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Whiskeyfox

Well-known member
Jun 24, 2020
139
Houston, TX
Let's say this is for example a 500,000$ house without a pool. Now it's a 530,000-540,000$ or so house with a 37yr old working pool without problems, if the pool was new it would be worth more but the age is taken into consideration by buyers. Now what you have on the other hand is a 500,000$ house with a $20,000+ problem, actually making 99% of buyers steer clear, and making the house actually worth less than if it had no pool at all.

I think your best bet is to get in touch with an actual pool repair company, follow the instructions of others here, have them backfill with gravel under the deep end, new rebar, thicker concrete for the 10' depth, and new plaster on the entire pool. This will be no cheap task but it will make the home easier to sell.

In anyone's right mind if you couldn't get the problem fixed, why would they want to buy your house and take on a huge problem with an estimated very high cost of repair....unless you're selling at a deep discount vs any other home comparable.

If you patch the pool with expoy or some other silly method besides a real repair, you are going to hurt a family and I hope you're okay with that. You 100% must disclose EVERYTHING regarding the cracks, hollow spot underneath, shoddy repair/patch job, when you sell the house and I guess if you find a dumb enough buyer to accept that risk then it's on them but still not a good thing to do to a family excited to buy a new home with a pool. Please get the pool repaired by a pool repair company that specializes in replastering, fixing cracks, etc.
 

TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
Hammer out the floor and dig until you hit solid ground. Backfill with gravel and compact very well. Add new rebar and tie it into the existing shell and rebar - be sure to have this engineered and site inspected. Shoot 10-12" of shotcrete then replaster the pool.

It might actually be cheaper to demo the entire thing and start fresh... you'd end up with a better product too

Why would it be necessary to hammer out the floor, just to fill it back in with backfill? Why could I not drill holes in the wall, and string rebar from side to side, and make a rebar grid. With the grid anchored in the wall, the floor should be well supported. Then place 10-12 inches of shotcrete over the rebar grid. Then plaster. It seems by not taking out the existing floor, might add additional support to the new layer of shotcrete. I realize that I would be loosing some depth, but the pool at that end is over 10 feet, so to loose a foot or so would not be a big deal.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
961
MA
Why would it be necessary to hammer out the floor,

So you can ensure the floor is sitting on well supported ground. The original floor most likely failed because it is on unstable soil. Just adding more wight by pouring a thicker floor could actually add to the problem.
 
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mguzzy

Gold Supporter
From the pics you've posted it looks like the old foundation of the pool was compromised and washed out or something. So by taking out the old floor and filling it in with gravel you are creating a new base for whatever you install on top of it. If the old base was still structurally sound it would not have failed in the manner it did.
 
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bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
5,529
San Clemente, CA
Why would it be necessary to hammer out the floor, just to fill it back in with backfill? Why could I not drill holes in the wall, and string rebar from side to side, and make a rebar grid. With the grid anchored in the wall, the floor should be well supported. Then place 10-12 inches of shotcrete over the rebar grid. Then plaster. It seems by not taking out the existing floor, might add additional support to the new layer of shotcrete. I realize that I would be loosing some depth, but the pool at that end is over 10 feet, so to loose a foot or so would not be a big deal.
Those two guys said it perfectly👍
 
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TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
It seems, that leaving the existing floor, would add more support, since a rebar grid would be sandwiched between the old floor and the new one. On the existing floor, the rebar rusted in two, and it seems if the rebar was protected from moisture from the ground,, that would not happen again
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
The existing floor is compromised. You said it yourself, when you stated that the rebar is rusted and in pieces. I would not trust it to be substantial enough to hold whatever you are wanting to build on it. So you need to create a new base on which to build. You really need to consult a structural engineer on this. We can only provide general advice.
 

Pprior

Gold Supporter
Feb 14, 2018
64
Englewood, FL
I've seen technology where they inject concrete and/or foam under sagging concrete slabs to fix the problem. it doesn't involve excavation. This technology might be able to be used to support the bottom of the pool without tearing it all out. just a thought.
 
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wilkj1

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Nov 27, 2017
176
okc/okla
well i been in structural concrete for 45 years i sure think that floor needs to be jack hammered out and a solid sub grade replaced then re pour or as Pprior said
I've seen technology where they inject concrete and/or foam under sagging concrete slabs to fix the problem. it doesn't involve excavation. This technology might be able to be used to support the bottom of the pool without tearing it all out. just a thought

then pour over that

one more thing the longer that pool is drained you risk walls failing . even if you did place rebar grid across both ways and tied them in to side walls of pool your adding so much stress to the side walls no way to tell if they dont just pull inward and cause more problems i think the cost of the bottom repair is probably less than the new plaster , and how old is the pool equipment does it need replaced sorry you have not very many cheaper options .
 

TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
well i been in structural concrete for 45 years i sure think that floor needs to be jack hammered out and a solid sub grade replaced then re pour or as Pprior said


then pour over that

one more thing the longer that pool is drained you risk walls failing . even if you did place rebar grid across both ways and tied them in to side walls of pool your adding so much stress to the side walls no way to tell if they dont just pull inward and cause more problems i think the cost of the bottom repair is probably less than the new plaster , and how old is the pool equipment does it need replaced sorry you have not very many cheaper options .
Will the floor have support just by laying a rebar grid across it horizontally. Shouldn't the rebar be anchored vertically to help hold it up?
 

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TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
I've seen technology where they inject concrete and/or foam under sagging concrete slabs to fix the problem. it doesn't involve excavation. This technology might be able to be used to support the bottom of the pool without tearing it all out. just a thought.
Do you know where I could find more information? Could you send me a link?
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
15,481
Evans, Georgia
I dunno.... it's an option. Whether its the *right* option is anyone's guess at this point. Have you spoken to the company themselves??

Maddie
 

TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
Check this link. It's a better description for the product.

 

Pprior

Gold Supporter
Feb 14, 2018
64
Englewood, FL
I think it's a great option, its why I suggested it :)

But seriously, the ability to fill the void disperse pressure over a wide base and shore up weak spots it makes sense. Get them out and get a bid and ask to speak to folks they have done work like this before. Let us know.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
5,362
Damascus, MD
Pool Size
29000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Jandy Aquapure 1400
Not sure why no one has gone this route. Abandon the pool. A pool that large is not going to help sell the house, it is going to hurt it. My advice pay someone $10k to collapse it and fill it in. Either that or sell it as is with full disclosure and a $10k credit. That pool is not worth the effort.
 

TonyTonyTony

Well-known member
May 1, 2020
54
Huntsville
I think it's a great option, its why I suggested it :)

But seriously, the ability to fill the void disperse pressure over a wide base and shore up weak spots it makes sense. Get them out and get a bid and ask to speak to folks they have done work like this before. Let us know.
Have not found any one in my area who doe
 

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