How many amps do I need

Hank2000

Bronze Supporter
Jun 26, 2018
81
Louisville ms
I am running new service to my pool. I have a single speed pump runs off of 110. Would like to maybe go to a 220 pump someday. Maybe an injection pump or SWG at some point a few lights (2 or 3 ) on my deck and maybe a light in my pool. What would you do
 

setsailsoon

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Oct 25, 2015
1,274
Stuart/FL
Hank,

Depends a lot on your future loads. If it were me, I'd add up the potential simultaneous loads and add a contingency of 30%. Make sure you have it installed to comply with NEC code requirements. If you're not familiar with this get a licensed electrician to do the work.

Chris
 

Hank2000

Bronze Supporter
Jun 26, 2018
81
Louisville ms
Thanks for the reply. I am familiar with it and I would not do it any other way. I do all my own work around here and I keep up with codes when ever I do this kind of work. Good thing is I live in the country on a farm so no inspection. But it will be done right or not at all
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
13,628
Bedford, TX
Hank,

Based upon the requirements in your post, I would run a 30 amp, 4 wire, 240 volt line... Keep in mind that the ground wire has to be green and can not be the standard bare wire. This will allow you to have 120 and 240 at the pad.. I would have a small sub-panel at the pad for local circuit breakers.

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

Hank2000

Bronze Supporter
Jun 26, 2018
81
Louisville ms
That’s what I was thinking but wanted to make sure my electricity at the pad was never done right the PB had it done as part of the deal. Things like when I went to install deck lights and bond them no binding wire so I’m bonding the pool today. Only have 15 amps 110 at the pad. So I have to run new lines to the pad. But it’s a long run so that part will be down the road a month or so.
 

Richard320

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 6, 2010
22,059
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
Go big. Put a subpanel out there.

For now, you're thinking pump, SWG, a few lights. But what about a robot? Or maybe you'll do some landscaping and want to plug a weedwhacker or a lawnmower in while the pump is running. Some electric bugzappers. An electric rotisserie for the grill. There's no way to predict what new toys are just over the horizon. Who'd have thunk we'd have so many devices and their chargers only twenty years ago? Just look at all the 12V and USB ports there are in new cars!

Whatever you can safely feed off your main panel is what I would go for.
 

CJadamec

TFP Expert
Apr 29, 2016
2,390
Quaker Hill, CT
I'm with Richard on this one. If you are running power it's easy enough to run more than you need now than trying to redo it later.

As was mentioned the proper way to do it that meets code is a 4 wire THHN/W run in conduit. For ease of use and keeping further additions clean a small subpanel is the way to go.

If you can afford #6 wire that will get you 40-60 amps depending on how far of a run it is. NEC allows you to make the ground wire a #8 in a run like this. Also as was mentioned the ground wire must be insulated green. Direct burial cable is not acceptable for pools because it's ground wire is not insulated.

There have been a number of times where I have tapped into my pool panel for power out in the yard. Including a few welding projects.
 

Hank2000

Bronze Supporter
Jun 26, 2018
81
Louisville ms
I can feed what ever off my main panel it’s 200 amps only using 40 It’s my shop panel but from shop to pool is over 300 foot. So that will dictate what size wire I can run because of cost. I’m thinking #4 for 40 amps and I may use aluminum because of cost and did plain on 220 with a sup panel at the pad. If I decide to move the pad 100 feet from the pool that will help on wire cost Pipe is cheaper then wire. But I’m not sure it’s worth moving it that far from the pool. Will it will be about 120 feet away where I would want to move it to.
 

CJadamec

TFP Expert
Apr 29, 2016
2,390
Quaker Hill, CT
#4 aluminum should be ok for 40amps intermittent and 30 amps continuous at 300 feet. It is roughly half the price of a #6 copper run.

If you bring the pump closer to the building to around a 200 foot wire run you could handle closer to 50-60amps intermittent and 40 amps continuous on #4 aluminum.

Don't forget to treat the bare ends of the aluminum wire with no-ox compound before putting them in the terminal lugs.
 

Hank2000

Bronze Supporter
Jun 26, 2018
81
Louisville ms
Ok have thought about that. I did get my bonding done today. Kinda PO’s me I paid someone to do that and they didn’t and I found it out by accident so thankful no got hurt because of it thanks for all y’all help
 
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