Opinions on Hayward 950 Tristar VSP

Cybernurse

Gold Supporter
Jun 15, 2015
59
Albuquerque NM
Okay, I know nothing on how to assess my plaster pool built in 1988. We have lived in the house for 14 years. What do I look for? Is there a TFP resource, article or anything to educate myself about this? There are some stains, and in the last 2 years I’ve noticed more and more tiny brown spots all over it, the tile is falling off. No leaks, probably terribly abused by me as far as chemistry goes for the first several years, but trying my best to do the TFP way.
Right now I need to pretty much drain it due to very high CYA ( 250 I believe).
How often does it need resurfacing? What’s the deal about rough versus smooth surface?
I recently installed a water softener in the house, we have hard water. Should I fill it with softened water?
I’m worried about draining it though, I heard it could collapse? How much do I drain?
Any ‘pool Maintenence for dummies “resources anyone can suggest?
I am a high level do it youselfer but not sure I would tackle pool surface.
I am assuming it is plaster.
Any thought or advise would be greatly appreciated!
 

abradleydvm

Bronze Supporter
Jul 28, 2019
52
Denison , tx
I have extra calhypo since transitioning to liquid bleach ....

Can I use it instead of calcium chloride?

Must I wait 24 hours after adjusting ph ?

Do I add my daily amount of chlorine which equals 1.2 oz to increase chlorine 4ppm for a 15,000 gallon pool ?

How many times to repeat or do I add 1 time and retest CH ?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,812
Northern NJ
Your CH is 250 which is fine for a plaster pool. Your CSI is high due to your high TA. Raising your CH will only raise your CSI more. Why do you think you need to raise your CH?
 

Geebot

Well-known member
Aug 19, 2013
895
If it's simply a staining issue then a replaster is not necessary, although I'm questioning whether that's the original plaster after 30 years - pretty unusual. Tiny brown spots could be rust or algae, either of which is easily fixable. You should do a full drain to resolve your CYA and that will get you a better picture of overall condition. If the staining is pervasive then maybe an acid wash will help (50/50 muriatic acid/water - apply to plaster surface with a sprinkler can and then scrub with a brush and rinse quickly). Some people may warn against acid washing because it does remove some plaster, but if you're one acid wash away from catastrophe, better to learn now. For a quality replaster you need to have a pristine surface, some will chip out plaster to gunite, I'm more of a sandblast person, quick and easy. My pool is 45 years old and we did a full replaster 4 years ago. The gunite shell looked like new after the sandblast, which was pretty reassuring.
 

Cybernurse

Gold Supporter
Jun 15, 2015
59
Albuquerque NM
Okay, thank you so much!
I was tinkering, as I am wont to do, took a brass brush and brushed it over some of the brown spots on the steps, and on a black spot on the deep end wall. It didn’t seem to do much to the spots, but the water sure got cloudy white . Is this the plaster flaking off? How to I discern between stains and algae? The spots do not brush off, like algae does. I had tried some Vitamin C last year, did nothing, and put a puck directly on one, did nothing. Were older plaster jobs higher quality than today? My brother in law just re-surfaced and acid washed his pool, it’s probably 5-7 years old.
Somewhere I read a post from a moderator, I believe, he said plaster today is Crud,doesn’t last long at all, that older plaster had aspestos in it, which made it last longer.
I don’t trust the resurfacing guys either, they seem just like the pool store guys. Just want to sell me stuff.
Any thoughts on that.?

Here’s some close up pics. Of the stains/algae
#1 is the steps with all the brown spots
#2 is a dark brown spot that hasn’t changed in 3 seasons
#3 is a black spot that also hasn’t changed in 3 seasons
 

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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,359
Plaster hasn't had asbestos in decades.

Plaster can last 20 years if the chemistry is maintained correctly.

Some of your spots might be gunite showing through where the plaster is thin.

As long as the pool isn't leaking and you're ok with the appearance, there's no need to replaster.

The 3 main types of plaster are cement and an aggregate of marble (calcium carbonate), quartz (sand) or pebble (rocks).

Marble and quartz can be the smoothest. Pebble can be rough like exposed aggregate.

Pebble has different textures. So, do the research and compare to find one that won't be too rough.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,812
Northern NJ
Right now I need to pretty much drain it due to very high CYA ( 250 I believe).
Yes you do as discussed in your other thread.

How often does it need resurfacing? What’s the deal about rough versus smooth surface?
Every pool is different. You resurface when the pool is leaking, rust stains from rbar is showing, or when you get tired of looking at the worn surface.

There are many different options for pool surfaces. It all depends on your personal preference.

I recently installed a water softener in the house, we have hard water. Should I fill it with softened water?
Depends on your water chemistry and balance. You are sharing PoolMath logs but nothing is entered.

I’m worried about draining it though, I heard it could collapse? How much do I drain?
I posted a method to do a water exchange on you other thread.

Any ‘pool Maintenence for dummies “resources anyone can suggest?
Lots in...



I am a high level do it youselfer but not sure I would tackle pool surface.
I am assuming it is plaster.
Plastering a pool is not a DIY job. It takes a crew to get plaster applied in one batch before it hardens.
 
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Cybernurse

Gold Supporter
Jun 15, 2015
59
Albuquerque NM
Yes you do as discussed in your other thread.



Every pool is different. You resurface when the pool is leaking, rust stains from rbar is showing, or when you get tired of looking at the worn surface.
Could these brown spots be rust stains then?

There are many different options for pool surfaces. It all depends on your personal preference.



Depends on your water chemistry and balance. You are sharing PoolMath logs but nothing is entered.
I can’t get anything but CYA and FC, both using dilution.



I posted a method to do a water exchange on you other thread.
Yes thank you, just saw it and replied there too!



Lots in...





Plastering a pool is not a DIY job. It takes a crew to get plaster applied in one batch before it hardens.
-Yes, I wouldn’t want to try it even if it was a DIY job.
Say..off the subject, can I save text preferences anywhere so my reply’s look like yours or do I have to select them each post? Also, how do I cancel a post I started from preview? I looked to see if there is any info on this but could not find anything.
THANK YOU!!!
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,812
Northern NJ
Say..off the subject, can I save text preferences anywhere so my reply’s look like yours or do I have to select them each post?
No settings for it. Just takes some copy and pasting of the quote brackets.

Also, how do I cancel a post I started from preview? I looked to see if there is any info on this but could not find anything.
Where do you want to go? What do you want to do after Preview?


THANK YOU!!!
WELCOME!
 
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sktn77a

Gold Supporter
May 16, 2010
1,370
Chapel Hill, NC
If the staining is pervasive then maybe an acid wash will help (50/50 muriatic acid/water - apply to plaster surface with a sprinkler can and then scrub with a brush and rinse quickly). Some people may warn against acid washing because it does remove some plaster, but if you're one acid wash away from catastrophe, better to learn now.
If you use 50/50 mix of MA and water, it will burn off too much plaster. Pool companies will use 25/75 mix. That's still too high and they know how to brush and rinse. If you do it yourself, I wouldn't go higher than 10/90 - that should still get rid of any hard stains while not removing too much of whatever plaster surface is left at this point.
Any acid wash is going to remove plaster. You just have to consider the cost (dissolving away your plaster surface) versus the benefit (removing stains and getting a more even cosmetic finish).
 
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