new stock tank pool thoughts

kpeavy

New member
Apr 30, 2020
2
Dallas, TC
Hi, new stock tank pool owner here. I set my stock tank pool up differently from almost all the online advice, for various reasons so I'm in a bit uncharted territory here :)

Various things I did differently are listed below...
- I washed the inside with a soapy sponge (and rinsed well) prior to the first fill. I was concerned about residual oils or other chemicals from the galvanization or other manufacturing processes.
- I chose not to paint the inside, as I was leery of how well paint will stick to galvanized steel. I've since gotten feedback from someone who painted the inside with blue "swimming pool paint" a few years ago and no peeling yet. I didn't get details on how they prepped before painting. In the middle of a Texas day, the glare is a bit annoying but really not that bad.
- I did not want to cut holes in steel, this seems like a leak waiting to happen, especially given the ridges in my stock tank. Instead, I built plumbing that goes up and over the edge. I used 2" SCH40 PVC which is a bit oversized but gives a little additional strength against unruly kids. I really don't think it looks that bad. Someday, I'm going to be a tabletop to give shade to the equipment and hide the plumbing a bit.
- Cutting a slit in the 2" pipe with a circular saw made a really cool sheet waterfall. I got excited and installed before I cleaned the inside of the pipe well. I spent a long time scooping bits of PVC from the pool. Do not make this mistake.
- I suspect the movement of the pool will eventually damage my pump. I cut the pipe and put a rubber coupling inline to give it a little wiggle room, hopefully that helps a little. I've seen others attach ridgid plumbing to their vinyl pool and this certainly moves much less than that.
- Inlet is a Intex skimmer, with a skimmer sock. Between that and using a net almost daily, the pool stays very clean.
- I am following the TFP guidelines to a tee, using the app (thanks TPF!) and the TF-100 test kit.
- I've been a little conservative raising CYA slowly as to not overshoot, but it is right about 45ppm now.

The only concern I have is that my chlorine level drops to zero over the course of a single hot (Dallas, Texas) sunny afternoon. I add about 6 fl. oz. of liquid chlorine every evening to get back to 5-6ppm target.
I've convinced myself this is normal given the pool is only 24" deep but curious if others are experiencing the same? Also I wonder if my waterfall and or oversized pump for the size of the pool are impacting this?

Thanks in advance for sharing any thoughts or experience!
 
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splashpad

Bronze Supporter
Aug 2, 2017
2,708
SE Kansas!
- Cutting a slit in the 2" pipe with a circular saw made a really cool sheet waterfall. I got excited and installed before I cleaned the inside of the pipe well. I spent a long time scooping bits of PVC from the pool. Do not make this mistake.
Can you share pics of this please? That is a cool idea!
 

kellyfair

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Jun 29, 2016
2,925
Tampa, FL
You can see the fountain in the profile pic... very cool!

I think you are doing fine with your chemistry. Consider your CYA 50, and your target from 6-8 so you could split the difference and go with 7. A little more after heavy use is fine. Nifty idea!
 

kpeavy

New member
Apr 30, 2020
2
Dallas, TC
Thanks for the advice you all. I'm going to do an overnight chlorine loss test tonight and will report back.

Here's some pictures of the waterfall setup... the cut is not very clean as I did it free hand (no guide) with a circular saw. The pipe "folded in" in the middle so I made a second pass down the middle part. Some day I might redo it on the table saw... but it's good enough for right now - the water pressure pushes it open fairly evenly despite the uneven cut.

Note: Cutting PVC with a circular saw makes a ton of fine PVC bits. Use a dustpan to sweep them up before it blows around your yard, and clean the pipe very well before you connect it into your pool.

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Mdragger88

Bronze Supporter
Jun 1, 2018
1,279
Hernando, Ms
Another note is that it’s quite a small body of water relative to the bather load so that may be the reason for such a large chlorine demand. Kinda like a hot tub. In those u dose as soon as u get out.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,281
Tucson, AZ
I think you could have easily added a wall return bu cutting into the tank. There are plenty of PVC couplings that could make very water tight seals to the metal body and, if need be, some well-place RTV Marine sealant would make short work of any leak. The fountain is a nice feature but the constant aeration is going to drive your pH up.

There are plenty of waterproof paints designed to adhere to galvanized steel. Look them up as the zinc coating won’t last long and, once the steel opens up, corrosion will be an issue.

Finally, as @Mdragger88 mentioned, you should treat this setup like a hot tub as the bather load from two kids is more than enough to use up the chlorine. I’d even go so far as to say you should cover it when not in use. A cover will cut down on evaporation and chlorine loss from the sun.
 
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Mdragger88

Bronze Supporter
Jun 1, 2018
1,279
Hernando, Ms
I saw a blog post the other day where someone used a vinyl liner in one as well - they had an overlap liner with bamboo fencing around the sides that concealed the overhang. She also had one of those fake rocks concealing the pump (she cut out vents) All very interesting & creative!
 
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