need help with algie and tiny worm like creatures

poolguy

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Mar 31, 2008
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#1
I just purchased a home with an above ground pool. The pool is 18' X 30' oval with a sand filter, 1.5hp pump and automatic chlorinator and vinal liner. when I purchased the property the sellers told me the problems with the pool. Last spring they purchased the pool so it is fairly new but the company they got it from got it started for them. They followed the process of taking care of the pool through the summer but when the mid fall they ment to close the pool but never did. They did not have it covered and didnt add any chemicals. The first time I saw the pool was in Dec. and the water was clear but a lot of stuff on the bottem, mostely leaves, covered in leaves. In jan. I got the net and got most of the leaves out. As the weather got warmer the pool began to get foggy green and eventally completely green. Kinda a neon green color. I have never owned a pool but had all these chemicals left over from the previous family so I just read the instructions and tried to kinda figure out what to do. First I got the pump and filter going. Then I assumed the green was algie. So I took the algicide, it said 24-36oz's so I put round 33 oz's. in and waited a few hours. Then I Put two bags of shock in and left. Over night The pool realy cleared up and is almost completely clear. But, I ran the net through the water and when it came out there were a couple of tiny wiggly worm like things probably less then 1/4 inch long with a redish color. So I thought maybe there just a few of them so I tried both ends and both sides and was getting them out everywhere. Does anyone know what these are, are they dangerous, and how do I get rid of them. Also shoud I have done somthing differently with the chemicals or do I need to do more. How can I get this pool ready to swim in.
 

JasonLion

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May 7, 2007
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#2
Welcome to TFP!

You need to get all of the organic debris you possibly can out of the pool. Fish it out with the skimmer net, vacuum the bottom, do whatever it takes. It doesn't really matter if some of it is alive. From the point of view of the chemistry the worms are the same as leaves just less nice to look at.

While you are working on that you can do some basic balancing of the water. That means getting a good test kit, so you know what your current levels are. I recommend the TF Test Kit, see the link in my signature. There is no better investment in your pool than a good test kit. Post a full set of test numbers and we can give you more specific advice.

Once the water is basically balanced you want to shock the pool, which means holding a high FC level (based on your CYA level) for a couple of days to make sure everything alive in the pool is killed off.

Then you can switch to routine pool care.

While you are about all of that read up from The Stickies section of this site, see the link in the sub-heading of each page or in my signature.
 

SeanB

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#3

waste

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Mar 29, 2007
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#5
I've seen those critters hundreds of times, no clue what they are (Grace could well be right about them being mosquito larvae). They aren't vicious (I've never had one attack me :wink: ) and the chlorine does kill them and they filter out a lot nicer than algae.

On thing I do want to mention is that unless the bags of shock you are using says 'fast dissolving' you should premix it in a bucket before pouring it in front of an active return -- any of the chlorine that doesn't dissolve before settling on the liner will discolor and weaken the liner where it sits. :(

Welcome to TFP and please follow the advice already given! :-D
 
G

Guest

#6
Sound like mosquito larva to me. Chlorine will take care of them (as well as tadpoles, which I have seen in many pools here in FL that are neglected). BTW, if you shock does say 'fast dissolving' it is most likely dichlor and will add CYA to your water (which might or might not be a good thing!) Getting a water test would be helpful. Getting a GOOD testkit and testing it yourself would be even better!
 

Hotrod30

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Dec 22, 2007
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#7
waste said:
On thing I do want to mention is that unless the bags of shock you are using says 'fast dissolving' you should premix it in a bucket before pouring it in front of an active return -- any of the chlorine that doesn't dissolve before settling on the liner will discolor and weaken the liner where it sits. :(

What waste said is true. I would go one step farther and mix any powder shock in a pail of water first; quick dissolving or not.