High CC, doesnt seem to want to drop

Wolfmarsh

Well-known member
Jun 19, 2007
151
0
Charleston, SC
#1
I did some searching and read the posts that came up, but wanted to ask anyhow. I got my Taylor K-2006 the other day and my CC read 0.6, so I went to shock.

My readings last night were:

FC 3.6
CC 0.6
PH 7.4
TA 100
CH 120
CYA 45

I put in enough bleach to bring the chlorine to 20ppm, which I thought would be more than enough to take care of the CC problem.

Tonight i took the following measurements:

FC 6.4
CC 0.8
PH 7.4
TA 100
CH 120
CYA 45

How is it possible that after shocking, my CC went up? I went ahead and put enough bleach in to bring the FC up to 20ppm again tonight, hoping that I can kill whatever is causing it to happen.

Am I on the right track?
 

chem geek

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Expert
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
2
San Rafael, CA USA
#2
The CC can go up if there are additional organics in the pool that chlorine can combine with. If this happens at a faster rate than they get broken down by additional chlorine and sunlight, then the CC can climb. At some point after combining with all available organics, it should stop climbing and should come down. In some cases it won't come down below a certain point, but that is rare in outdoor pools (it would be from "persistent" combined chlorine that doesn't break down readily).
 

eelhc

Active member
May 30, 2007
39
0
#3
I had this problem a while back...

Went through ~$100 in Bleach shocking at night and testing in the morning. I would shock to 15PPM FC at night and in the AM I would be back down to 0PPM FC. Whatever was living in the pool was reproducing at about the rate I was killing them off.

But I was just starting out back then. I have learned that testing often (every couple of hours) and maintaining shock levels until there's 0 CC does the trick (usually no more than a day or two). I consume much less bleach this way. When there's something living in your pool... brute force is the best approach.

Now I pretty much maintain 0 CC all the time. If for some reason I get even a trace of CC, shock, test often and maintain shock FC levels until I'm back to 0 CC.
 

duraleigh

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Apr 1, 2007
31,263
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Sebring, Florida
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#4
Re: I had this problem a while back...

eelhc's experience is an excellent example of what it takes to clear a pool.....CONSISTENT levels of high chlorine until the tests indicate success and pool water looks good.

Time and time again, newbies toss in one big dose of Cl which is quickly consumed leaving the Cl level too low to kill the rest of the organics or even provide adequate sanitation levels. The pool then quickly returns to it's original condition.....a haven for algae to bloom

If you have problematic pool water, keep your chlorine AT SHOCK LEVEL CONTINUOSLY until the water tests and looks good.

Don't try to tiptoe up on your pool water........kick it straight in the butt with chlorine and keep kicking it until it looks and tests the way you want.

PS - please don't misinterpret "newbies" as demeaning........There's not one of us on this forum who hasn't been, at some point, a newbie to pools and their proper care.
 

Wolfmarsh

Well-known member
Jun 19, 2007
151
0
Charleston, SC
#5
Thanks for the posts!

I dont take noob as demeaning at all :) I am one!

Hey duraleigh, I am from Raleigh, used to live off of durant/brassfield. Then i lived in Cary off cary parkway for a couple years.

I come up every month or so to visit my in-laws who now live off glenwood in some new townhomes near what used to be CompUSA.

Just a unrelated side note :)
 

duraleigh

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Sebring, Florida
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#6
I've been here since '71.....what a consistant boom town. I moved on the North side of Falls Lake 15 years ago to escape the traffic. Aside from unbearable (to me) hot SE US Summers, it's a great place to live and prosper.