leaking chlorinator vs. air in the lines

poolgirl22

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Apr 14, 2010
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Stephens City, VA
I have a dilemma.
I bypassed my EMPTY chlorinator last week rather than letting the water flow thru it empty.
Then I noticed some air in the return jet.

Yesterday I turned the chlorinator back on (it's all cleaned out, empty), put the lid back on and air left the line.
However, now the lid to the chlorinator is leaking. Slowly, but like a drippy faucet. That thing is a pain in my .....
I plan to run the lid by the pool place and see if a new seal is available and if that solves the problem.

So, do I continue to bypass the chlorinator and deal with the aeration in the return line and the associated effects, or deal with the leak for now and have no air in line until I can have the blasted thing taken off completely. Which is better/worse in the short term of the summer.

Speak slowly.

Regardless of the opinion, the chlorinator is getting removed at the end of the season.

Could my plumbing guy who fixes all the other plumbing issues in the house handle the job rather than the pool company? Have to call him out to fix a couple other things so I usually wait until I have a list...

Thoughts?
 

duraleigh

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Good Morning, pg,

The leak will do you no harm just letting air in the pool. You could leave it in that condition for as long as you like.

Your regular plumber, on his next visit, should be able to remove the entire device and that, of course will stop the leak.

If you choose, you could also do this yourself. Working with PVC is fairly easy and there are lot's of us here that could talk you through it.

We have all seen your determination and tendency to grasp things quickly so, even if you've never glued a piece of pipe, it is well within your abilities.
 

poolgirl22

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Apr 14, 2010
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Stephens City, VA
Thanks. You have much confidence master duraleigh...lol..
My regular plumber is really reasonable so I may just add it to the list.
I'm sure I could do it and hubby is pretty good at following directions too, so we'll see. But not now. Leak stopped and air in line will do for now.
 

poolgirl22

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Apr 14, 2010
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Stephens City, VA
Pressure side leak?
Now don't go using those technical terms with me... :cool:

I didn't see how either which is why I was surprised and posed the question.

I assumed it was the pump basket (which I'm assuming is a NON pressure side???) as I cleaned it out around the same time. But, it is tight and not getting air...looks like no water is in it at all in fact because there's not a single bubble. Just the swirling of the one leaf that got thru after the storm last night :grrrr:

All I know is when I have the lid on and the chlorinator is open/on, I get no air in the return line. If I turn it off, I get air. Not much..just sounds like there's sand going through the return line and tiniest bubbles come out...like a spa jet only not that bad, but fine little bubbles.
 

duraleigh

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mits,

I don't see how a pressure-side leak would cause air in the lines.
That's a good question and this may not be a good answer.

I believe an inline chlorinator relies on a venturi effect to move the water through it....in other words, the psi in the chlorinator is less than in the return pipe.
 

Melt In The Sun

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Oct 29, 2009
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Tucson, AZ
Nope! Get those fingers out and listen up: :whip:

Before pump = suction side. After pump = pressure side. Suction side leaks will suck air into the system. Pressure side leaks will squirt water out of the system.

Venturi effect: imagine a pipe with water moving really fast. Poke a hole in it. Air will be sucked in rather than water blown out. I don't know how that relates to a tab feeder, since I don't have one!
 

poolgirl22

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Apr 14, 2010
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Stephens City, VA
Melt In The Sun said:
Nope! Get those fingers out and listen up: :whip:

Before pump = suction side. After pump = pressure side. Gotcha.Suction side leaks will suck air into the system. Been there done that. Pressure side leaks will squirt water out of the system.

Venturi effect: imagine a pipe with water moving really fast. Poke a hole in it. Air will be sucked in rather than water blown out. I don't know how that relates to a tab feeder, since I don't have one!
Well in that case I do believe Dave is right about the tab feeder and venturi...when it's empty of water (on bypass) there's air in it and has tiny holes in it (along the outgoing flow pipe) that allow water in and then out if it were being used. And even though it's technically OFF/bypassed, well, I can tell you, it may not be totally off, letting air in, in other words, because the dial is just plastic and an O ring and has never been accurate in determining off, half, full....

Still just shutting it as off as I can get it and enjoying my new 'spa like' jet..

Thanks for the lesson. I knew a simple answer was not likely... :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: ( I just play a silly girl on TV, I really am following what you are saying, but if I always act like I know what I'm doing or need, then the whole damsel in distress thing goes away...and that IS kind of handy sometimes... :goodjob: )
 

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