I know it's really early but when to open?

John85

Active member
Jun 4, 2016
38
Saint Louis, MO
Already thinking about opening for this spring. Last summer was my first with this pool (newly purchased house), and by the July thanks to a lot of reading on here I really had things figured out. Since we moved in May, we really didn't get the pool going until late May/June but given that it has full sun, I don't see a reason why I couldn't (necessarily) open in late-April/early-May for St. Louis, MO.

When do other folks open around here?
 

Divin Dave

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 2, 2013
5,220
Longview, Texas
I would say when the water temp gets about 50F. It will be easy to clean and shouldn't need slamming (unless it needed it when you closed).
The cooler water will give you a bit of breathing room in case you need a bit of time to get it up to speed.

A lot of people dont like to open so early because of the springtime pollen and windborne seeds that get in the water.
 

kywildcats

Bronze Supporter
Jul 23, 2015
620
Mayfield, KY
I am about 4 hours south of you in Western Kentucky. I opened March 12th last year. That may have a little early, but I wont miss that date by far again this year.
 

ssgumby

LifeTime Supporter
Feb 17, 2012
403
Maryland
I'm in MD and usually open late March. This year if time permits im opening in about a week. Water temp is at 48.
 

Perpetual summer

Silver Supporter
Feb 17, 2017
279
Ohio
Would that be a general rule, it water temp gets upward of 55 deg it would be safer to open before alge can start. This is my first opening so clueless about when.
 

Patrick_B

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 7, 2011
14,999
Midland TX
You need to factor in weather. Probably ok now, but don't ever open when there is risk of a hard freeze in the future. And oh yes, water temps in the 50s Algae growth will be slow if at all. Higher 50s still not that risky, but keep at least minimal FC Levels in place, because soon enough growth will start with a little temp increase.
 

camueller

Well-known member
May 11, 2016
488
Troy IL
Hi John. I'm across the river over in Troy IL so I can give you my advice, even though I've only owned my pool 2 winters.

So, it's March, and things have been very warm around here. But I still think we may see a freeze this month. My water temp is still in the low 50's, which is plenty cold to keep algae at bay, so I think I'm going to wait a little bit longer until I get my pool back up and fully running. However, your post has me thinking about just going for it.

Let me explain. I only partially closed my pool this year. I didn't cover it, all I did was winterize my pipes and pump/filter. I am tempted to get my pump back up and running so I can do a good vacuum and clean the floor up, as I've just been using a pole and net to dip leaves and large stuff out all winter. However, if I do, I will be paying very close attention to the weather forecasts and keeping my pump running if it gets below freezing again.

But I am confident in saying we are out of the season where we might find ourselves in a cold snap where the high doesn't get above 20 for several days. That's the kind of cold you need to really cause you plumbing problems. If all we get is a light freeze this month (which is probable) then it won't be hard to keep your pool safe. But you will still have to pay attention.

You'd be fine waiting a few weeks too though. I'll start feeling like I really need to get the pool "opened" when the water gets up into the 60's.
 

Tfaff

Well-known member
Jan 18, 2016
94
Wichita, Kansas
I've been wondering the same thing, my first spring opening too. We have an above ground pool, it looks messy with the cover on it all sagging, with leaves on top. It's been very warm and sunny, haven't checked the water temp yet but our winter cover is black, so I think that will be heating things up as well.

But then I think about the chemicals I'd be putting into it and the electricity, so don't want to jump the gun too early. I would welcome any other thoughts on opening time.
 

domct203

Bronze Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 3, 2015
3,959
CT
I've been wondering the same thing, my first spring opening too. We have an above ground pool, it looks messy with the cover on it all sagging, with leaves on top. It's been very warm and sunny, haven't checked the water temp yet but our winter cover is black, so I think that will be heating things up as well.

But then I think about the chemicals I'd be putting into it and the electricity, so don't want to jump the gun too early. I would welcome any other thoughts on opening time.
Open your pool before the water reaches 60 degrees, and the spring weather has settled. If you let the water get too warm and algae grows, it will consume any 'savings' of not opening a few weeks earlier when you have to SLAM.

Lots of good info here too.

https://www.troublefreepool.com/forums/13-Swimming-Pool-Start-up-and-Closing
 

Jeff Lebowski

Well-known member
May 29, 2014
62
Virginia Beach
I live in Virginia Beach and I opened last week.

Reason -

Last spring I spent a TON of time and energy getting my filthy pool clean. Even though I opened it fairly early, it took me forever to get it clean as a thick film of crud needed to be scraped off the liner. It was a pain. I decided that there had to be a better way.

So last fall, even though the temps were too cool for swimming, I left the filter running. I backed off the duration to about 4 hours per day. What did that cost me? 50 cents per day? Then when the water got too cold for salt-chlor, I put a chlorine puck in the skimmer and ran it another week or three. I finally drained a foot of water out, cleaned the filter and covered it. This was probably in early November. Then, on two occasions this winter I added 2 gallons of bleach. Once I added a small puck to each end of the pool (on the white plastic step).

I took the cover off the last day of Feb and found perfectly clean water, no algae and only needed to skim out the pine needles that snuck under the cover. EASY. I added some pucks since the water is too cold for the salt chlorinator to function.

So, this is my new routine (unless someone tells me that I am really dicking things up by using this method). EASY. Plus, I hate looking at the cover. Even though its too cold to swim, I love seeing that gorgeous blue pool as opposed to the cover.
 

ssgumby

LifeTime Supporter
Feb 17, 2012
403
Maryland
I live in Virginia Beach and I opened last week.

Reason -

Last spring I spent a TON of time and energy getting my filthy pool clean. Even though I opened it fairly early, it took me forever to get it clean as a thick film of crud needed to be scraped off the liner. It was a pain. I decided that there had to be a better way.

So last fall, even though the temps were too cool for swimming, I left the filter running. I backed off the duration to about 4 hours per day. What did that cost me? 50 cents per day? Then when the water got too cold for salt-chlor, I put a chlorine puck in the skimmer and ran it another week or three. I finally drained a foot of water out, cleaned the filter and covered it. This was probably in early November. Then, on two occasions this winter I added 2 gallons of bleach. Once I added a small puck to each end of the pool (on the white plastic step).

I took the cover off the last day of Feb and found perfectly clean water, no algae and only needed to skim out the pine needles that snuck under the cover. EASY. I added some pucks since the water is too cold for the salt chlorinator to function.

So, this is my new routine (unless someone tells me that I am really dicking things up by using this method). EASY. Plus, I hate looking at the cover. Even though its too cold to swim, I love seeing that gorgeous blue pool as opposed to the cover.
I do similar timing, I close late, usually in November and then open early, so far no later than late March. Its all a factor of temp for me, when it hits 50 I close, when it hits 50 I open. I do not add anything extra in fall, I mean I do not add a puck or any chlorine. When I open I put a few bottles of bleach in occasionally to keep FC up until i can get salt cell running. This method has always generated crystal clear water.
 

Sfpat

Silver Supporter
Jul 29, 2016
116
tulsa
I'm in Tulsa and opened my pool today. Water temp 58 F. I too did not cover the pool but spent the winter digging leaves. Did a through vacuum today, adjusted the ph (from off scale to 7.3), and raised the FC to 4 ppm (CYA @40). Kreepy Krawler is running. Water is clear but has a light greenish hue to it. I may do a slam next weekend if it doesn't blue up.
My goal this year is to get a robot as I believe I can keep the pool crystal clear through the winter with one and techniques learned on this site.
 

Sfpat

Silver Supporter
Jul 29, 2016
116
tulsa
Decided on Sunday to raise the FC to shock level. Three days of running the pump/filter and my water is now crystal clear, ready for swimming (well, maybe for the grandkids, needs to be a few degrees warmer for me).
 

pabeader

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
May 14, 2015
4,349
Cartersville Ga
I live in Virginia Beach and I opened last week.

Reason -

Last spring I spent a TON of time and energy getting my filthy pool clean. Even though I opened it fairly early, it took me forever to get it clean as a thick film of crud needed to be scraped off the liner. It was a pain. I decided that there had to be a better way.

So last fall, even though the temps were too cool for swimming, I left the filter running. I backed off the duration to about 4 hours per day. What did that cost me? 50 cents per day? Then when the water got too cold for salt-chlor, I put a chlorine puck in the skimmer and ran it another week or three. I finally drained a foot of water out, cleaned the filter and covered it. This was probably in early November. Then, on two occasions this winter I added 2 gallons of bleach. Once I added a small puck to each end of the pool (on the white plastic step).

I took the cover off the last day of Feb and found perfectly clean water, no algae and only needed to skim out the pine needles that snuck under the cover. EASY. I added some pucks since the water is too cold for the salt chlorinator to function.

So, this is my new routine (unless someone tells me that I am really dicking things up by using this method). EASY. Plus, I hate looking at the cover. Even though its too cold to swim, I love seeing that gorgeous blue pool as opposed to the cover.
The only thing that concerns me is the use of pucks. Since it was only a few, it shouldn't have made the CYA rise too high. I would check it just to be sure.
 

lmnconn

Active member
May 3, 2014
44
Missouri
I am also in the St. Louis area. This will be our 5th year of opening our pool. Generally, we open when the water is around 58-59 degrees. (Close when it drops just below 60 degrees also). Usually our weather is steady enough in mid to late April to hold water temps just below 60. We have never covered our pool and it has always been clear, year round. We do have plenty of leaves to dig out periodically, but that's not a big deal compared to dealing with a cover and the surprise you might find when you do uncover. I know we've had some warm weather and I have the bug to open the pool too, but it's still a little early. March is already proving to be colder than our February was.
 

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