New pool, just got tested, how many gallons am I? (Pics)

EarpWJ

Member
May 23, 2019
18
Northern AL
I just bought a house with a pool and brought a sample to the local store for a free test. The water is clear, there is a little yellow/brown "dirt" that comes right off when you brush it with your feet. The pool I think was left alone for the 3 weeks in escrow, then the owner came back and cleaned it up some.

FAC 10
TAC 10
CH 130
CYA 90
TA 120
pH 7.6
Copper 0
Iron 0
TDS 500
Pho 1000

The pool store told me that the chlorine and phosphates are way too high, and that I should consider a copper treatment for the algae. They also said to add Alkalinity Up or Soda Ash.

The owner states that he puts a chlorine tab in each skimmer basket. I do notice that the plastic is brittle in the skimmer boxes, so I am not sure I want to continue doing this. However a float is annoying how it gets stuck. Whats best?

They estimated my pool at 15,000 gallons, but they just used a LxWxD guesstimate. The pool has a deep end where there used to be a diving board. Any idea how many gallons the pool might be (see attached images, units are in inches)

Can anyone tell if the equipment is good? It all appears to be working.
 

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bmoreswim

Mod Squad
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Jul 16, 2012
5,327
Central MD
If the pool is 8' deep, which it should be due to being a diving pool, it is more like 25 to 30K. 15K is not even close.

Do you plan to take control of the pool chemistry yourself? If so, it would be ill-advised to utilize pool store testing and advice. You would want to obtain a proper test kit Test Kits Compared and read up on ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry. You've received some very poor advice already. Adding copper is bad. Phosphates don't matter. But I don't want to make chemistry recomendations until you are ready to hear them or when you post test results from one of the proper kits. It could easily result in trouble as your results from a pool store are likely not fully accurate.
 

CarolineM

Silver Supporter
Jun 20, 2018
220
Annapolis, MD
Whatever you do, do not use anything copper it will stain your pool and turn blonde hair green. If you want water crystal clear without pool store expense and all their potions, you should follow the TFP method. Easier on your wallet, easier on your pool and equipment.

Edit and do not put any chemicals in your skimmer, you can see the damage it has done. Liquid chlorine/bleach is your best option poured in front of a return jet with the pump running.
 

EarpWJ

Member
May 23, 2019
18
Northern AL
If the pool is 8' deep, which it should be due to being a diving pool, it is more like 25 to 30K. 15K is not even close.
Thanks I had a feeling they were probably wildly off. Yeah its about 8' deep.

Do you plan to take control of the pool chemistry yourself? If so, it would be ill-advised to utilize pool store testing and advice. You would want to obtain a proper test kit Test Kits Compared and read up on ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry.
I do plan on doing it myself. I have been reading through the ABCs and other articles.

I do have a question about "How to Chlorinate Your Pool", so whats typically the best buy on liquid chlorine, household bleach or pool chlorine? About how much should I have to add daily?

With the current test results is there anything I should do now?

Is a standard pool brush okay on a vinyl liner pool?
 

gonfishin

Gold Supporter
Jun 13, 2017
281
Rochester, MN
Order a test kit Test Kits Compared

Until you get it, add liquid chlorine (bleach) of about 5 ppm per day.

After you get your test kit, test everything and ask for advice on the forum. The experts will help you get balanced and have a trouble free pool.

Standard nylon bristle pool brush is okay for vinyl pool.
 

bmoreswim

Mod Squad
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Jul 16, 2012
5,327
Central MD
Often times for liquid chlorine/bleach, the best buy is liquid shock (just 12% bleach) especially at a warehouse club. But that's entirely locale based. You just have to check some retailers and do the math to get the cost per oz. based on the % you are looking at. You should have to add roughly 2-5 ppm of FC daily.

Current test results look pretty good except for CYA. It's too high for using liquid chlorine. But so long as you are OK on the FC/CYA chart, then no real worries. But of course I would make no changes until confirmed with proper test kit results.

For vinyl, us a nylon bristle brush.
 

an1vrsy

Bronze Supporter
Jul 10, 2018
137
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
For liquid chlorine comparison to laundry bleach, you must compare percentages. If the pool store you went to sells liquid chlorine, aka liquid shock, it will probably be 12.5%. If it is priced at $5.00 for 128 oz jug then you compare grocery store laundry aisle bleach at 6% for $2.12 for 121 oz. I personally, would buy the liquid chlorine at 12.5%. I end up using half as much for my daily chlorine additions.

All of this is based upon your location and the pricing in your area. Ensure whatever laundry aisle bleach you buy has no additives, no scents and no splashless. Stay away from Chlorox brand as it is not formulated for pools.
 
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Casey

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 16, 2007
10,916
SW PA
If you do not have a SWG ( salt water generator) and your CYA is in fact 90+ I would consider a partial drain to bring it down some. But I'd wait until you get one of the recommended test kits (TF100 with a speed stir) before you do anything. You've got a beautiful pool. Welcome to TFP.