I think we bought a problem.

ejaisonl

New member
Mar 28, 2021
3
Garden CIty,Mi.
My wife and I purchased a house with an inground gunite pool which had been "professionally closed" by the seller who was an investor, not a resident. The home warranty they offered had pool coverage, but I was an idiot and didn't realize the warranty only covers the filter and pump. When we uncovered the pool last week we thought that the concrete around the pool was sinking and were going to call in a contractor to replace it. We drained the pool 2 days ago to prep it for a few repairs and a coat of paint. We woke up this morning to a bunch of new broken concrete and what appears to be a popped pool. Has anyone dealt with this before and is there any solution except tearing the pool out?
 

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Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Welcome to TFP! :wave: That is very unfortunate. :( A main reason we almost never recommend emptying a pool completely, especially in the wet season when the water tables are higher. At this point, it may be a total loss. Not sure if there are any salvable options, but we have some industry experts on teh forum who will confirm, so stand by.
 

ejaisonl

New member
Mar 28, 2021
3
Garden CIty,Mi.
Welcome to TFP! :wave: That is very unfortunate. :( A main reason we almost never recommend emptying a pool completely, especially in the wet season when the water tables are higher. At this point, it may be a total loss. Not sure if there are any salvable options, but we have some industry experts on teh forum who will confirm, so stand by.
I was thinking to get it painted before the real rain started, but I didnt think about the water table being high from snow melt. I am kicking myself. I am trying to console myself with the thought that it was probably already partially popped before i drained it. I just made it worse.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
24,000
I think that the seller knew it was floated.

That's why there is new concrete in spots.

Check with some contractors to see if there's anything you can do.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
24,000

Just saying.
 

ejaisonl

New member
Mar 28, 2021
3
Garden CIty,Mi.

Just saying.
I am hoping that we can get away with replacing concrete, but if the pool is floated and the ground water goes down, i am assuming there will be an empty cavity under the pool which would soon be full of broken gunite and water if I fill the pool.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
24,000
It's a bad situation. The pool might lift more or sink.

If you can get some well points around the pool to lower ground water and then refill the pool, you can see if it will sink.

Then, plan to replace the deck, coping, plaster, tile, plumbing and skimmers.

Most likely, your best option is to demo and rebuild or get rid of the pool.

It's going to be unstable as it is.


A rebuild would need to include a ground water management system.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
3,523
Morris Cnty NJ
Its popped but not that bad. Not gonna be cheap tho. You have 2 choices. You can either drill the shell and use a lifting company to level the shell amd stabilize the hollow side and then do a new deck to that height. You can also grout the void under pool then cut the pool to become level amd that is hidden with tile amd coping. The bad part is usually plumbing gets destroyed when pools pop. This gets expensive quick. For future any concrete pool needs the hydrostatic plug removed for draining amd should be done in the summer or fall. Sorry this happened to you
 
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