Installed AOP Did I do the wrong thing?

rbronnie

Member
Aug 11, 2019
8
Pomona, NY
I am currently building a pool. I installed an AOP system thinking I was doing one step better then a salt system. I am quickly realizing that that may not be the case. What do I do?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
21,992
Laughlin, NV
Welcome to the forum!
A couple articles to read:

I assume the AOP is an ozone system. How are you chlorinating?

I suggest you read ABC's of Pool Water Chemistry.
 

rbronnie

Member
Aug 11, 2019
8
Pomona, NY
Yes, I’ve been running my pump 24/7 and chlorinating either by liquid chlorine or pucks. I had a pool guy mess up early on by raising the ph and alk and making everything cloudy. Water is crystal now but I’m wondering how to stay in the .5-1ppm residual. I’m either at .5 or 3-5.
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Jun 12, 2009
3,881
NW Ohio
Welcome to TFP!

A saltwater generator would have provided you with chlorine which your pool needs. An AOP system provides... well nothing really. Extra oxidation, which chlorine already provides. It provides zero sanitation which is why you still require chlorine in the pool. No matter what the sales pitch implies it does not reduce the amount of chlorine required to keep the water sanitary.

Sorry, but it's junk and whomever sold it to you is more interested in making a buck than what is best for your pool water. It is not new, no matter how much they want to convince you that it's some new cutting edge discovery that's more advanced than chlorine. It is not better than chlorine because it doesn't replace chlorine. Very importantly though is we do not recommend running "low residual" chlorine. Never. It's not sanitary, it's not more safe, and there is no benefit to doing it.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
21,992
Laughlin, NV
There are no ozone regulators. They never say that it is a sanitizer. That would be deceptive advertising. EPA only recognizes three sanitizers; chlorine, bromine, and biguanide.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,767
Tucson, AZ
It’s both UV + Ozone. DEL AOP PRODUCTS - CMP

I have the 50 model with the degassing.

It was recommended due to having an automatic cover.
Ok. So it’s not as disastrous as it first seems. The Del Ozone systems are actually quite good and the latest models have field-replaceable corona discharge (CD) modules which is a huge step up for previous generations where you had to scrap the entire unit once the CD module failed. The off-gassing and contact tank is a good idea too because you want ozonated water to sit in a tank and slowly degas to get the most effective sanitation process.

You still need chlorine though. So you want to aim for a CYA of about 30-50ppm and keep your FC at least at the minimum level. That will help to keep algae at bay. With ozone around, there will be some slightly increased chlorine loss, but the degassing tank should help to reduce that a bit.

Is the unit plumbed in a series configuration or a parallel configuration? In other words, does all the water flowing through your pump and filter flow through the ozone system or does the ozone system run in parallel to the main water flow?

Are you chlorinating with a puck feeder, SWG or manual chlorine additions ?
 

JJ_Tex

Bronze Supporter
Jul 17, 2019
224
Prosper, TX (DFW)
I'm a newbie and not nearly as technical as others on there, but reading about AOP is interesting especially that system. There is no getting around chlorine in your pool, but it could be an added boost.

Since you already have it, play around with it and report back. Maybe its snake oil, or maybe it is something that gives you flexibility in your chlorine levels over a traditional chlorine only pool.
 

rbronnie

Member
Aug 11, 2019
8
Pomona, NY
Ok. So it’s not as disastrous as it first seems. The Del Ozone systems are actually quite good and the latest models have field-replaceable corona discharge (CD) modules which is a huge step up for previous generations where you had to scrap the entire unit once the CD module failed. The off-gassing and contact tank is a good idea too because you want ozonated water to sit in a tank and slowly degas to get the most effective sanitation process.

You still need chlorine though. So you want to aim for a CYA of about 30-50ppm and keep your FC at least at the minimum level. That will help to keep algae at bay. With ozone around, there will be some slightly increased chlorine loss, but the degassing tank should help to reduce that a bit.

Is the unit plumbed in a series configuration or a parallel configuration? In other words, does all the water flowing through your pump and filter flow through the ozone system or does the ozone system run in parallel to the main water flow?

Are you chlorinating with a puck feeder, SWG or manual chlorine additions ?
Yes, it’s plumbed in parallel. I can adjust with valves if I want to change that.

Yes I know I need clorine. They recommend .5 to 1ppm. That is how I started my conversation. I want some guidance on how to accomplish that.

I like the idea of pucks in skimmers. Less work that way.

I test daily and really just want to make sure the pool is safe and clean.
 

JJ_Tex

Bronze Supporter
Jul 17, 2019
224
Prosper, TX (DFW)
The pucks in skimmers are convenient, but not recommended here because they raise your CYA and you dont need or want that most of the time as it just ups your chlorine requirements. Liquid chlorine (bleach) or Salt Water generated chlorine are the recommended methods and do not add CYA.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,767
Tucson, AZ
Ok good to know. It was recommended that I stay away from salt to prevent the auto cover from corroding.
Salt is not the issue for auto covers. Any pool that uses chlorine, whether that’s a chlorinating compound OR muriatic acid for pH control, will build up chloride ions (Cl-, aka “salt”) over time. A swimming pool will always have higher TDS than any other water source.

What kills a cover is the use of incompatible metals on the track. Many cover tracks are made of aluminum and are often fastened into place using cheap, low grade steel screws. The incompatible metals create galvanic corrosion that leads to failure.

As for pucks in the skimmer, that’s not a good idea. Trichlor is very acidic. If you leave a puck in the skimmer without the pump running, the water in there will become very corrosive (low pH) and highly chlorinated. You will then send a charge of very low pH water through your plumbing when the pump turns on. That can be very bad for equipment, especially heaters. If you don’t have an in-line puck chlorinator, then it’s best to use a puck floater in the pool. You can only use trichlor until your CYA gets up to 50ppm and then you should switch to liquid chlorine or else you’re CYA will be too high and you’ll get over-stabilization problems.

If your ozone system is plumbed in parallel, then leave it be and let it help with bather waste oxidation. If you keep your FC/CYA ratio at TFP recommended levels, you’ll never have problems with algae. If you let your FC get too low relative to your CYA, algae can take hold very quickly.