My Stenner install complete!

Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
While this is pretty straightforward, I thought I would share my install just in case it sparks any ideas for someone else. All in all, it was pretty simple and easy to get done.

First the bits:

stenner.JPG

One Stenner Econ T pump with timer. I also purchased the mounting bracket, which makes sense with my install as you'll read in a bit.

One $17 Ammo box from Amazon:

ammo open.JPG

One 1.5" slip fitting with a 1/2" NPT threaded female port:

fitting.JPG

One very heavy 13 gallon barrel:

tank.JPG

I bought this on FB market place for $8. I just couldn't make myself pay $200 for a Stenner tank when these are so readily and cheaply available. I used an 18" paver for the pedestal. The barrel has a nice, large screw-top lid, which makes pouring in the bleach very easy and prevent spilling, I wanted to drill the vent port as high as possible to allow for the most volume, so I drilled it just below the lid. I was a little worried about the angle of the barrel in that location. So, I grabbed a 58 cent plastic elbow at Lowe's to redirect the opening and prevent rain from getting in the barrel.

vent.JPG

In deciding where to place the injection port, I felt that injecting after the filter and directly into the return would be the least invasive and safest for my equipment in the event of an error. Fortunately, my "package" from the pool installer included this beautiful $300 combination inaccurate thermometer and paperweight, so it was my target of interest in deciding the location. It was installed with buttress fittings, so I was able to remove it without cutting any of the plumbing. I do admit that the uselessness of this thing was most of what drew me to this site. So, I have that to thank it for.

ionizer.JPG

Using a couple of short lengths of pipe, two 1.5" slip-to-buttress fittings and the T fitting above, I fashioned a system that matched the length and fitting style of the ionizer and it's associated transition fittings. I almost decided not to post this pic because my PVC gluing job was embarrassingly messy. So much so, that I may get more fittings and make another one. I just have to decide if it's worth $15 dollars to not see the blue slop all over it every time I look at it. But, it doesn't leak, so I guess that's not too awful for a first timer.

inject fitting.JPG

The purpose of the ammo box is to serve as a protective housing for the pump and its power supply. The mounting bracket allows the pump to be very easily removed for reprogramming. It's two-part design has a plate that mounts to the mounting surface and a second one that mounts to the pump. One plate is slotted and the other features a tenon. So, you simply slide the pump up and out of the slot to pull it free from its mounted position.

I also mounted a short outdoor grade extension in the box. This was necessary to accommodate the wall wart style power supply for the Stenner. If I have any criticism of this pump, it is the power supply. It makes protecting the power supply in outdoor conditions more difficult. Although, it is probably the right design. The pump runs on low voltage DC, so including the transformer in the pump housing would just make it bulkier and heavier, along with it being less serviceable should that power supply fail.

I notched the bottom edge of the box with a rotary tool to accommodate the power chord, and drilled two holes for the lines, making them over-sized enough that they will easily slide up and down when pulling the pump to reprogram or service. I considered (and still am) simply cutting a square opening in the bottom of the box roughly the width of the pump exits just in case the pump were to leak, hoping it would prevent it from accumulating on the bottom of the box. The down side it that it makes it easier for creepy crawlies and other critters to get in and take up residence. The jury is still out on that one.

mounted open.JPG

So, it shuts up nicely with everything safe and sound:

mounted closed.JPG

It's not the most glamorous setup for sure, but I think it is going to work well for us:

full rig.JPG

The system is setup to inject during a time which the pump is running. The pump features a built-in timer, which has proven to be remarkably reliable. (until it isn't) Further, the Stenner is powered from the same GFCI outlet that powers the pump. (it only draws .75 amps) So, if the GFCI or breaker trips, both are disabled, as the battery backup in the Stenner only preserves the time and injection programming. It will not power the pump. That said, there are obviously scenarios where the Stenner could inject anyway even if the pump failed or the main pump timer start and end time was inadvertently changed. This could happen, as the pump timer is pretty rudimentary in design.

So, I have debated what sort of additional precautions I should take to prevent damage to the equipment should I get injection when the pump isn't running. I know that all of the electronics wizards could generate many elaborate designs, but I just don't think that works for me right now. Plus, if I was regularly interrupting power to the Stenner, I would be changing batteries in it all the time. I also considered installing a check valve in that new part I fashioned so that if chlorine is injected in a standing system, at least it would only flow down and stand in the return line plumbing and not back to the filter.

I ultimately decided that even if chlorine flows into the filter, there would be enough dilution with the water in the system that it would be fine. I am injecting @48 oz of fluid daily. So, I am thinking even 2-3 days wouldn't do great harm. If it happened for many days, I understand that would be an issue. But, I don't see a scenario where the pool goes several days unattended. I suppose the perfect storm of an eight-day vacation and the pump exploding as we leave the driveway exists, but I may just gamble on that.

Any thoughts on better precautions are greatly appreciated.

If you've made it this far, thanks for reading! I hope this inspires someone else to take this on. It is going to make managing the pool a much simpler chore.
 
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rumcglot

Silver Supporter
Feb 13, 2019
95
Texas
That's a great looking setup! I would like to do something similar for muratic acid additions.

I curious what the concern is about getting a lot of chlorine in the filter. What could happen in that case?

Adding a flow switch would really be the only way to make sure you aren't adding chlorine when the system isn't running.
 

Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
Is there any concern over the heat deteriorating the bleach?

I may be mistaken, but I believe light is much more degrading than heat.(at least relative to the fact that chlorine is doing to deplete with age in any case) The barrel is very dense and completely opaque.

While the heat will affect its strength to some degree, I don't think it will be an issue. I use about 2.5 gallons a week and buy it from a locally owned pool supply. His chlorine is typically about as "fresh" as you can find in the area. He is about about $2 a case more expensive than Mendards. I will spend that just to support a local business (and avoid going to Menards)

I have always stored it in the outbuilding anyway, which probably gets hotter than that barrel does. The house blocks almost all of the direct sunlight to the area where the barrel sits.

I don't see me keeping more than 10 gallons or so in it. I think filling once a month is acceptable. I'll just run to his store and get it each time I need it to refill.

Time will tell. If I begin to test significantly less FC with the same dosage as the chlorine ages, we will have some data to consider. I would think if it was a big issue, folks on here using these pumps would have already sounded off about it. Maybe they have and I didn't do the right search!! :)
 
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Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
That's a great looking setup! I would like to do something similar for muratic acid additions.

I curious what the concern is about getting a lot of chlorine in the filter. What could happen in that case?

Adding a flow switch would really be the only way to make sure you aren't adding chlorine when the system isn't running.

Thank you.

I am unsure if there should be great concern, and I am unsure what could happen. I don't think there is significant risk, but the fact remains that it could happen. I posted mostly to get opinions.

I did consider using an "always on" pump (when powered) and a separate timer and flow switch, but it complicated the installation and added costs to the point I decided that my plan was the way to go.
 

mclifford

Well-known member
Aug 29, 2017
189
Van buren, AR
I have been very interested in a setup like this. So far of all the ones I have seen yours has been the most simple and best setup that I have seen.

My equipment pad is in direct sunlight. I suppose if it became an issue I could bury it.
 

lmartins6746

Member
Jun 6, 2018
21
Simpsonville, SC
RE heat. I (mostly) buried my bucket. It is just a 5 gallons though. Burying it works well, I believe I measured the water temp in the buried bucket in the 70s when I was testing. For comparison my pool heats to almost 90 naturally.
 

Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
Maybe Stenner support will chime in on this. Is there any worry of the pump overheating inside the box?

Also very clean look to your equipment pad !! NICE

Thank you.

I walked to the pool a littler earlier to make sure it shut off at the right time. (It did, exactly when expected) I touched the pump housing and other parts inside the box, and there was no discernible difference in heat between the housing and anything else inside or outside the box. It doesn't seem to generate much heat, if any. It's turning VERY slow. I am sure it is geared down somehow to get enough torque to pinch the rollers, but I don't think it is working that hard.
 

Stenner Tech Support

In The Industry
Apr 14, 2020
64
Florida
Maybe Stenner support will chime in on this. Is there any worry of the pump overheating inside the box?

Also very clean look to your equipment pad !! NICE
The maximum operating temperature for the ECON-T pump is 104 F. We are attaching the manual. WE can be contacted here.
 

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DanF

Silver Supporter
Mar 17, 2019
307
Chandler, AZ
Thanks for posting the details of your Stenner install. I'm getting the itch, but won't be able to pull the trigger until September.
Using a couple of short lengths of pipe, two 1.5" slip-to-buttress fittings and the T fitting above, I fashioned a system that matched the length and fitting style of the ionizer and it's associated transition fittings. I almost decided not to post this pic because my PVC gluing job was embarrassingly messy. So much so, that I may get more fittings and make another one. I just have to decide if it's worth $15 dollars to not see the blue slop all over it every time I look at it. But, it doesn't leak, so I guess that's not too awful for a first timer.
I don't think your plumbing job looks bad at all. Instead of re-plumbing you could always spray-paint the PVC. Question; In an earlier post you contemplated placing the injection point on the vertical section of your return line, as a control against running the Stenner without the pool pump running. Any reason you decided against that?
 
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Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
Thanks for posting the details of your Stenner install. I'm getting the itch, but won't be able to pull the trigger until September.

I don't think your plumbing job looks bad at all. Instead of re-plumbing you could always spray-paint the PVC. Question; In an earlier post you contemplated placing the injection point on the vertical section of your return line, as a control against running the Stenner with the pump running. Any reason you decided against that?
Good question. In the end, I decided to cut up as little plumbing as possible. So, that was the primary driver. Because that section was coupled with butress fittings by the installer, I could just unscrew it and fabricate a same length fitting.

But also, that part of the plumbing actually pitched down slightly towards the return side, so if there is flow without the pump running, the majority of the fluid will lean and flow toward the return and not the filter as the chlorine is heavier than water.

As I went through the various scenarios of failure, it just felt like the likelihood of actually damaging something was so minimal that the easiest way actually made sense.
 
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