New Build in New Braunfels, TX. Construction began 9/27/19.

shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
New to this site and our builder will be here Friday 9/27 to start.

Pool Details:
Rectangular 15' x 30'
Tanning Ledge: 6' x 15' with entry steps and three bubblers
15' bench the width of deep end
Depth: 3' x 6' 4' x 6'
Pump: 2 HP VS Jandy Auto Timer
Filter: 460 Cartridge Filter
Automatic Timer
Sanitation: In-line Chlorine with Ozone
No Heater (because Texas)
Suction: Dual Main Drains plus Deluxe Skimmer
Returns: 3
Autofill
Lights: 12V LED (1)
Running electrical to opposite side of house to keep equipment with AC equipment (will eventually fence this off)
Deck: Concrete, extending current patio the length of our house.
Coping: Cantilever

Plaster TBD. Leaning toward Quartzscapes Reflections Series Grenadine Gray.
Tile: Also, TBD, but initial choice was from Mastertile Volcano Series NPT Verona Borba Turquoise
Any input is appreciated! We signed our contract 7/12/19, so we are eager to finally get started.
 

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JJ_Tex

Bronze Supporter
Jul 17, 2019
390
Prosper, TX (DFW)
Awesome and welcome.

What type of cleaner will you have? Also, the ozone is pretty much viewed as a waste of money, so see if you can get rid of that and spend your $ on something else.

I dont know equipment and am too lazy to look it up, but is your pump a variable speed pump, and generally you want the largest filter you can get.

Good luck with your build.
 
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shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
Awesome and welcome.

What type of cleaner will you have? Also, the ozone is pretty much viewed as a waste of money, so see if you can get rid of that and spend your $ on something else.

I dont know equipment and am too lazy to look it up, but is your pump a variable speed pump, and generally you want the largest filter you can get.

Good luck with your build.
Thanks for your input. Yes, the pump is VS and the cartridge size is 460. Firming up cleaner details as well.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
22,404
Laughlin, NV
Welcome to the forum!
I know you are in Texas and pool builders there are allergic to SaltWater Chlorine Generators, but please consider installing one. If not now, be sure they leave enough room to install one when you decide to.

Also would suggest getting a robot cleaner. Do that yourself, not through the pool builder.

I suggest you read ABC's of Pool Water Chemistry.
 

smccann1

New member
Aug 12, 2019
1
Montgomery, Texas
We have a similar pool but with a spa attached to the house side. We initially started with the square sun shelf and steps but changed it after seeing an in progress pool on this site. We added the bench to the long side so the kids could jump off the deep end without obstructions. IMG_0924.jpgIMG_0923.jpg
 

shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
Welcome to the forum!
I know you are in Texas and pool builders there are allergic to SaltWater Chlorine Generators, but please consider installing one. If not now, be sure they leave enough room to install one when you decide to.

Also would suggest getting a robot cleaner. Do that yourself, not through the pool builder.

I suggest you read ABC's of Pool Water Chemistry.
Our builder actually said the same thing about a robot cleaner. You are right about salt water, no builder we talked to would consider it and if they did, they'd void all warranties with the pool. Thanks for the suggestion and the link!
 

shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
We have a similar pool but with a spa attached to the house side. We initially started with the square sun shelf and steps but changed it after seeing an in progress pool on this site. We added the bench to the long side so the kids could jump off the deep end without obstructions. View attachment 119366View attachment 119367
Thanks for sharing your pics!
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
568
MA
You might want to re-think the 3' shallow end. You can not comfortably swim at that depth, There are several posts on here about this you could probably find with a search. 4' is usually the minimum recommended for swimming.

Not sure I would want that step in the deck. I realize there is a grade issue but even with a step there you will still have a drop to contend with on the far side of the pool so a additional 6" might not be too much more to deal with and having one plane from house to pool will be well worth the effort IMHO.
 

Fezick

Member
Aug 25, 2019
8
Clovis California
I would add the sun deck tile pattern to the individual step edges as well. Looks like each step would get two tiles like the top one . It makes each step edge stand out as the steps under water tend to bleed together. We did it in our pool and my wife loves that she does not stub her toes looking for the next step. Looks good!
 

shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
You might want to re-think the 3' shallow end. You can not comfortably swim at that depth, There are several posts on here about this you could probably find with a search. 4' is usually the minimum recommended for swimming.

Not sure I would want that step in the deck. I realize there is a grade issue but even with a step there you will still have a drop to contend with on the far side of the pool so a additional 6" might not be too much more to deal with and having one plane from house to pool will be well worth the effort IMHO.
Thank you for the input!
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,093
NY
We were discussing this in another thread yesterday and it dawned on me afterwards that this is most likely the reason that most ABG pools are 4-4.5ft. They probably found the sweet spot while designing them ages ago and figured if the people couldn’t truely swim they better at least be able to bob around freely.

My 3.5 is too deep to sit and not enough to float in a relaxed seated position or squat. So we either kneel (also gets uncomfortable after a bit) or move to the sweet spot on the slope. There is only a fraction of area in that sweet spot compared to the shallow end so it gets congested with people quickly.
 
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Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,093
NY
Also, a lot of people are (rightfully) concerned about their little kids who can’t stand there yet. They will be able to stand in just a couple years and will be swimming in that pool for the next 40 years. If you stay long enough they will be coming to visit with their own kids one day.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,093
NY
**playing devils advocate on myself**. Don’t loose too much sleep on it either way. My worst time swimming in 3.5 ft is still 1000 times better than any day I had with 0 ft. And if I crack an ice cold beer in 3.5 ft it’s exponentially better than that.
 
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shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
**playing devils advocate on myself**. Don’t loose too much sleep on it either way. My worst time swimming in 3.5 ft is still 1000 times better than any day I had with 0 ft. And if I crack an ice cold beer in 3.5 ft it’s exponentially better than that.
Yes!! Thank you for your input, though. It is very much appreciated and I'm reviewing it all.
 
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shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
You might want to re-think the 3' shallow end. You can not comfortably swim at that depth, There are several posts on here about this you could probably find with a search. 4' is usually the minimum recommended for swimming.

Not sure I would want that step in the deck. I realize there is a grade issue but even with a step there you will still have a drop to contend with on the far side of the pool so a additional 6" might not be too much more to deal with and having one plane from house to pool will be well worth the effort IMHO.
Thank you for your advice. We're changing our shallow end to 4' and adding steps the length of the ledge so we get a full ledge. I'll update pics soon. I had a nagging need to make the change, so thanks for the validation.
 

Oceansol

Well-known member
May 26, 2015
89
Oceanside, California
If you are considering a later spa addition, I would run all the extra plumbing and electrical now—or 6-inch PVC sleeves (like 5 or 6 or possibly more) that can later be used to run plumbing and electrical—from where you think the spa will be to where your pump and filter will be. Just in case and sleeves are cheap. It should save you from later digging up the concrete decking. Just a thought...

One more thing: be sure to be there when they are blowing gunnite. You may want a bigger "this" and a smaller "that" and that is the time to tell the builder.

GOOD LUCK!
 
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BowserB

Silver Supporter
Jul 29, 2018
125
Katy, Texas
Hi Shonda. My wife and I discussed the deep end. I wanted 5' so no matter what, I could stand anywhere in the pool to save a foundering little one without having to swim myself. My wife wanted 6 feet. So we compromised on 6 feet. She has since changed her mind. Too late. Our pool is 39 feet long including the sun shelf, and the shallow end is 3.5 feet, so the slope down to six feet is pretty steep. Another thing we almost agree on now is that the sun shelf for us was a waste. Steps the full width of the shallow end of the pool would be more useful for us. Steps give people of different heights the ability to sit in the pool. We also have an inline chlorinator using 3' tabs. We don't use it. Liquid chlorine added by hand is what I do. At some point I may consider a salt chlorinator, but we'll never use the inline tablet chlorinator--it is a problem for cyanuric acid build up (read the pool school stuff for why.) Heater. If you have natural gas at your house, you might consider it. We've mostly used ours for the spa in winter, but we also used it in October, April, and May for the pool. We're also in Texas, a bit farther south than you in Katy (just west of Houston on I10.) You aren't putting in a spa. We used ours maybe six times over the winter.

Pool cleaner. Our pool builder put in a booster pump for a "pressure side" pool cleaner. Pentair Racer. Problems getting stuck on its side. Replaced with a Pentair Kreepy Krauly, which was a little better until it decided not to bother with the shallow end of the pool. Also, it never picked up very much. Now we're using a Maytronics robotic cleaner. You can research these for yourself at your convenience, since it does not require any pool or pump features--just an electric outlet. A self contained robotic cleaner does not use your pool filter pump or a booster, so the pump doesn't even have to be running. Our Maytronics M-500 has three brushes, cleans the sides including the waterline, and it picks up more grit, grime and other Texas stuff in one 3.5 hour session than the Kreepy Krauly did in a week running three hours every day.

Ozone and UV-C. They do work, but as a supplement to chlorine for bacteria and viruses, not a replacement, and definitely not a replacement for chlorine in preventing algae.

Finally, take advantage of the power savings of your VS pump. Remember at 1/2 speed, it uses 1/8 as much electricity, so you can run it twice as long and still use only 1/4 the juice. Also look into skimmer socks (or less expensive hair nets from Amazon) for your skimmer baskets. They catch a LOT of stuff that otherwise ends up on your main filter, making it less efficient and requiring more frequent cleaning.

During our construction, I was at home, and every day went through the trash pile retrieving equipment manuals and extra parts. I also scavenged leftover stones from the coping job. I broke them up into stepping stones to get from the decking to the equipment pad around the side of the house. I was also here when the many City of Katy inspections took place, so I was able to tell that there were no shortcuts taken by my pool builder--as least as far as the inspectors thought. Apparently the permitting and inspection process in Katy is extensive, expensive, and tedious. In fact, the company that came out to look at an equipment warranty item, is located in the City of Katy, but they don't build pools here. They build in Houston and in Harris, Ft. Bend, and Waller counties outside Katy, but not in the city.

Good luck, and be sure to read the pool school and get the TFP-100 test kit.
 
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shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
If you are considering a later spa addition, I would run all the extra plumbing and electrical now—or 6-inch PVC sleeves (like 5 or 6 or possibly more) that can later be used to run plumbing and electrical—from where you think the spa will be to where your pump and filter will be. Just in case and sleeves are cheap. It should save you from later digging up the concrete decking. Just a thought...

One more thing: be sure to be there when they are blowing gunnite. You may want a bigger "this" and a smaller "that" and that is the time to tell the builder.

GOOD LUCK!
Thanks for the suggestions!
 

shonda_gonzalez

Bronze Supporter
Sep 25, 2019
52
New Braunfels, Texas
Hi Shonda. My wife and I discussed the deep end. I wanted 5' so no matter what, I could stand anywhere in the pool to save a foundering little one without having to swim myself. My wife wanted 6 feet. So we compromised on 6 feet. She has since changed her mind. Too late. Our pool is 39 feet long including the sun shelf, and the shallow end is 3.5 feet, so the slope down to six feet is pretty steep. Another thing we almost agree on now is that the sun shelf for us was a waste. Steps the full width of the shallow end of the pool would be more useful for us. Steps give people of different heights the ability to sit in the pool. We also have an inline chlorinator using 3' tabs. We don't use it. Liquid chlorine added by hand is what I do. At some point I may consider a salt chlorinator, but we'll never use the inline tablet chlorinator--it is a problem for cyanuric acid build up (read the pool school stuff for why.) Heater. If you have natural gas at your house, you might consider it. We've mostly used ours for the spa in winter, but we also used it in October, April, and May for the pool. We're also in Texas, a bit farther south than you in Katy (just west of Houston on I10.) You aren't putting in a spa. We used ours maybe six times over the winter.

Pool cleaner. Our pool builder put in a booster pump for a "pressure side" pool cleaner. Pentair Racer. Problems getting stuck on its side. Replaced with a Pentair Kreepy Krauly, which was a little better until it decided not to bother with the shallow end of the pool. Also, it never picked up very much. Now we're using a Maytronics robotic cleaner. You can research these for yourself at your convenience, since it does not require any pool or pump features--just an electric outlet. A self contained robotic cleaner does not use your pool filter pump or a booster, so the pump doesn't even have to be running. Our Maytronics M-500 has three brushes, cleans the sides including the waterline, and it picks up more grit, grime and other Texas stuff in one 3.5 hour session than the Kreepy Krauly did in a week running three hours every day.

Ozone and UV-C. They do work, but as a supplement to chlorine for bacteria and viruses, not a replacement, and definitely not a replacement for chlorine in preventing algae.

Finally, take advantage of the power savings of your VS pump. Remember at 1/2 speed, it uses 1/8 as much electricity, so you can run it twice as long and still use only 1/4 the juice. Also look into skimmer socks (or less expensive hair nets from Amazon) for your skimmer baskets. They catch a LOT of stuff that otherwise ends up on your main filter, making it less efficient and requiring more frequent cleaning.

During our construction, I was at home, and every day went through the trash pile retrieving equipment manuals and extra parts. I also scavenged leftover stones from the coping job. I broke them up into stepping stones to get from the decking to the equipment pad around the side of the house. I was also here when the many City of Katy inspections took place, so I was able to tell that there were no shortcuts taken by my pool builder--as least as far as the inspectors thought. Apparently the permitting and inspection process in Katy is extensive, expensive, and tedious. In fact, the company that came out to look at an equipment warranty item, is located in the City of Katy, but they don't build pools here. They build in Houston and in Harris, Ft. Bend, and Waller counties outside Katy, but not in the city.

Good luck, and be sure to read the pool school and get the TFP-100 test kit.
Great tips, thanks!