Master Spas New Jets

RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
1,696
Cabool, Mo
Who are "they"? 🤔🤫
I have heard about a new style of jet that uses a press-in seal but haven't seen any myself. Therefore I have no opinion yet.
Theoretically, I'm torn. Press-in could have advantages in longevity and ease of repair, depending on design and installation variables (such as foam insulation). However, they could just as easily be a leak nightmare, especially in cases of poor chemistry. I'd like to think they've been thoroughly tested, the spa jet business is fairly competitive, but then I look at some of the other bad ideas that have been tried over the years and have my doubts. It also wouldn't be the first time in history a product was designed to break faster than necessary (not saying this was, just saying).
Time will tell. I'm comfy on the fence for the moment.😉
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
33,997
Master Spas uses Balboa control systems and Waterways pumps which are the best OEM components available and, until two years ago, used Waterways jets as well.

However, at that time, they moved to the newer CMP jets.

This is an illustration of how these people let the engineers decide what’s best and keep the marketing folks away from the drawing table.

CMP jets are next generation and are compression fitted to the shell without the use of silicone.

This technology virtually eliminates the possibility of jets leaking in the future.

Master is the first manufacturer to move to this new tech but we think other high-end brands will follow suit.

 

Methuselah

Well-known member
May 9, 2022
251
Alabama
$7.45 as opposed to an older tub's average price for jets being $15 - $27.

I did visit the review site before. All I guess anyone can say is what @RDspaguy points out ... time will tell. It is spray in foam insulated. Not too expensive to run but I presume it's a nightmare to fix any leaks.

We've had it running 8 or 9 months now and I gave all the jets a spin through adjustment range, only one or two that were gritty or hard to turn and they eased up after some back and forth. Maybe I should disassemble all of them and apply some kind of silicone grease to keep them from seizing? I think the manual had a little spiel on how they come apart...
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
33,997





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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
33,997

RADIAL SEALS

Traditional jet assemblies (consisting of a nut, gasket and comp ring) seal by compression. SQR seals by radial force.

This creates a robust seal as the SQR “grommet” makes complete contact with the properly sized hole.

This eliminates the need for calibrated torque tools as required with compression systems.

As long as the hole size is consistent the radial seal works the same way every time.

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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
33,997
Apparently two years ago they changed over from Waterway to a new type compression fitting that doesn't use silicone sealant.
The SQR came out about 7 years ago, but not sure when Master Spas switched to the SQR design.

SQR™ PATENTED INSTALLATION SYSTEM November 2, 2015.

 

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RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
1,696
Cabool, Mo
Maybe I should disassemble all of them and apply some kind of silicone grease to keep them from seizing?
Noooo!!!
Remove them, yes. Once a year at least.
Clean them too, and maybe soak in vinegar or 10% muriatic if they have scale or the rotating parts are sticking.
But do not, I repeat; DO NOT put any type of lube on them. Not even spray silicone. It becomes a debris trap that will ruin your jets.
If they are siezing from grit behind the jet, get a pair of cheap panty hose (old school) or
They come in different sizes, so get the ones that fit your tub.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
33,997
Pump seals are push in type seals and they do ok.

The seal quality depends on the strength of the rubber grommet and the strength of the shell and how much force you can use to push the seal into place.

I don't know that the characterization of it being a "Superior" seal is accurate as they claim.

Either method can fail.

It will probably take several years before there are enough reviews to be significant enough to determine the reliability of the SQR seal type.
 

Methuselah

Well-known member
May 9, 2022
251
Alabama
Noooo!!!
Remove them, yes. Once a year at least.
Clean them too, and maybe soak in vinegar or 10% muriatic if they have scale or the rotating parts are sticking.
But do not, I repeat; DO NOT put any type of lube on them. Not even spray silicone. It becomes a debris trap that will ruin your jets.
If they are siezing from grit behind the jet, get a pair of cheap panty hose (old school) or
They come in different sizes, so get the ones that fit your tub.

Bad choice of words, not disassemble, I meant remove the jets from their sockets. Hair net is for the inlet(s)? Never seen that, thanks!