amityeric

Active member
Jul 2, 2021
28
Vancouver, WA
Pool Size
17415
Surface
Vinyl
I am new to this whole pool game. Right now I’m using Trichlor, but I’m interested in using liquid chlorine based on what I’ve been reading.

My CYA was 5 when I started, so I added some stabilizer, and now it is 44. I wish I had not added quite so much stabilizer. at least I can keep chlorine in my pool now.

I can easily drain some of the pool and then continue using Trichlor throughout the summer, but I’d rather use liquid chlorine.

One thing I would like to do is budget. So I’m trying to figure out if using liquid chlorine will be more or less expensive than using Trichlor.

That being said, I’m a little bit confused on how much liquid chlorine I would actually need to use in my pool. I have the pool math app, but I’m still a little bit confused about how to go about calculating how much I’m going to need. And do I need a dispenser or do I just dump it in? Every day? Every other day?

Any help getting started would be appreciated.
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Well. that is a loaded questions. your FC demand is going to be based on your pool conditions. More direct sunlight =more Cl burn off, more swimmers= more FC used to sanitize. The time of year will play into as well as the middle of the summer the sun is higher compared to the fall and spring... SOOO it depends. In general you can count on 4-5 ppm daily in the peak of the summer. How that translates to your pool depends on the volume and other factors. You will figure out your pools chlorine usage by tracking it over time... That is why testing is so useful.. I hope that makes sense.
 
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Msch99

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Jun 11, 2018
1,015
Verona, MO
Not an expert but I feel I can safely say that continual use of tricolor will eventually be more expensive. CYA levels will rise which means you will need more chlorine to fight algae and maintain a safe pool due to cya tying up chlorine. Then you either need to drain pool to lower the cya or risk needing to slam to fight algae. Which is expensive at high cya levels. (high as in > 70 or 80). Could convert to salt pool and use swg to produce chlorine. Costs about the same in long run, but swg is up front so you will know the cost right away. Only need extra chlorine for start up and if have algae bloom for slamming.
No dispenser needed for liquid chlorine, pour pencil thin stream at return. Daily addition generally needed so you won’t add excessive amount that disappears quickly and also daily helps maintain safe level.
See chlorine/cya chart in my signature. Also peruse through pool school and forum threads for information.

I don’t see a test kit listed…if you don’t have your own, see test kits compared and order your own right away. TF100 is a good buy considering it has a good reagent mix for most users. If you buy Taylor 2006, make sure it is 2006-C kit, or you will be ordering reagents rather quickly. Both include FAS/DPD chlorine tester which you will also need for proper testing.
Good luck!
 
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Msch99

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Jun 11, 2018
1,015
Verona, MO
FYI, the CYA test is algorithmic, so 44 counts as 50 for your cya level provided you used Taylor kit. If pool store test, don’t adjust, can’t be sure what it is. They vary too much. Check forum, many threads on variability comparing tests from same store even.

I used test (guess) strips when started, said cya was low, next test said too high!!!!! After added cya. Had to drain pool once I got my own kit.
in your case, Even if easy to drain, you now have to start over rebalancing everything .
 
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