Hard Plumb/Pump Overheating

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,769
What is the filter pressure when the pump is on?

The filter is going to provide enough resistance to keep the pump from going into full runout.

I suspect that it's a combination of a power supply problem and probably a failing motor.

At the motor rated amperage, the wires are too small for the load and the distance.

Also, the connections are probably beginning to burn and oxidize.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,769
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If you look at just the filter, it provides enough head loss to prevent runout by itself.

Just accounting for the filter, you get 64 gpm at 36 feet of head loss.

If you add on the multiport and the plumbing, the head loss is even higher.

The multiport will provide probably 10 feet of head loss.

Even with zero TDH from the plumbing, the filter and multiport should prevent runout.

Note: The filter head loss chart might include the multiport head loss, but it is not clear if the multiport is included or not.

Note 2: The filter has 2.2 square feet of surface area. The flow should not exceed about 15 gpm per square foot, which is 33 gpm.

If you use 20 gpm per square foot, it's 44 gpm.

Anything over 44 gpm is really too much flow.

The flow provided by the pump is significantly more than the filter should get.

Going to a much smaller pump or a two speed pump or a variable speed pump would be a good idea.

It will allow the filter to work better and it will cut your energy costs by up to 90%.
 
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Sammypants

Member
Jun 17, 2020
13
Texas
What is the electrical supply?

Is the wiring in good condition end to end?

Does the motor sound different?
It’s a 110v. Wiring is all in good condition. Motor doesn’t sound any different to me. Just shutting off, I think because of overheating.

Unfortunately, I think I will need to replace the pump, but really can’t do a $800-1000 pump right now.
The pump is about 11 years old.

So, maybe it's failing.

It looks like the electrical is an extension cord?

If you are not comfortable working with electricity, get someone to run a good power supply to see if that helps.

If not, you probably need a new pump.

I would plan to switch over to 240 volts with a new power supply and a variable speed pump.

I would also move the equipment away from the pool by at least 5 feet to avoid getting water splashed on the equipment while kids are swimming.
Copy all. Thank you for the help. Yes it’s a heavy gauge, construction site extension while we have a trench done for running a dedicated line to that area.
 

Sammypants

Member
Jun 17, 2020
13
Texas
What is the filter pressure when the pump is on?

The filter is going to provide enough resistance to keep the pump from going into full runout.

I suspect that it's a combination of a power supply problem and probably a failing motor.

At the motor rated amperage, the wires are too small for the load and the distance.

Also, the connections are probably beginning to burn and oxidize.
Filter pressure runs about 12 normally after backwashing. New sand installed this year when we opened the pool.

We are trenching a new dedicated outlet to that area now.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,769
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If you want a single speed pump, I would suggest a SP2600X5 (115 volt).

If you want a two-speed, I would suggest a SP2607X102S (230 volt).
 

Sammypants

Member
Jun 17, 2020
13
Texas
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If you want a single speed pump, I would suggest a SP2600X5 (115 volt).

If you want a two-speed, I would suggest a SP2607X102S (230 volt).
Thank you!
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,769
Depending on the utility, you might qualify for a rebate on a variable speed pump.

Example:

A $300 rebate from Austin Energy

Participating Contractor Required for Rebate

Austin Energy requires that you use a participating contractor to install the variable speed pool pump to qualify for this rebate. Your participating contractor can help you choose the right equipment for your home.


Running at low speed continuously will give you the best water quality and the lowest energy cost.

It will also be the quietest option.

You can probably get enough flow at 1,500 rpm on a SuperFlo VS.

I would consider a SuperFlo VS.

The Hayward SP23520VSP would work.

 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
27,769
If you get the SP2600X5 Superpump, the flow will probably be about 40 gpm, which is higher than ideal, but still acceptable.

If you get the SP2607X102S, the flow on low will be about 25 gpm or about 50 gpm on high.

25 gpm would be a good flow and it would be more than enough.

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