Help: Pool deck causing moisture issues in house

poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
I think that the pool probably floated before the sale of the house and then everything was redone to to make it look as normal as possible.
The deck, pool, spa were all built together in the early 2000s. In fact the previous owner's three children left little footprints and the date (2001) on a corner of the deck when they poured the concrete.
 
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poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
Here's another picture. It's a beautiful pool and deck. It's a shame the builder didn't grade it property.

I appreciate everyone's responses so far. Will keep you all posted after the channel drain is installed.
 

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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,681
In fact the previous owner's three children left little footprints and the date (2001) on a corner of the deck when they poured the concrete.
That was a genius strategy to make you think that the new deck was original so that you would not know that the pool floated and needed a new deck.

:p

Seriously, maybe they put the pool up high due to the high water table.

In any case, I think that you need water control from a professional expert.
 
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poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
That was a genius strategy to make you think that the new deck was original so that you would not know that the pool floated and needed a new deck.

:p

Seriously, maybe they put the pool up high due to the high water table.

In any case, I think that you need water control from a professional expert.
I know you're joking but I'm so cynical that I thought about that :) It would be brilliant. Some of the neighbors have been around since the house was built in 1995 and have vouched that the deck was there since the early 2000s.

We might have additional water control measures in the future if this channel drain isn't enough. The channel drain won't hurt and I need it done. I don't like the deck being right up against the foundation like that. I can see black water spots on the foundation in the small gap between the deck and the house. That can't be good.
 
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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
28,518
Northern NJ
Pool Size
35000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-60
Have you considered putting a waterproof membrane on the slab the next time the floors get water damaged and need replacement?

That is not a substitute for the drainage you are planning. But if the water level under the slab stays high and the slab is wicking moisture then you may need to remedy it inside.
 
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poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
Have you considered putting a waterproof membrane on the slab the next time the floors get water damaged and need replacement?

That is not a substitute for the drainage you are planning. But if the water level under the slab stays high and the slab is wicking moisture then you may need to remedy it inside.
I'm not even thinking about the floors right now. I will probably address that next year. But yes, we will definitely use a waterproof membrane.
 

poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
Maybe it leaks some into the ground.

Are you sure that the water actually makes it to the street?
You know, I've never actually tested it. I know water going down the patio drains makes it out to the street. I'll run a hose tomorrow through that overfill drain and see if water makes it out.

Edit: I tested the overfill drain and the water flowed out to the street just fine.
 
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A.O.

Well-known member
Apr 12, 2016
498
Kershaw, South Carolina
Surface
Fiberglass
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
I'll tell you how that happens. The genius who built the deck poured 3-4" of concrete on one side of the house and 0.5" to 1" on the other side.

I went with the channel drain. I emailed the drainage guy to move forward with it. Fingers crossed!
I think that is a good plan, make sure the patio/deck whatever you want to call it slopes downhill that short distance from the house to the drain.

My daughter and SIL also live in Houston and are having similar problems, contractors they've had out say people all over Houston are having the same thing due too all the rain you guys are having!!
 
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superuser

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2020
195
Spring, TX
You know, I've never actually tested it. I know water going down the patio drains makes it out to the street. I'll run a hose tomorrow through that overfill drain and see if water makes it out.
The house we bought a year ago had some drainage issues too that took me a minute to figure out. Thankfully they didn't build the deck up tight to the house, and the deck is level with the existing patio slab (~ 1.5 in. down from the door sill plate). I have a complement of eight interconnected drains; one downspout drain, one overflow in the pool, three in the deck between the house and pool, and three more in the beds between the deck and the house. With a big rain the pool wouldn't drain, the water would back flow into the flower beds and ultimately run off through the yard. Thankfully the landscaping is graded away from the house so no water intrusion issues. I searched for blockages and ultimately found the culprit - the popup valve at the street was completely overgrown. Took a while to even find it.
 

poolnovice1

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2018
95
Houston
The house we bought a year ago had some drainage issues too that took me a minute to figure out. Thankfully they didn't build the deck up tight to the house, and the deck is level with the existing patio slab (~ 1.5 in. down from the door sill plate). I have a complement of eight interconnected drains; one downspout drain, one overflow in the pool, three in the deck between the house and pool, and three more in the beds between the deck and the house. With a big rain the pool wouldn't drain, the water would back flow into the flower beds and ultimately run off through the yard. Thankfully the landscaping is graded away from the house so no water intrusion issues. I searched for blockages and ultimately found the culprit - the popup valve at the street was completely overgrown. Took a while to even find it.
That sounds like a lot of stuff for a popup valve. Our drains, overflow, and two downspouts go through a 4" PVC pipe that exits out to the curb, like so: Curb Drains | Under Sidewalk Drains | Drain Thru Curb We are going to put a popup also further up the yard to serve as a backup in case the street gets flooded and water can't get through the PVC pipe.
 

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superuser

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2020
195
Spring, TX
It's a 4 inch pipe, and I'm guessing they did the popup because they weren't allowed a curb cut, or didn't want to get the approval. When I uncovered it I think I snapped the stem that retains the poppet by hitting it with the shovel. Either way it was broke when I lifted the sod off of it. So I drilled it and installed a longer socket head cap screw to take the place of the retaining stem, and gave it a pretty good amount of travel. We haven't had any substantial storm events this past year to really test it, but so far it hasn't backed up in the rains we've had. It's at least threaded so if it backs up I can remove it, temporarily or otherwise.

Good luck with your deck work, I'm sure it'll be a pretty big relief to get that all resolved.
 
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nousername

Bronze Supporter
Sep 22, 2019
38
Phoenix, Arizona
A little late to the party with a random thought that would probably not work here but I have seen used in other areas.

You might be able to build a low thin brick planter up against the wall where it is leaking into the house. The inside of the planter would then be waterproofed. The the planter would keep the water away from reaching the house wall and seeping in. If it is coming in the door that is a problem.
 
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markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
3,508
Atlanta Ga
I had a similar issue when we had heavy rain. I had more area between the house and the pool and had them replace about a 10' wide section of concrete and slope it away form the house then back up so now the water running out and down our drive way. My issue was the small drains couldn't handle heavy rains
 
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