Moved to new home with Pool Frog

welli1sj

New member
Jun 6, 2019
1
Illinois
Hello,

I'm new to this community and it's great to have a forum such as this to answer everyone's questions! Recently we moved into a new home that has an above ground pool and has a pool frog set up. We are in the process of getting it ready for the season and I'll admit the previous owner kept everything in great condition. However, reading up on the pool frog, I'm seeing that it's a waste of money. When I look at what is currently with my pool, last year's mineral pack is still hooked up in the pool frog and I have a number of extra "torpedo packs" for the chlorine that I can then put in.

From a neighbor I spoke to who has had their pool for a while, shocking the water throughout the season is the main focus to keep the pool in good condition. Beyond that, there isn't much more required (from what I've been told). My question is, with the pool frog still hooked up, am I ok leaving the old mineral pack in the pool frog and simply not replacing it? My thought was it would be easier to just leave the old one in there than try and take everyone apart. If anyone has any recommendations on what I should do with the old mineral pack and the chlorine packs (torpedo packs), that would be greatly appreciated! I'm new to pools and just want to make sure I don't cause more damage by trying to over-simplify things or take things apart.

Thanks!

Steve
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Hi Steve and welcome! :wave: I would not replenish the mineral packs. They will just ad metals to the water (copper) and over time you could have a problem on your hands. Just stick to liquid chlorine (aka regular bleach) to increase and maintain the proper FC level. See FC/CYA Chart. Leaving the equipment in-place shouldn't be a problem.

I would however make sure to have a TF-100 (link below) or Taylor K-2006C test kit at all times. See Test Kits Compared. The old methodology of "shocking" once a week or things like that is old-school and never a good idea. Visit our ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry to learn more.