Gym pool water

RoyalGorgeColorado

Bronze Supporter
Jun 10, 2020
22
Cañon City, CO
I hope this question(s) is allowed under this topic. My mother is a senior citizen and has a membership at a local gym. Since the gym has reopened they are using extra chlorine in the pool due to coronavirus. My mother said people have been complaining about it burning and the strong smell and it took two days to get the chlorine smell off her skin. Members have asked about it and the gym said it will be that way until this virus has passed. Wouldn't the normal amount of chlorine for that pool be enough?
 

Oly

Gold Supporter
Jun 28, 2017
1,656
Fresno, CA
You would be able to test the water with your TF100 kit if your mom just happened to have some pool water trapped in her fins or swim bag or water bottle when she gets home from the gym. :wink:
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
34,348
Sebring, Florida
The "gym" does not have it's act together. Completely irresponsible to over-chlorinate a pool. I doubt you will have much luck convincing the hard heads that their plan is based on ignorance........not science.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,696
The CC level is probably very high. Ask them for the actual FC and CC.

As a public pool, they have to keep records of the chemistry and they usually have to provide the logs on request to anyone who wants them.

It's probably not uncommon for the readings to be logged as good regardless of the actual readings. So, the records might not be much help, but it's worth asking.

A high use, indoor pool can't be successfully maintained with only chlorine. You have to use something else, like a professional, commercial quality ozone or UV system.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,696
They can't just increase the levels to whatever they want. They have to follow health department rules.

Ask to see the records and find out what the health department rules are to see if they are exceeding the levels specified for FC and CC.

You can even request a health department inspection. The health department will send an inspector with a test kit to check the chemistry and the records.

Maybe get a sample of the water so that you can test it yourself
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,696
All public pools or semi-public pools shall maintain a record of information regarding operations of the pool. Included within this record shall be, but not limited to, disinfectant levels, pH, calcium hardness levels, total alkalinity, flow meter readings, temperatures, pool balance calculations, SCBA or canister-type respirator checks, gas canister expiration dates, and maintenance procedures.

The record of the pool operations shall be kept at the facility and shall be available for inspection by anyone upon request.

Max fc =5.0. Max CC =1.0


Inspection reports might be available online as shown here.

 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
2,324
OV, CA
If you came waltzing in there with your TF100 I would imagine two responses..
-they would be entranced that you can do your own tests and be enthusiastic about your results
OR and more likely
-you would be waltzed right out on your toockus
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,696
You can ask to see their records and they have to show them to you.

An inspector can go in any time and check anything they want.

You can request an inspection and the health department should schedule one as soon as possible.
 
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JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,279
Tucson, AZ
The reference says that the minimum CYA is 20 ppm.

I don't think that it would be harsh to swim in 5 ppm with no CYA.
The problem is chloramine formation. When no (or low) CYA is present, the rate of formation of nitrogen trichloride relative to monochloramine or dichloramine is higher. This is what tends to make indoor public pools smell so bad. In an outdoor public pool it would be less noticeable if airflow is decent.

Either way, you are right. The records should be checked either by the individual or the public health dept.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
20,696
It's beneficial to add some CYA to help reduce nitrogen trichloride.

Some places don't allow CYA in indoor pools.

Assuming no CCs, swimming in 5 ppm with no CYA should not be particularly harsh.

In my opinion, trying to manage a high use indoor pool with only chlorine is a losing proposition

Without something to get rid of chloramines, the air and water will quickly become extremely unpleasant.

Adding plenty of fresh air can be helpful to keep the air quality acceptable, but that can be difficult if the outside air temperature is very high or low.
 
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