Intex rectangular ultra-frame 24x12 setup question

Chrizzo

New member
May 17, 2012
1
#1
So I have a 24X12 intex I'm currently filling. Did not do a sand base, just hard flat dirt like the instructions said. The issue I'm having is I used concrete pavers under the support legs, and the instructions say to have them flush but the picture just shows it sitting on the ground... I started to dig the first one out to make it flush but the leg barely would stand on it, it kept swinging in towards the pool. I checked the ground with a laser level before starting and the entire area is good +/- 1/2", but with the legs feeling loose I decided to just leave the pavers on top of the ground like in the picture.

Now it's about 1/2 full, and the long sides are bowing in as I've read is normal. I'm just getting nervous about the pads being too high. Even if the outer edge is a bit taller, the concrete edges won't touch the liner like it would if I had a round frame pool...but still I'm worried about putting too much strain on the liner if this is not correct.

Has anyone put this type of pool up without burying the pavers? I could post a few pics later but thought I'd ask to see if anyone has done it this way. Thanks in advance if anyone can help.
 

linen

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 30, 2010
8,649
Twin Cities, MN
#2
Welcome to tfp, Chrizzo :wave:

From the intex manual:
If the ground is not concrete (i.e., if it is asphalt, lawn or earth) you must place a piece
of pressure-treated wood, size 15” x 15” x 1.2” (38 x 38 x 3cm), under each U-shaped
support and flush with the ground. Alternatively you may use steel pads or reinforced
tiles.
The accompanying picture shows the wood being set on the ground (and not dug in).
 

sumaut

New member
Apr 24, 2016
3
grand junction, co
#3
How did this work our for you? I am dealing with the same issue.


So I have a 24X12 intex I'm currently filling. Did not do a sand base, just hard flat dirt like the instructions said. The issue I'm having is I used concrete pavers under the support legs, and the instructions say to have them flush but the picture just shows it sitting on the ground... I started to dig the first one out to make it flush but the leg barely would stand on it, it kept swinging in towards the pool. I checked the ground with a laser level before starting and the entire area is good +/- 1/2", but with the legs feeling loose I decided to just leave the pavers on top of the ground like in the picture.

Now it's about 1/2 full, and the long sides are bowing in as I've read is normal. I'm just getting nervous about the pads being too high. Even if the outer edge is a bit taller, the concrete edges won't touch the liner like it would if I had a round frame pool...but still I'm worried about putting too much strain on the liner if this is not correct.

Has anyone put this type of pool up without burying the pavers? I could post a few pics later but thought I'd ask to see if anyone has done it this way. Thanks in advance if anyone can help.
 

Schnozz

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 6, 2015
277
Charter Oak, California
#5
From my own experience....You have to pay attention to this and be sure the ground under the pavers or pressure treated lumber is well supported. Well tamped earth, gravel base and then the pavers or lumber LEVEL with the ground. You would think the pavers are sufficiently strong to hold up, but they are not. . I set mine up last year and as it was filling I heard loud pops now and then over a three hour period. Thought the liner was just stretching or re-adjusting or something. When I checked around the pool after it was full, lo and behold I lost about half the pavers. Remember, if it's not set up on concrete, well tamped earth, well tamped gravel base that the pavers or pressure treated lumber sit on top of, level with the area where the bottom of the pool sits. We're taking ours down to pour a concrete pad in a month or so I think I'll have rectified the situation. Hope everything goes well. The image from Mickelin is a great example...
 

jmcdtucson

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2014
332
Tucson, AZ
#6
I recommend 4" thick pavers. 2" can work. Or it might not. I've never heard of anyone having 4" pavers fail.
And yes the top of the paver should be flush with the ground.