Installation Options on RJ-45 Plus

Captchaos

Bronze Supporter
Jul 18, 2017
288
Maryland
I am just about to order the Circupool RJ-45 Plus and am trying to figure out the best and easiest way to install the cell and the flow switch. My plumbing was not designed particularly well for this but fortunately plumbing is fairly easy as long as you plan everything out well ahead of time. So that's where this thread comes in!

I have attached a picture below. I have a chlorinator that I don't use, but I feel like I should probably leave it in place just in case. The water has an alternate route around the chlorinator to the left (labeled A), which is 17.5" of straight pipe. The vertical pipe (labeled B) that then connects with the pipe from the chlorinator and returns to the pool is 13.5".

I know you aren't supposed to mount the cell where the water has a route to return to the pool possibly unchlorinated, but I want to leave the chlorinator in place and will just close the valve to it when not in use (almost always). Does anyone see an issue with me installing the cell in the pipe labeled A and the flow switch in the pipe labeled B?

The RJ-45 cell is 13.5" with unions and the flow switch is 4", so I can't install both in the pipe labeled A.

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 2.48.28 PM.jpg
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
1,536
Marrietta Ga
If it were mine I would remove the chlorinator completely. You will never use it again and may cause problems down the road. I just installed my EDge 40 and tossed my chlorinator in the trash :)
Then install the flow switch behind the existing chlorinator and cell between that and your returns.
You can probably buy a new fitting for your filter fairly cheap and start over
I
 

Captchaos

Bronze Supporter
Jul 18, 2017
288
Maryland
If it were mine I would remove the chlorinator completely. You will never use it again and may cause problems down the road. I just installed my EDge 40 and tossed my chlorinator in the trash :)
Then install the flow switch behind the existing chlorinator and cell between that and your returns.
You can probably buy a new fitting for your filter fairly cheap and start over
I
Thanks, I figured that would be the response. I am not sure why I want to keep it because it is basically worthless and I didn't use it either of the last two seasons at all. You're probably right, I should just ditch everything after the filter and start over with a new union.
 

Brett S

Well-known member
Mar 15, 2019
449
Orlando
I know you aren't supposed to mount the cell where the water has a route to return to the pool possibly unchlorinated, but I want to leave the chlorinator in place and will just close the valve to it when not in use (almost always). Does anyone see an issue with me installing the cell in the pipe labeled A and the flow switch in the pipe labeled B?
Getting rid of the chlorinator is really probably the best option, but just a quick note about your proposed installation. The warning in the manual isn’t a concern about water returning to the pool unchlorinated, but rather a warning about not having enough flow through the SWG cell. Because the SWG cell produces hydrogen gas in addition to chlorine if there is no or very low flow through the cell while the cell is energized then it’s possible that the hydrogen could build up in the cell and explode. The flow switch is one safeguard that the SWG uses to make sure that there is enough water flowing through the cell so this can’t happen.

However, if the flow switch is installed on one section of the pipe and the cell is installed on another section and there are valves that can be configured such that the flow switch will get more flow than the cell does, then this important safety feature is defeated. In your case, that rules out your installation option because the valve could be opened to the chlorinator, which would reduce the flow going through the cell installed in pipe A, but the flow switch installed after the T in pipe B would not see the reduction in flow.

The other concern about the chlorinator is that when the pump is off, if there are pucks in the chlorinator they will still slowly dissolve and create very acidic water in the pipes around the chlorinator. This water acidic water could make it’s way into your expensive salt cell and damage it. I think you’re really better off just getting rid of it.
 
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markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
1,536
Marrietta Ga
Thanks, I figured that would be the response. I am not sure why I want to keep it because it is basically worthless and I didn't use it either of the last two seasons at all. You're probably right, I should just ditch everything after the filter and start over with a new union.
Yea, take your time and do it how you want it..I even bought PVC glue on amazon to avoid going out :) But did find out I like the thicker stuff.

I can relate, my chlorinator was about a year old and I hated to toss it
 
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