Measuring high PH

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
118
Apple Valley, CA
Using Taylor K2006 the PH is in the red area however, I am really guessing the exact measurement 7.8 - 8++. If I add 1 drop of Acid demand the reading drops to 7.4. Alkalinity 60 so I'm trying to keep PH higher so CSI stays closer to zero. Is there a more reliable accurate way to measure high PH?
 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
118
Apple Valley, CA
Has anyone tried this for higher ph levels?

 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
118
Apple Valley, CA
Picking-out the color shades, especially in the upper 7s, can be tough for some. Is there any chance your FC is elevated? Say 10 or more? We know that will skew your pH reading.


No. The Chlorine is 7.5, CYA 60, PH Red, Alk60, CH 500
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Some like the meters, others find them a bit questionable due to calibration issues. To each their own. In your case, we can safely assume the pH is at least 8.2. Using the PoolMath tool, with an assumed water temp of about 75 (wasn't sure), I would add 1.5 cups of muriatic acid to your 21.6K pool. That would ideally lower it to about 7.8, but you aren't completely sure how high the pH actually is. So give it about 30-60 minutes then test again and continue that process in stages until you feel comfortable you've reached a good pH goal. A pH of 7.4-7.6 gets you to a slightly negative CSI.

Keep an eye on the TA. The acid additions might pull the TA down as well. Don't go any lower than 50.
 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
118
Apple Valley, CA
Some like the meters, others find them a bit questionable due to calibration issues. To each their own. In your case, we can safely assume the pH is at least 8.2. Using the PoolMath tool, with an assumed water temp of about 75 (wasn't sure), I would add 1.5 cups of muriatic acid to your 21.6K pool. That would ideally lower it to about 7.8, but you aren't completely sure how high the pH actually is. So give it about 30-60 minutes then test again and continue that process in stages until you feel comfortable you've reached a good pH goal. A pH of 7.4-7.6 gets you to a slightly negative CSI.

Keep an eye on the TA. The acid additions might pull the TA down as well. Don't go any lower than 50.
Actual water temperature is 54. Thanks for suggesting of slowly lowering ph to where I can read it, that might work for me.
 

SteelBlue

Well-known member
Jul 4, 2019
81
Scottsdale, AZ
Has anyone tried this for higher ph levels?

I was having similar issues trying to read the Taylor pH color, and bought the pH meter shown above. I do use it. You'll need to buy a bottle of 7.0 pH calibration solution and check the meter in this every time you check the pool pH. Calibrating it to 7.0 is a bit of a pain. Self calibrating meters are available for a higher price. I think the best advice I had was to use 4 drops of phenol red instead of 5. It seems to match the colors better.
 
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Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
118
Apple Valley, CA
I was having similar issues trying to read the Taylor pH color, and bought the pH meter shown above. I do use it. You'll need to buy a bottle of 7.0 pH calibration solution and check the meter in this every time you check the pool pH. Calibrating it to 7.0 is a bit of a pain. Self calibrating meters are available for a higher price. I think the best advice I had was to use 4 drops of phenol red instead of 5. It seems to match the colors better.
When you use 4 drops doesn't the 7.8 measurement appear to be 7.2, or lower?
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
When you use 4 drops doesn't the 7.8 measurement appear to be 7.2, or lower?
It has more an impact of the ability to view the changes in the color hues as opposed to actually lowering the color on the viewing block. Just seems to help some owners differentiate a bit better. I try it sometimes as well. Those upper 7s give me a fit. :crazy:
 
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