New Filter Recommendations

ontuy

Active member
Mar 26, 2008
28
0
Indiana
#1
Good evening experts.

If anyone has been watching my saga in the Indoor Pool area you will see that I have a small indoor pool. 20x12x4 (approx 7000 gal).

I have finished painting the pool and am in the process of filling it. I have an old Baker Hydro Hydro-Mite cartridge filter that has been giving me fits. It is a model HM-50. First one of the 1/2 rings broke. There were a few left with the house so I was able to get another one on. The problem is the darn thing leaks no matter how much I messed with it. Instead of just buying a new o ring (I assume my problem is that it is old and has been dry for a couple weeks now while I have been working on getting everything painted). I was checking to see if it would leak without thinking and didn't put the rings on and the top flew off as the pressure built up and broke the top and the pressure valve.

Now other than being too stupid to own a pool...I need some advice.

I was contemplating replacing the cartridge filter with a sand filter next year anyway. Now the replacement parts for the old filter I have are in excess of $150. Should I just go ahead and do the sand filter now or replace the parts and stick with the cartridge filter?

My pump and filter are in my basement. My thought is that a sand filter would be more self contained and not be as prone to leaking. Not sure if that is accurate or not. I would like to build the filter off of the ground a little so I could make a drain that would go to my sump pump in the basement just in case. Right now there is no where for the water to go without manually pushing it to the pump (ask me how I know).

I know this is long winded but one more question...I have been looking at sand filters from a few different sources. There are above ground and inground models. Now obviously I have an inground pool but it is so small that I am wondering if an above ground model would suffice. I have been looking at the Hayward S180T as well as the 16". There are a couple filters with pumps ( my 3/4 HP pump is working just fine) that are all listed as above ground. I hate to get the wrong thing but I hate to overpay for more than is necessary for a 7000 gallon pool.

I would really appreciate your advice!
 

JasonLion

LifeTime Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Expert
May 7, 2007
37,879
5
Silver Spring, MD
#2
You want as large a filter as you can afford/fit into your space. Getting a larger filter makes the system a little more efficient, reduces the frequency of backwashing, and will generally be simpler in the long run. The Hayward S180T should be fine, or anything similar, such as a Pentair Sand Dollar SD-35. Both of those go for around $200 on the Internet. But if you can afford to go a little larger I would do it.

Making a drainage pan/pit/channel is a great idea. You probably won't use it much, a new filter should go years without problems, but most likely you will spill some water at some point and then it will have been worth it.
 

ontuy

Active member
Mar 26, 2008
28
0
Indiana
#3
Thanks jasonlion.

Any thoughts on the Clearwater brand? I know Haywards reputation but not sure about some of the others.

I have heard some folks on the board not liking the flexible PVC. Any pro's and cons?

As I mentioned earlier I had started filling the pool before my filter mishap. I have about 2/3 of the pool filled now and it has had no treatment as of yet. Should I throw some Bleach in there? CYA? I am thinking this filter change or fix process will take at least a week and I don't want to be playing catch up with what is now fresh water.

Right now you guys are my best (and only) source of information and I really appreciate it.
 

JasonLion

LifeTime Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Expert
May 7, 2007
37,879
5
Silver Spring, MD
#4
I don't know enough about Clearwater to comment.

Flexible PVC tends to have more problems in the long run than rigid does but it works just fine for many people. Flexible is much easier to work with in tight spaces or when making repairs but you need to be a little more careful gluing the connections. Also a gentle bend in a flexible pipe will have less resistance to flow than a standard rigid elbow so flexible tends to be more energy efficient.

You can't really do much with the water unless you can get some circulation going. If you have a sump pump or cover pump you might be able to rig a temporary situation, but otherwise you just need to wait till the plumbing is done.
 

ontuy

Active member
Mar 26, 2008
28
0
Indiana
#5
Well I went ahead and ordered the Hayward S180T. I am going to be pairing that with the Old Hayward Max Flo 3/4 HP pump. I think I am going to use the Flexible PVC to hook everything up.

Here's to hoping my plumbing skills are adequate.

Wish me luck!
 

JasonLion

LifeTime Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Expert
May 7, 2007
37,879
5
Silver Spring, MD
#7
In a sand filter you need to use sand of exactly the right grain size. Usually you need to go to a pool store to get the right kind of sand.