Pentair / Hayward Flow Switch

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,359
The Pentair has a temperature sensor in the stalk. So, it has 4 wires. The Hayward has only the flow switch part and has 2 wires.

You can use the Pentair in a Hayward. You would only use the flow switch wires.

You can use the Hayward in a Pentair, but you won't get temperature. If you don't have a temperature sensor, the unit defaults to 77 degrees. That will make the salinity reading off for any temperature different from 77 degrees.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,177
Central California
The Pentair has a temperature sensor in the stalk. So, it has 4 wires. The Hayward has only the flow switch part and has 2 wires.

You can use the Pentair in a Hayward. You would only use the flow switch wires.

You can use the Hayward in a Pentair, but you won't get temperature. If you don't have a temperature sensor, the unit defaults to 77 degrees. That will make the salinity reading off for any temperature different from 77 degrees.
Can I hijack a little? James - If you "fool" your Pentair SWG in this way, and run it that way in cold water, do you know what the ramifications are? Will it harm the SWG? Will it "spend" any of the plates' lifespan? Or will it just not produce any chlorine? I don't want my IntellipH to stop running this winter, which I think it might once the SWG's temp won't allow chlorine production. I was contemplating disconnecting the temp sensor this winter, to make it think it's still summer ('cause I'm crazy like that). :crazy:
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,359
The efficiency of the process drops off quite a bit at cold temperatures. The chlorine demand is low at low temperatures, so not a big deal to chlorinate manually.

Disconnecting the temperature sensor can make it work because the low temperature cutoff won't work.

As long as the amp reading for the cell can be maintained, the error won't shut down the cell.

In cold water and low salinity, the cell might throw an error because it can't maintain a minimum production amount.

At cold temperatures, the salinity would need to be increased to make it work.

I would suggest that the temperature sensor remains in use and that you chlorinate manually when it shuts off due to the cold.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,177
Central California
I wasn't asking so that I could continue to use the SWG to chlorinate. I'll do that manually. I was asking if I could get away with fooling the IntellipH into working all winter. I just reread a discussion I got into with Matt. He seems to think my acid demand will drop as my chlorine need will, which should simplify maintenance during the winter. I just know last winter I had to dose acid almost every day. The plaster was just installed prior to winter, and we had plenty of sun, so I'm hoping that was the primary cause of the acid demand. It's still pretty thirsty for it, though, even now, a year after install. High TA fill water and SWG, both of which will cease in winter, so there's hope.

I know I shouldn't fool with the built in systems and safeties, especially while both units are under warranty. I just wanted to hear what I wanted to hear, that I don't have to go back to handling MA multiple times a week/month. I really am spoiled now after a summer with the IpH...
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,359
If you keep the pH at 7.8 and the TA at about 60 and the CSI at -0.3 to 0.0, your acid demand should be low.

Brushing the pool at least once a week also helps.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,177
Central California
Wait! I gotta brush, too!?! You're missing the underlying theme here!! ;)

You're right, of course. I'll leave it alone for now, and see how the pool responds to the cold this winter. Thanks!

Pardon me, philo, for the sidetrack...