Heat Pump in Northern Climate

sevver

Well-known member
Mar 27, 2007
477
Morris, IL
My brother was interested in buying a heat pump, and he spoke with someone who told him that they are not worth the investment up here (chicago-land). Apparently they are more suitable to southern climates, does that seem to make sense?
 

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
9,471
SW Indiana
It's plenty warm during swimming season for a heat pump in Chicago. For summer temperature, Illinois and Indiana are hotter than the states south of them much of the time.
 

sevver

Well-known member
Mar 27, 2007
477
Morris, IL
Hmmm... I wonder why he was told that, I will have to get him on here to post about it. He is seriously interested in getting one, there is electric and gas out there already, he has a 200,000 BTU heater that cost him $2500 last year for 5 months of use. The gas company was kind enough to estimate his bill for 5 months, and then sock him that one to make up for it at the end. Then, they were gracious enough to tell him they wanted it, that the bill was due.
 

duraleigh

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Apr 1, 2007
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Sebring, Florida
Hi, guys,

Typically, heat pumps become pretty ineffective at low outside air temps....say, below 35 or so. For that reason, you seldom see them heating houses in the North. They fare better in the South for houses.

Of course, for pool heating, that would be a different situation. Most pools, Southern or Northern, are heated when the air temps are in a range where the heat pump can operate efficiently.
 

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
9,471
SW Indiana
duraleigh said:
Hi, guys,

Typically, heat pumps become pretty ineffective at low outside air temps....say, below 35 or so. For that reason, you seldom see them heating houses in the North. They fare better in the South for houses.

Of course, for pool heating, that would be a different situation. Most pools, Southern or Northern, are heated when the air temps are in a range where the heat pump can operate efficiently.
We have an air-to-air heat pump to heat and cool our home. It is pretty economical for heating in southern Indiana, and really good at cooling. We don't have nearly the winter that the northern end of the state gets. They are pretty common, and indistinguishable from a central air conditioner to the average person. We wanted a geothermal heat pump when we built, but I wasn't able to find an experienced contractor who could do the install when I needed it.

Pretty surprising to me that more efforts aren't made to market heat pumps or air conditioners with water heat exchangers to move the heat from the house to the pool water. Seems silly to pay to cool your house, then pay more to heat your pool.
 

sevver

Well-known member
Mar 27, 2007
477
Morris, IL
That topic came up pretty heavy last year I remember. I would imagine that it would be totally possible to do it. The Central Air unit pumps out some serious heat if you stand next to it, if it could be harnessed, sort of like the way a cooling lake works, it would be cool. 8)
 

kirbinster

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2007
293
NJ
Would be fine in your area for the pool, have had mine in Northern NJ for 8 years and it works great.
 

CarlD

Well-known member
Apr 8, 2007
104
Guess my post on the other version didn't make it over here....
And I was SOOOOO eloquent! :roll:
 

kirbinster

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2007
293
NJ
sevver said:
I was not aware that heat pumps were used to heat houses. That is interesting.
I had one when I lived in Delaware to heat and cool the house - worked very well, but that was over 20 years ago. At the time the power company gave you very cheap power in the winter if you used a heatpump to encourage their usage.
 
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