etc...) we’re u expected to cover?
 

cowboycasey

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TFP Guide
Jul 3, 2013
4,433
Fletcher, OK
was there water in the dig before the gunite shell was shot? Did they pump out the water before they shot? If so they should have recommended a sump pit be put in... If they did not see any water before they shot gunite then they found it afterwards coming through the gunite I doubt they will pay for anything... If they knew it was there and went ahead with the expectation it would dry out then you may have a leg to stand on...
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,461
Bedford, TX
Nut,

My situation was a little different, as the plaster company refused to plaster until the weeping problem was fixed.. The pool builder did all kinds of things to "fix" the problem but failed with all of them.. He sprayed a sealer on the gunite, drilled holes in the gunite to "relieve the pressure", ran small tubes from seeping areas to pumps in the bottom of the pool.. etc, etc...

We came to an agreement where he paid most of it and I paid about $2K.. At that point both of us just wanted the pool build to be over...

Putting in the french drains and sump pump almost instantly fixed the weeping.. I think it took a week to go completely dry so that the pool could be plastered.

All this could have been avoided when they dug the hole and it filled with water. It was obvious to me that we had an issue at that point, but they keep saying "no problem, we see this all the time." Over and over again.

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

Aeroknut

Member
Feb 19, 2020
16
Forney, TX
Lots of good stuff here. Essentially, I don’t recall water after the dig. Gunite was poured almost immediately so don’t know if any even had a chance quite frankly. However water did accumulate in the shell quickly, but we also built during an incredibly rainy period (Nov-Mar) the rain stopped the seepage was excessive, rain, seep, rain seep. When we finally had a dry spell long enough the builder signed a waiver to the plaster company so they would plaster because according to him empty shells were bigger problems than plaster issues.

Honestly there have been soo many “little issues” (according to him), that I have had to address we are barely on speaking terms at this point. I guess customers who used to be laborers for general contractors and who know just enough to be dangerous (and annoying 😁) but still not enough to know exactly what’s right, are the worst kind of customers. Sorry if I expect my $100k project ( the most expensive and frivolous thing I’ve done my entire life) to be done correctly the first time.

sorry, bit of vent there.
 

TampaKathy

Gold Supporter
Oct 2, 2020
105
Tampa, FL
I don't have any advice but I've been reading your post...it's things like this that are the reason we can't just stay out of the way...b/c then you'll be taken advantage of. I am still in the planning stages and I think I ask a lot of questions but then I think, "nah, I haven't asked $100k worth of questions yet." haha I hope he figures it out.
 
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