I hate my pool.

jnahman

New member
Nov 17, 2017
2
Topanga CA
So I could have placed this under algae, chemicals, etc. Here is my issue. I had a horrible algae attack. After weeks of shocking, algae treatments, backflushing daily, cleaning the filter elements, it is finally relatively cleared. My problem is that while I have sufficient or more than sufficient chlorine, my CYA is high. I have drained a fair amount of water, which lowered the CYA bur it is still above 100. Living in California, I am concerned about water waste but it appears I will need to drain more.

So here is the question (comments on anything above are welcomed): I don't want to use tablets and keep adding stabilizers etc, which will raise the CYA again. When we moved into the house, there was a liquid chlorine unit but it was removed by our pool guy at the time.
Am I better off trying to get a liquid chlorinator feeder working again, go to salt (what is the downside of that?), or just try to battle the CYA issue now and again, in the future? Oh, I am the new pool guy.

Thank you forum members.
 
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tim5055

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 11, 2014
10,316
Franklin, NC
Your first issue will be to deal with teh CYA as to clear your pool you need to SLAM your pool. To do the SLAM you will need your own accurate test kit. Order a TF-100 Test Kit ™ and at least include the XL Option . That will give you what you need while you are clearing the pool, and probably enough reagents for a couple of years normal use.

For the long run, I would suggest going with a salt system (no real downside) as it is the most user friendly. I actually had a liquid chlorine pump (Stenner) and was very happy so without too much trouble you could go that way also. The downside to liquid is hauling all the bottles all the time. I just got into the habit of picking up a couple of bottles everytime I was out and about and kept my tank topped off.

While you wait for it to get delivered, you have a homework reading assignment. Start with these:




Please understand that the SLAM we use is a process, not a one time addition of chlorine. Here are teh insturctions:


So, welcome to TFP!!
 

jimbethesda

Gold Supporter
Jul 2, 2018
204
Austin, TX
What does “while I have sufficient or more than sufficient chlorine” mean? What are your full test results, and how are you testing it?
 

frogabog

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2010
2,834
Portland, Oregon
Yes, you do need to drain at least 50% of your water to get the CYA down. It sounds like you've got pool store tests. CYA testing at or above 100ppm is suspect. Once you drain 50% and refill, then hopefully you'll have your test kit and can do your CYA test yourself. You'll know if you need to drain more after that.

You're going to continue to hate your pool with 100ppm CYA. It's going to cost quite a bit in chlorine to keep it maintained, much less be able to get ahead of the algae with the SLAM Process. The kit will save you $, promise.

If you can get your liquid chlorinator back online, after you're done SLAMming you can use it for maintenance. It's worth a try if you want to save up for a SWG in the meantime and can sort out how to put it back online yourself. I'm sure we have people here who can help you with that. It's not for SLAM though, you'll have to lug about some chlorine to do that.

Your first step is to drain and refill. I'm going to defer to someone else who will hopefully chime in about how much chlorine to add while you're doing this and waiting for your test kit. TFTestkits ships lickity split so get that on order right away!
 
I’m sorry that you’re hating your pool at the moment. That’s not a fun place to be.

It sounds like you are a good candidate for a SWCG. It does reduce the need for lugging jugs of chlorinating liquid, but only after you’ve completed the SLAM process mentioned above.

When we bought our house with pool, we had pretty high CYA, about 80 if I recall. We also regularly have pretty severe water restrictions, and draining wasn’t an option. I was able to SLAM to remove algae that fall (and the next spring we started using a SWCG). CYA over 100 might just be too high, though. A few partial drains might get you down to 80 or 70 where you can manage a SLAM, though it will require lots of jugs of chlorinating liquid, and then your CYA would also be the recommended level for a SWCG.

Do you have a good test kit? That’s definitely the best initial investment for being your own pool care person. I really love understanding what’s going on with my water and being able to manage it without unnecessary water waste.
 

TomGallopavo

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2016
242
Hillbillyville, MO
I can’t tell you how much we love our pool. I’m only here to tell you to follow the advice you are getting and will continue to get. We use a swg and a bot to clean the pool. We do almost nothing and spend almost nothing (I’m at a c note this year for chemicals). We swim almost everyday and the water is the best we have ever been in and anyone who comes over can’t believe how nice it is. Follow along and a year from now you will laugh at how depressed and frustrated you were...
 

AimeeH

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Apr 2, 2012
2,028
Columbia SC
I'd like to chime in as say with a little bit of learning in pool school, you can learn to love your pool. I am also a SWG user/owner and I can't think of much of any downside. We can go on vacation for 1-2 weeks and not have to worry about chlorinating since the SWG runs when the pump runs. I know the SWG will chlorinate for a finite number of hours so there will be replacement cost on my horizon but I know and am planning on it. So lifetime cost may not beat liquid chlorine cost but it save hauling and storing liquid chlorine.
 
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Msch99

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Jun 11, 2018
376
Verona, MO
If you can swing a swg, you dont need to exchange as much water. Get down to 80 or so and you are good.
Love my TF100 test kit and speed stir. Cheaper than popping $ at the pool store reacting to issues instead of preventing them in the first place!
 
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Msch99

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Jun 11, 2018
376
Verona, MO
The problem he has is that there is algae present. Trying to SLAM at high CYA levels is very difficult.
Yup, I know, I have swg. I believe he mentioned some possible water exchange issues so swg with higher cya is another factor to think about.😁
 

jnahman

New member
Nov 17, 2017
2
Topanga CA
Thank you for your responses. I will follow up on them. I did see one thing on the web that stated that with a SWG you have to drain and scrub your pool yearly. I am assuming that it may be a rare situation since no other reviews mentioned this. Any input on this and which SWG might be the best (and least hassle) to have?
 

tim5055

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 11, 2014
10,316
Franklin, NC
Thank you for your responses. I will follow up on them. I did see one thing on the web that stated that with a SWG you have to drain and scrub your pool yearly. I am assuming that it may be a rare situation since no other reviews mentioned this.
Not rare, non-existant.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
8,992
Northern NJ
Any input on this and which SWG might be the best (and least hassle) to have?
All SWGs use the same chemical process. Read


How many gallons in your pool? We recommend a SWG with at least 2X the capacity of your pool.

You going to install it yourself or have it professionally installed? It affects the warranty situation with different manufacturers.
 

Saturn94

Well-known member
Mar 11, 2015
680
Virginia
Thank you for your responses. I will follow up on them. I did see one thing on the web that stated that with a SWG you have to drain and scrub your pool yearly. I am assuming that it may be a rare situation since no other reviews mentioned this. Any input on this and which SWG might be the best (and least hassle) to have?

That’s completely bogus. Our pool was installed in March 2004, including a SWCG, and we’ve NEVER had to drain and scrub down the pool!
 

an1vrsy

Bronze Supporter
Jul 10, 2018
137
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Another option that wouldn't require a drain and refill is reverse osmosis. You can do an internet search and find local companies that could service your pool. Reverse osmosis will be more expensive than a drain and refill even with our CA water rates but it is something to think about.
 

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