I too noticed that my TA was high at 130

IL_WS

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2012
125
IL, NW of Chicago
I finally just opened my pool for the season. I haven't done all not remeasurements yet, but estimated CYA based on what I had last year and the water added (from 50 to 37 with 25% water added). I raised the FC to shock level (15), and will monitor overnight. However, I too noticed that my TA was high at 130, and my pre-shock PH was 7.2. I started aerating as best I can by pointing the jet upward. However, I recall reading last year that PH readings are not accurate with high FC levels; how do I proceed if this is the case?

I'll also add that I just added a heater, and I am kind of freaked out about maintaining proper PH levels for the sake of the life of the metal. Any reasurring or corrective words that can guide me?
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
Do not assume that your CYA is unchanged from last year. ALWAYS start with a full set of test results. Your CYA may have dropped to 0 over the winter ... or maybe it did not. Easy to find out by testing.

Ignore TA. That was a fine pH to start the shock process. You are right the pH test is artificially high when FC > 10ppm.
 

IL_WS

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2012
125
IL, NW of Chicago
Thanks for your input. I now plan to test CYA tonight. I was under the impression that it didn't deteriorate over the winter (don't remember where I got that idea from).

Are you saying ignore TA totally, or just here at startup? From last year's experience, I did see PH continually rise, so I expect a slow decrease of TA due to addition of muratic acid.

Related to PH rise, would borates help stabilize or slow this?
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
Post a full set of test results. We have seen some cases where the CYA had a large drop over the winter, this was also often combined with very high CC readings.

slightly TA is very low priority ... get everything else fixed and then you can work to lower the TA if you want ... or just maintain the pH and the TA will take care of itself.

borates are completely optional, but one benefit is that they may help slow the pH rise ... of course you have to get the TA lowered before considering adding them.
 

Richard320

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 6, 2010
23,544
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
IL_WS said:
Thanks for your input. I now plan to test CYA tonight. I was under the impression that it didn't deteriorate over the winter (don't remember where I got that idea from).

Are you saying ignore TA totally, or just here at startup? From last year's experience, I did see PH continually rise, so I expect a slow decrease of TA due to addition of muratic acid.

Related to PH rise, would borates help stabilize or slow this?
CYA doesn't evaporate. That's probably what you're thinking of.

But it can get lost either by a lot of rain, or snow pushing down on a cover and forcing it out, or sometimes some bacteria converts it to ammonia over the winter. If someone could isolate that stuff and bottle it up, they'd be a millionaire.

TA is the last thing to mess with, when everything else is stable and balanced and you're bored. Don't even think about borates yet. If you add them you'll have a much harder time lowering TA afterwards.
 

IL_WS

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2012
125
IL, NW of Chicago
Retested everything with TF100 kit:
FC = 8.0
CC = 0.5
PH = 7.8
CYA ~ 42 (much closer to 40 than to 50)
TA = 170
CH = 60

When I previously tested TA, I didn't wipe the tip of the additive between drops as instructed. I am guessing that is why the results are so different. I guess it makes sense that it is improtantant since it is the only step of all that specifies it.

As expected, the FC is high and still decreasing after being increased to shock level. I will test again first thing in the morning for overnight change.

Next-day dawn gave FC = 8.5, CC = 0