Iron Levels for fill

shoot-straight

Well-known member
May 17, 2016
45
Kennedyville, MD
#1
2 questions. Almost time to uncover and open the pool. I will have to add water most likely. Our well water has some (but not super high) iron in it. Dont know the exact amount, will be investing in a kit. What is the level where it becomes a problem? I of course had to add a bit of water from time to time last year, and I had to pump it down a few times as well. I do realize that it can accumulate over time but how much is too much?

I could pay for a tanker (partial), or try one of the iron "disposable filters"? Of course the store says they work great, some say they dont. Others say they only work up to a certain point. Thoughts?

We have a softener, but Im not about to run all that water through it.
 

JVTrain

TFP Expert
Feb 3, 2014
5,080
Central Minnesota
#2
0.3 ppm is the general rule for iron that will start to cause staining problems. However, if you allow your pH to climb into the 8.0 range, you can get staining at lower concentrations than that.

If you can avoid water with iron in it, I would do so.
 
Apr 13, 2017
5
Miamisburg, OH
#6
Our well has high iron, about 5-8ppm depending on time of year. We use a whole house sediment filter to get the 'red out' and then follow-on with a water softener. The water softener does the brunt of the work and removes the clear water iron. We fill our pool using a line connected to water softener - this seems to address our issues without spending a ton on supplemental chemicals. The softener also removes other hardness.

Really, we should have a dedicated backflushing iron filter - but our PH seems good and our setup seems to be working fine. The softener resin seems fine and it's been working this way for a few years without issue.
 

JVTrain

TFP Expert
Feb 3, 2014
5,080
Central Minnesota
#8
thanks for the info. tested yesterday, the well is .4 and my tap is 0 (didnt register on the test, softener)

likely am going to bring in the truckload. gonna test it before they dump though.
That's a good move. Not worth trying to save a few bucks and the extra hassle of an iron filter. If it's municipal water, you should be able to look up the metals content from their most recent testing via a city or county website.