Need guidance on solar panels

aislephive

New member
Oct 26, 2020
1
Florida
So I live in SW Florida with a south-facing roof that gets prime sun exposure for most of the day. For that reason I'm strongly considering solar panels on my roof to heat the pool and extend my swimming season to as close to year round as possible. I've gotten a few quotes from different companies and they all have their marketing pitches on why their style is the best but as a layman I have no idea what to believe. I have seen nothing in terms of independent research on which kinds are best or the extent to which those differences actually matter. I am fairly close to the coast so things like wind resistance are nice, but of course I want something with good heating efficiency as well and also a good warranty.

The three different companies I dealt with all have different panels. The cheapest option are Vortex panels which seem pretty basic. The other 2 use Heliocol and Aquatherm Eco Sun panels which seem pretty similar to each other and also cost about the same. I believe the Aquatherm panels are a little more energy efficient but requires more punctures to the roof for installation. The Heliocol panels are also more wind resistant I believe. So far the only major solar panel type I haven't gotten an estimate for is Fafco which I know is also highly reputable. If anybody has experience with any of these or can give me some insight I would greatly appreciate it as it's a decent investment and I want to make sure that I make the right decision. Thanks!
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,608
Tucson
I have had a Heliocol system for about 12 years. Other than a couple minor leaks, that were solved by replacing some O-rings, I have had no issues with it.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
+1 for Heliocol. Quality, best coupling technology I could find. Wind and expansion is all handled by the excellent design. I checked out Aquatherm EcoSun's website, but couldn't ascertain much. It's a pretty lame site: missing images, no user/installation manual, no closeup pictures of the panels, etc. I was trying to see how their panels connect. If it's the "radiator hose and hose clamp" method, steer clear. Heliocol uses an o-ring that is encased and out of the sun. Their mounting system is great. I installed myself and saved 70%! I think the warranty is 20 years.

If you decide to use your south-facing roof area, be certain you'll never want to install PV solar. I used the north-facing side for my pool heater, and saved the better south-facing side for my PV solar. Pool solar is more forgiving that PV when it comes to sun angle.

I also used black UV PVC, which was superior to white or white painted black. The black faded a bit, but it's still way better looking than white, and way, way, better looking than peeling paint (painted pipe won't last long on a roof). So be sure to ask your installer what they use for pipe.
 

matthewsunshineflorida

Well-known member
Sep 28, 2018
104
Tampa, FL
Pool Size
12500
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
+1 for Heliocol. Quality, best coupling technology I could find. Wind and expansion is all handled by the excellent design. I checked out Aquatherm EcoSun's website, but couldn't ascertain much. It's a pretty lame site: missing images, no user/installation manual, no closeup pictures of the panels, etc. I was trying to see how their panels connect. If it's the "radiator hose and hose clamp" method, steer clear. Heliocol uses an o-ring that is encased and out of the sun. Their mounting system is great. I installed myself and saved 70%! I think the warranty is 20 years.
Where did you buy them? So you have 384sqft for a pool that's probably close in gallons to mine, what temps are you able to maintain vs outside temperature?

I'm really surprised at how expensive I'm seeing them from re-sellers even without labor (which I'm sure I can handle myself). $750/ea panel? I'm west facing with a screen so I feel like I'd need more panels than I otherwise would. I'd really like to extend the swim season for longer and not have to use the gas heater unnecessarily - but it's hard to figure out what my break even point is for something so expensive. If I'm going to spend nearly $10,000 on solar panels, is that really worth it to save $1k/yr vs gas with penetrations in the roof - or am I not thinking of this correctly? You have a gas heater too so I'm curious to hear your thoughts...
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,608
Tucson
I have a Heliocol system. Based on the recommendations of the local Heliocol rep, it is 80% of the surface area of my pool. There are 11 panels, for my 20k gallon pool. It has been about 10 years since they installed the system, but my cost (at that time)for the full system, including installation was aprox $5,000. The panels are the primary cost. A Pentair SolarTouch control system can be had for about $300. That gives you the temp sensors, valve, valve actuator and digital controller. All you need add is plumbing, panels and installation.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Where did you buy them?
From a local solar installer. They sold a solar kit, which included the panels along with virtually everything you need to DIY install. It was amazing. Down to some rags to wipe up glue. They even delivered and helped me get them up on the roof! The kit was around $2500 for 8 big Heliocol panels. Unheard of price. Still don't know why. Then about another $500 for plumbing and actuator stuff, so about $3K total + my labor. I really lucked out, and tried to send other TFPers to them for the same deal. But the co I bought them from no longer offers this deal (I checked recently). :(
what temps are you able to maintain vs outside temperature?
It's tough to say for sure, because there are so many variables and no way to create a good comparison test. I don't cover my pool, so my daily water temps are based on that day's sun exposure, the ambient air temp AND the temps of the night before. With no control for comparison, I can never be sure what the pool would have been without the solar. Kind of a catch 22. That said, my best guess is my system adds between 5-10° each day. If I bothered to cover my pool at night, I'm sure my results would be vastly better, but I've never tried. Nor have a ever turned on my gas heater (installed by the previous owners), so I can't help you with any comparisons there, either. My pool is usually about 10° warmer than the neighbor's, so that's about as scientific as I can get.
$750/ea panel?
Yep, I was seeing upwards of $1K each when I was shopping. When I stumbled on my local deal I didn't hesitate.
I'm west facing with a screen so I feel like I'd need more panels than I otherwise would.
As I said, my panels face North, so I could use South for PV. My solar guy said it would make little difference, if any, because solar heaters are not subject to the same angle restrictions of PV solar. When I most need solar, in the swim season, the sun seems to be either directly overhead, or even slight on the north side, so I'm convinced he was right. In summer, my North side gets sun all day long. My house only has N and S facing areas, no W or E. The ridge runs virtual E to W.
Now West is a different issue, because you'll be missing that morning sun, which is instrumental in warming up the pool sooner in the day. You could always split the array, half West and the other half East. I've seen PV installations like that, when they don't have enough South-facing roof.
I'd really like to extend the swim season for longer and not have to use the gas heater unnecessarily
This was a disappointment. I'm getting the pool plenty warm in summer. I generally run the solar most of the day, but rarely want the pool any warmer than it gets. 85-90° is great for me. My thermostat is set for 85°, but a hot day can push it up to 90° or more, even after the solar kicks off. I'll swim in 80°, too. But the "promise" of extending the swim season a month on each end is a little thin. I don't get that, more like 2 weeks on each end, so an extra month total. Which is still nothing to sneeze at. In general, I feel my pool is about 5-10° warmer than it would be otherwise, and that can be the difference between getting in comfortably, or whining about it! Sometimes I'll swim in 75° or even 70°, if I'm overheated enough, so even in that season that's better than 65°! I don't have to consider the cost of running the pump for extended periods of the day to satisfy the solar system, because my PV system "pays" for it, not me.
If I'm going to spend nearly $10,000 on solar panels, is that really worth it to save $1k/yr vs gas
Though I've never tried, I think warming my pool would be more like $300-400 a month, x 6 months = $1800. To be fair, that guesstimate doesn't really matter, because I would never spend it. I get what I get from my solar and that has to do. $1000-2000/yr to warm up the pool is not in my budget. $3000 for 20+ years of an extra 10° was a no brainer for me and my budget. I don't enjoy swimming when it's cold, or even cool out, so heating a pool in early spring or late fall is also not in the cards for me. So, again, the solar heater is the right choice for my use case.
with penetrations in the roof
The Heliocol brackets do screw in, but they do not penetrate the felt or underlayment. I have a concrete tile roof, and the brackets are only screwed into the tiles, no deeper. I got that from the solar company that sold me the panels, and so far so good. So the array will not cause any roof leaks. The screws are sealed to the tile, but even if a seal fails the water will just drip onto the felt and run down to the gutter. An asphalt shingle roof would be a different story. We get decent wind here, too, but no issues there, either. I attribute that to the Heliocol design. They require no special tie-down straps like other systems do, and they're engineered for a healthy wind load (I forget the figures).

I hope I covered everything... (and then some?) ;)
 
Last edited:

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,596
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
I wonder what the difference would be in getting solar power panels instead and using the power output to offset a heat pump? I gotta think you'd generate enough power to totally cover the heat pump plus.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
I wonder what the difference would be in getting solar power panels instead and using the power output to offset a heat pump? I gotta think you'd generate enough power to totally cover the heat pump plus.
That was suggested to me by my PV solar installer. IF the solar heater panels and associated plumbing lasts the warranted 20 years, or longer, that pretty much makes the installation cost the total fixed cost. I don't count the energy costs of the pumping needed for solar heating, because that's $0 (provided by PV solar). So the heater is $3K deferred over 20 years. What's a heat pump? $4K, $5K? Plus installation (something I couldn't do myself). And how many heat pumps will you buy over 20 years? One? Two? Surely they need maintenance. So that's an unknown cost. Solar panel repair (as long as I can climb on the roof) is DIY. Or simple enough a handyman can do it (once I can no longer get up there). If a panel fails, it's covered. So that $3K is still pretty much the fixed cost. And then to the heat pump upfront cost you have to add the additional PV panels to run it. Two or three, I think they said. Not sure that cost. At least $1K, I'd guess. Maybe more?

So for me the math didn't add up for a heat pump, compounded by the problem of it not working all that great in my climate, which you have to consider. They work based on available climate conditions, and don't work at all in some locations. They're not like a gas heater that can work all the time, any time...

Solar panels can only heat from mid morning-ish to early evening-ish. I don't know what the hours of operation are for a heat pump. Gas, or course is 24/365.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,596
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
That was suggested to me by my PV solar installer. IF the solar heater panels and associated plumbing lasts the warranted 20 years, or longer, that pretty much makes the installation cost the total fixed cost. I don't count the energy costs of the pumping needed for solar heating, because that's $0 (provided by PV solar). So the heater is $3K deferred over 20 years. What's a heat pump? $4K, $5K? Plus installation (something I couldn't do myself). And how many heat pumps will you buy over 20 years? One? Two? Surely they need maintenance. So that's an unknown cost. Solar panel repair (as long as I can climb on the roof) is DIY. Or simple enough a handyman can do it (once I can no longer get up there). If a panel fails, it's covered. So that $3K is still pretty much the fixed cost. And then to the heat pump upfront cost you have to add the additional PV panels to run it. Two or three, I think they said. Not sure that cost. At least $1K, I'd guess. Maybe more?

So for me the math didn't add up for a heat pump, compounded by the problem of it not working all that great in my climate, which you have to consider. They work based on available climate conditions, and don't work at all in some locations. They're not like a gas heater that can work all the time, any time...

Solar panels can only heat from mid morning-ish to early evening-ish. I don't know what the hours of operation are for a heat pump. Gas, or course is 24/365.

Someone must have done an ROI for this it would be interesting to see. Heat pumps last I think around 15 years or so and do not require any maintenance during that time (despite what your HVAC tech may tell you. They are a closed system and have no maintenance needs other than maybe cleaning leaves off the coils if needed). They also provide way more heat than solar heating would provide so there's that. I think neither would be effective in colder months. And dry climates are not suited to Heat pumps.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dirk

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Someone must have done an ROI for this it would be interesting to see. Heat pumps last I think around 15 years or so and do not require any maintenance during that time (despite what your HVAC tech may tell you. They are a closed system and have no maintenance needs other than maybe cleaning leaves off the coils if needed). They also provide way more heat than solar heating would provide so there's that. I think neither would be effective in colder months. And dry climates are not suited to Heat pumps.
Excellent info, thx. How about hours of operation? Can they heat all day and night, given the other climate conditions are good?
 

Enjoying this content?

Support TFP with a donation.

Give Support

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,596
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
Excellent info, thx. How about hours of operation? Can they heat all day and night, given the other climate conditions are good?

They heat 24x7. They are only dependent on temperature and humidity. In my region they will keep a pool at 92 all summer long. They lose efficiency quickly in colder weather, however. Below mid 50's or so they don't do much.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dirk

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
They heat 24x7. They are only dependent on temperature and humidity. In my region they will keep a pool at 92 all summer long. They lose efficiency quickly in colder weather, however. Below mid 50's or so they don't do much.
24/92, solar can't claim those numbers...
 

matthewsunshineflorida

Well-known member
Sep 28, 2018
104
Tampa, FL
Pool Size
12500
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Great discussion, so much to read up on here. On an initial first look, I'm reading that PV solar panels are only about 15-30% efficient at transferring the radiation into electricity, then a heat pump might be 80% efficient at turning that into heat - whereas supposedly pool solar is up to 80% efficient at transferring the already radiated heat into the water.

So I'm thinking that pool solar is technically more efficient, however, that doesn't consider the timing - when you net meter, you can generate a whole lot of electricity during the day and use it at night whereas the pool solar is only heating during the time it's making energy. It also allows you to reduce your electric bill during the summer months where you might not want much solar heating. I'll have to do some more research on the ROI of this but first I need to find out how to get a realistic solar price because what I'm seeing is ridiculous.

@Dirk I have absolutely no clue how you found an entire system for $3k. I literally can't find those panels under $750/ea and in kits they're even more expensive - I'm not seeing a similar setup for less than $6k-$7k without installation! I wonder if it's a supply/demand issue just like pools have gone way up in price this year (a friend signed with the same company as me two months later and all their prices are up significantly in that short time).

Pool should be done Feb/March and we're gonna make my wife's end of April birthday a pool party as a fun way to open it up so I'll at least heat it that day and pay the piper - but I would prefer to be able to have 80s temps in April/May and not have to wait until June to really use the pool.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
@Dirk I have absolutely no clue how you found an entire system for $3k.
Frankly, neither do I. I can only guess that there must be a fantastic markup on solar panels, and this particular vendor didn't exploit that.
I literally can't find those panels under $750/ea and in kits they're even more expensive - I'm not seeing a similar setup for less than $6k-$7k without installation! I wonder if it's a supply/demand issue just like pools have gone way up in price this year (a friend signed with the same company as me two months later and all their prices are up significantly in that short time).
Supply and demand must come into play, but back before I snagged that price, I did some comparison shopping because at the time I didn't know how good a deal it was. I don't recall seeing any prices any lower than what you're finding, and some vendors were selling the same panels for $1K.

There are much cheaper panels. Despite some claims, I suspect the actual amount of heat produced is similar. It's black tubes on a roof. How much more efficient could one type of black tubes be from another set of black tubes!?! Heliocol's excel in other ways: mounting mechanism, wind resistance, the way they handle expansion and contraction, the way the panels connect to each other and warranty. Does that make them worth twice the price?

The company that sold me the kit for $2500 also quoted an installed price of $10K. So at least that company's business model was based on the profit from labor charges, not material charges. My best guess is that they put that particular kit price together based on the numbers they used to calculate their installed quotes, and somehow overlooked the profit available by just selling panels. In other words, they were in the business of selling installation, not materials, and this kit price just kinda snuck through the cracks. As I mentioned, they found that crack and no longer offer that price, so it was short-lived...
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Heat pumps last I think around 15 years or so and do not require any maintenance during that time
If that's true, and they can be run "for free" just by adding PV panels, then the up-front cost of both is certainly something to consider, especially if your climate supports a heat pump. I looked into them, and something turned me off. It was either the cost, or the longevity, or their efficiency where I live. Or a combination of those. It just didn't make good sense. But if I could heat my pool 24/7 and get it up to 92, without impacting my electric bill, and have a maintenance free solution for 15 years, AND it didn't cost any more (maybe even less) than a solar installation, that would be the way to go. I have a vague recollection that when I did my scant research into a heat pump I heard more like a 5-year lifespan. And something like a $5K+ unit cost. That would have meant $20K+ over 20 years. Solar at $3K over 20 years was something I couldn't ignore, even though I knew I'd be giving up some degrees of heat.

Point being, get some good corroborating data about a heat pump's longevity and maintenance costs to confirm what PoolGate has shared. Because the difference between his recollections and mine would really impact the math. And of course report back with what you come up with, please.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,596
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
If that's true, and they can be run "for free" just by adding PV panels, then the up-front cost of both is certainly something to consider, especially if your climate supports a heat pump. I looked into them, and something turned me off. It was either the cost, or the longevity, or their efficiency where I live. Or a combination of those. It just didn't make good sense. But if I could heat my pool 24/7 and get it up to 92, without impacting my electric bill, and have a maintenance free solution for 15 years, AND it didn't cost any more (maybe even less) than a solar installation, that would be the way to go. I have a vague recollection that when I did my scant research into a heat pump I heard more like a 5-year lifespan. And something like a $5K+ unit cost. That would have meant $20K+ over 20 years. Solar at $3K over 20 years was something I couldn't ignore, even though I knew I'd be giving up some degrees of heat.

Point being, get some good corroborating data about a heat pump's longevity and maintenance costs to confirm what PoolGate has shared. Because the difference between his recollections and mine would really impact the math. And of course report back with what you come up with, please.

I think officially they last "10 to 20" years. 5 years is the lifespan of gas heat. Which is inline with the couple people I know that have them. My one neighbor has had the same heat pump for going on 18 years. I also don't know the costs for adding a couple solar electric panels strictly to provide the heat pump with power. It would only make sense if one installs that system as the owner option and not a metered service option. What prompted me to suggest electric solar panels and a heat pump was the price I have seen quoted for solar pool heat at $10k-$30k. Even if the heat pump was a little more, the benefits of a heat pump over solar heat really are night and day.

And if you are a DIY'er, heat pumps are not hard at all to install and you can get one for $2k-$3k. I have actually myself been thinking of adding a heat pump to my pool. Gas is SOOOOOOO expensive. I know I can put in the heat pump soup to nuts as well.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
I think officially they last "10 to 20" years. 5 years is the lifespan of gas heat. Which is inline with the couple people I know that have them. My one neighbor has had the same heat pump for going on 18 years. I also don't know the costs for adding a couple solar electric panels strictly to provide the heat pump with power. It would only make sense if one installs that system as the owner option and not a metered service option. What prompted me to suggest electric solar panels and a heat pump was the price I have seen quoted for solar pool heat at $10k-$30k. Even if the heat pump was a little more, the benefits of a heat pump over solar heat really are night and day.

And if you are a DIY'er, heat pumps are not hard at all to install and you can get one for $2k-$3k. I have actually myself been thinking of adding a heat pump to my pool. Gas is SOOOOOOO expensive. I know I can put in the heat pump soup to nuts as well.
Ding it! Now you've got me all hot for a heat pump!! Maybe it's a coastal thing (the costs)?

Sorry I wasn't clear. I didn't mean to suggest installing a dedicated PV system just to offset the cost of running a heat pump (though I suppose that's possible). I meant adding enough panels to an existing whole-house PV system to offset the additional load of a heat pump. I might have gotten ahead of myself there.

So 5 years on gas?! Yikes. I've never turned mine on, but I've been here for six and the pool's older than that, so my gas heater must be 8-9 years old. Now I wonder if I should replace it with a heat pump?!? My automation system can decide which is the more efficient heating system (gas or solar) to turn on at any given point during the day/night. I wonder if it could manage a heat pump and a solar system.

Sorry for the hijack. This thread has got me thinking. While the solar is all I need for the summer, it definitely falls a bit short in the fringe months (early spring and late fall). We had a good long season this year, but year before that my swim season was only about four months long! I'll have to look into the possibilities of running both. Maybe the OP should too, especially if they don't have a PV system.

What movie did I get this from: "Remember, it only costs 100% more to go first class!" ;) Why worry about which heat system to buy, buy 'em both!!
 
Last edited:

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,596
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
Ding it! Now you've got me all hot for a heat pump!! Maybe it's a coastal thing (the costs)?

Sorry I wasn't clear. I didn't mean to suggest installing a dedicated PV system just to offset the cost of running a heat pump (though I suppose that's possible). I meant adding enough panels to an existing whole-house PV system to offset the additional load of a heat pump. I might have gotten ahead of myself there.

So 5 years on gas?! Yikes. I've never turned mine on, but I've been here for six and the pool's older than that, so my gas heater must be 8-9 years old. Now I wonder if I should replace it with a heat pump?!? My automation system can decide which is the more efficient heating system (gas or solar) to turn on at any given point during the day/night. I wonder if it could manage a heat pump and a solar system.

Sorry for the hijack. This thread has got me thinking. While the solar is all I need for the summer, it definitely falls a bit short in the fringe months (early spring and late fall). We had a good long season this year, but year before that my swim season was only about four months long! I'll have to look into the possibilities of running both. Maybe the OP should too, especially if they don't have a PV system.

What movie did I get this from: "Remember, it only costs 100% more to go first class!" ;) Why worry about which heat system to buy, buy 'em both!!

Just keep in mind heat pumps lose efficiency really fast in colder weather. Where I am they do not really help to extend the season much at all. If I got one, it would be to maintain my toasty 92 in season for less money. I would still use gas for shoulder months. Which in reality, we don't really do anyway. And I probably would still use gas to get nice, hot water coming out of my water features and returns, which we would never give up. Also keep in mind they typically need a dedicated 50 amp circuit. For me, that means I will be running another line if I add one.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
8,624
Central California
Pool Size
12300
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Well, I wasn't thinking about 50° weather. I don't like to swim when it's cool out. But I have plenty of warm days, nice enough to swim, where the pool never gets quite warm enough. It's because I don't cover it and it cools off where I live at night. I regularly have 10-15° swings from night to day, in the fringe seasons. But I hear ya. I'll have to see what local companies say, those that have specific experience with my climate... Thx!
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,608
Tucson
The lifespan of gas heater or heat pump is greatly determined by maintenance of your water chemistry. My neighbor‘s gas heater failed at 6 years Mine, (which is identical and was installed at the exact same time), is at 15 years and going strong. So far, I have replaced one sensor and one igniter.
 

Enjoying this content?

Support TFP with a donation.

Give Support