is this blue?

mknauss

Mod Squad
May 3, 2014
12,264
Laughlin, NV
#2
No. The end result is more blue than violet.

It is nearly impossible to do a CH test at high levels without the Speedstir.

I suspect your CH is north of 1000 ppm.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
May 3, 2014
12,264
Laughlin, NV
#7
You need to monitor CSI. I have never had to clean my SWCG.

Fill water here is 250 ppm CH and 130 ppm TA. My CH hits 800 ppm in just under 16 months.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
May 3, 2014
12,264
Laughlin, NV
#11
Some depends on your water supplier. Do you get charged sewer fees based on water use? Check into that. Otherwise, now is a great time.

How old is the plaster? Be aware when you drain a pool with old plaster there is always a chance of plaster de-lamination in spots.
 

an1vrsy

Bronze Supporter
Jul 10, 2018
57
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
#12
Hi Oceansol, Although I’m north from your location in south Orange County, when I drained and refilled my pool in July, I called the water company to give them a heads up. In this way, if there were any restrictions, the phone rep could/would have told me. There wasn’t any restrictions.

Another thing, when you fill, check your water meter when you start and when complete. You’ll have a pretty accurate way of your determining your pool water volume. Good luck. The TFP way is the only way to go.
 

Oceansol

Well-known member
May 26, 2015
45
Oceanside, California
#13
Some depends on your water supplier. Do you get charged sewer fees based on water use? Check into that. Otherwise, now is a great time.

How old is the plaster? Be aware when you drain a pool with old plaster there is always a chance of plaster de-lamination in spots.
Yes, water and sewer are together, but we never worried about it when we drained it before. We didn't even see a change in our bill.

The plaster (and the pool) are 10 years old and looks in great shape. When I did it before I started filling it as soon as it was drained. Seems like now when it's cool would be best.

- - - Updated - - -

Hi Oceansol, Although I’m north from your location in south Orange County, when I drained and refilled my pool in July, I called the water company to give them a heads up. In this way, if there were any restrictions, the phone rep could/would have told me. There wasn’t any restrictions.

Another thing, when you fill, check your water meter when you start and when complete. You’ll have a pretty accurate way of your determining your pool water volume. Good luck. The TFP way is the only way to go.
Great tips, thanks!
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
9,087
Evans, Georgia
#14
Being that you're an a hard water area, when your CH inches up you can help dilute it down a bit again by harnessing any rain water you're expecting. Just drop the pool level an inch or so and let the rain re-fill it. This over time along with monitoring your pH/CSI numbers can help thwart scale problems.

Maddie :flower:
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
12,835
#15
The sample may turn purple during the test, or go to blue for a moment and then turn back to red/pink. This is called a "fading endpoint" and is caused by interference from metal ions. If this happens, do the test again, but this time add five drops of R-0012 before adding any R-0010 or R-0011L. Remember to count the initial five drops in the total.
In extreme cases, a fading endpoint may occur even when adding five drops of R-0012 at the start. If that happens, mix pool water with an equal quantity of distilled water, test that, and then multiply the result by two.
Extended Test Kit Directions

Try to get your CSI down to 0 as soon as possible. I would suggest a sequestrant to help control scale and metals.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
May 3, 2014
12,264
Laughlin, NV
#17
No sequestrant is needed for metals. Your area does not have any in the water. If you are draining then none for scale is needed either. Scale sequestrant is a consumable item (have to add constantly) and just hides an issue you can manage with proper chemistry.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
12,835
#18
If you're going to drain and refill, you don't need the sequestrant.

A sequestrant is a product that combines with metals and calcium to keep them in solution. Example:

http://jacksmagic.com/product/salt-solution-the-purple-stuff/

If you don't have metals, then you don't need the sequestrant.

Calcium can be managed by keeping the CSI between -0.3 and 0.0.

Be careful about draining the pool. If the ground water is high, the pool can float out of the ground.
 

Oceansol

Well-known member
May 26, 2015
45
Oceanside, California
#19
No sequestrant is needed for metals. Your area does not have any in the water. If you are draining then none for scale is needed either. Scale sequestrant is a consumable item (have to add constantly) and just hides an issue you can manage with proper chemistry.
That's what I figured. We will drain and refil this coming weekend. I'll rent a pump at home depot and will immediately refil.

Can I use Pool Math to calculate how many bags of salt, and how much CYA I need to add?