How long can the pool stay empty

Feb 21, 2016
7
Mesa, AZ
#1
We need to drain the pool and refil due to chemicals building up, and needing to use more and more chlorine to keep up. While it is empty we would like to re-grout the tile around the top.
1. How long can we safely stay empty in Phoenix, AZ?
2. Is there a certain kind of grout to use?
3. Is there a certain way we should clean or brush the sides and bottom while empty?
Thanks in advance!!
 

gwegan

TFP Expert
Apr 19, 2013
2,769
Sacramento, CA
#2
This a 22000 gallon fiberglass pool?

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Generally you don't want to empty any in ground pool.

The best way to replace water is with a series of partial drains. It takes more water Ok a lot more water but the pool does not pop and in the case of plaster the plaster the plaster does not dry out.

Tou can replace the title in a fiberglass pool without totally draining.

First you determine where the water table is.
 

EBD

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2017
54
Gilbert
#3
I am in AZ as well and although I am not expert, I believe its getting to warm to drain the pool. If you really want to drain it, you would be better off waiting until winter time November to Feb. This is why you see the Acid wash signs everywhere during that time. I went through this once to do an acid wash myself and was advised not to do it as it was too hot when I went to buy the acid. The pool was already draining and was too late to back out so I was instructed to keep the walls wet and hose them down every half hour or so to prevent heat from cracking the walls of the pool :(. Everything went well but it was a bit stressful to work against heat and sun and time.
 

GaryT58

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TFP Guide
Jul 26, 2016
571
Monroe, GA
#4
+1 to gwegan. If fiberglass, should never really fully empty as it lift/pop out. The water weight is keeping it in the ground. Not sure its official name, but we have a long covered tube next to pool which we could lower a pump to try and drain the ground water first before attempting a full drain, but that would need to be done by pool builder, or it would void our warranty.

Another option is to find a pool osmosis company. They bring a large scale reverse osmosis filtering system which will take out the chemicals and recycle your water. Can be less expensive, from my understand, than swapping out the water in certain locations with high water costs.
 
OP
OP
I
Feb 21, 2016
7
Mesa, AZ
#5
It is, I believe, a 1978 plaster pool which has had some kind repairs made to it, and a gel coat done over the plaster. Everything I have read says we need to replace at least 67% of the water to get chemicals back in line.
I was not aware of heat being an issue, tho. The city website recommended we wait until April to lessen the impact to our water bill, and since my husband had surgery earlier in the spring, that worked for his health as well.
 

pooldv

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Aug 10, 2012
24,993
DFW, TX
#6
Heat is only a factor with plaster and when temps are well above 90. The plaster dries out, shrinks and cracks. A quick drain of 2/3s of the water would be fine in any case.
 
OP
OP
I
Feb 21, 2016
7
Mesa, AZ
#7
Update: The water level got just below the top step overnight. And whatever the coating is over the plaster started to crack like mud in the desert! Arg!!
Refilling.
We will have to drain and add simultaneously, I suppose.
Any ideas how to repair? IMG_0934.jpg
 

pooldv

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
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Aug 10, 2012
24,993
DFW, TX
#8
That looks like paint or epoxy, not gelcoat. Normally, gelcoat is used to finish fiberglass, pools or boats. It wouldn't typically be applied to plaster. Although, I've seen people do many non-typical things to pool surfaces. :)

If that is paint or epoxy then it needs to be removed. We do not recommend painting pools because it only lasts 2 or 3 years and then it makes a big mess and is often difficult to work with. It is probably best to chip out the old plaster and replaster the pool.