How to clear up my water

Recap21

New member
Jul 17, 2019
3
Fort Worth, Tx
I’m a first time owner of an above ground pool, it’s an 18’ Coleman, about 6,000 gallons. I filled it up with water from the hose and put 1 chlorine tablet in a floater. After the first 2 weeks (and a lot of rain, although I had it covered) the pool turned green and gross...I went to pool store to ask what to do...they had me bring them a water sample and gave me a bunch of stuff to put in it...they weren’t overly priced I don’t think. Spent $25 total on shock, chlorine tabs, clarifier and something else. This was 2 days ago and the pump has been running 24/7, the pool is now no longer green but is a cloudy, milky blue. Took another water sample back to pool store and they said that the water was perfectly balanced and the problem is with my pump (which is just the one that the pool came with). If this is true is there anything else I can do to clear up the water? I’m half tempted just to drain it and start over. What should I do? What would be easiest and cheapest?

Also is it safe to swim in even though I can’t see the bottom of the pool?

Thank you so much for the help.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Welcome to the forum! :wave: It is true that those Colman/Intext type pools come with limited filtration abilities, but that may not be the true problem. A green/cloudy pool tends to point towards algae which clarifiers, floc, and other pool store gimmicks won't kill. To remove algae you need to follow the SLAM Process. Make note it's a process and not a one-time shock as you might hear at the store. In addition, you need a TF-100 (or Taylor K-2006C) test kit to do the SLAM.

When pools are about 3K in size, we do recommend a dump, clean and start over process. Yours is over that, so depending on available time and cost of water, it's totally up to you how you wish to proceed. But even if you dump and start over, you'll need the TF-100 to keep water balanced and from green happening again. Pool store testing is often flawed.

Let us know if you have any questions.

Also see:
ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry
Test Kits Compared
 

Recap21

New member
Jul 17, 2019
3
Fort Worth, Tx
Welcome to the forum! :wave: It is true that those Colman/Intext type pools come with limited filtration abilities, but that may not be the true problem. A green/cloudy pool tends to point towards algae which clarifiers, floc, and other pool store gimmicks won't kill. To remove algae you need to follow the SLAM Process. Make note it's a process and not a one-time shock as you might hear at the store. In addition, you need a TF-100 (or Taylor K-2006C) test kit to do the SLAM.

When pools are about 3K in size, we do recommend a dump, clean and start over process. Yours is over that, so depending on available time and cost of water, it's totally up to you how you wish to proceed. But even if you dump and start over, you'll need the TF-100 to keep water balanced and from green happening again. Pool store testing is often flawed.

Let us know if you have any questions.

Also see:
ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry
Test Kits Compared

Is it still safe to swim in? Just bc it’s cloudy? I mean it can’t be worse than the lake right?
 

LoneWolfArcher

Well-known member
May 29, 2019
258
Michigan
The shock they had you add likely killed the algae. It is now up to your filter to filter out. What kind of filter are you using? Clarifier is like glue. So it is possible that part of the problem is a gummed up filter. I am on a cartridge filer and I didn't get my blue cloudy water clear until I got a new filter cartridge. If you are sand you may want to backflush a lot. Anytime your pressure gains goes 25% higher than clean pressure. (IE, if clean pressure is 10psi, then when it hits 12.5 psi, flush it). If you have a cartridge I would highly recommend a replacement after using clarifier. DE is the filter I know least about so I will leave it to others to advise you if you have a DE filter.